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PRISM Mentors

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PRISM supports all faculty in recruiting postdocs. The faculty listed on this page have expressed special interest in the PRISM program and may be actively recruiting. This is one of many ways to identify potential postdoc mentors; also review the guidance and links in the PRISM Application Guide for other ways to explore Stanford faculty. As you look for potential postdoc mentors, consider how faculty research interests align with your own.

Faculty: to create a profile, click "Log In" at the top right corner, then the "PRISM Faculty Opt In" button below. To edit an existing profile, click "Log In" at the top right corner, then the "Edit" button under your name/department/URL.

 

PRISM Faculty Opt-In   Displaying 451 - 500 of 568
PRISM mentor Research Interests

Eric Darve

Mechanical Engineering, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering
Professor
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Mechanical Engineering, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering


Last Updated: August 15, 2023

Alison Marsden

Pediatrics, Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, Cardiovascular Institute
Associate Professor
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Pediatrics, Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, Cardiovascular Institute


Last Updated: August 09, 2020

The Cardiovascular Biomechanics Computation Lab  develops fundamental computational methods for the study of cardiovascular disease progression, surgical methods, treatment planning and medical devices.  We focus on patient-specific modeling in pediatric and congenital heart disease, as well as adult cardiovascular disease.  Our lab bridges engineering and medicine through the departments of Pediatrics, Bioengineering, and the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering. We develop the SimVascular open source project.

  • Mechanisms in Innovation in Vascular Disease
  • Multi-Disciplinary Training Program in Cardiovascular Imaging at Stanford

Sheri Krams

Immunity Transplant Infection
Professor
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Immunity Transplant Infection


Last Updated: August 12, 2020

Current Research Projects

 

• Pediatric Research Immune Network on SARS-CoV-2 and MIS-C (PRISM)
• Work with our team to consent subjects, obtain and process samples for immune assays to determine the immune responses in children with COVID.

• Identification and Therapeutic Targeting of a Novel Cell Population in Rejection of Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation
• Work with our microsurgeon to establish the cell populations, using CyTOF, important in the initiation of T cell‒mediated rejection of vascularized composite allotransplantation.

• Exosomes as a Reliable Noninvasive Method for Monitoring VCA Graft Rejection
• Work with our microsurgeon to assess the importance of exosomes and their cargo in graft rejection in a novel experimental model of vascularized composite allotransplantation

• Exosomes and the Immune Response in Allograft Outcomes in Pediatric Transplant
Recipients
• Work with a senior postdoctoral fellow to determine the impact of an allograft on the early post-transplant immune response.

  • Molecular and Cellular Immunobiology

Sheri Krams

Immunity Transplant Infection, Surg: Transplantation Surgery
Professor, Senior Associate Dean for Graduate Education and Postdoctoral Affairs
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Immunity Transplant Infection, Surg: Transplantation Surgery


Last Updated: June 23, 2022

Our research focuses on the control of immune responses to alloantigen and viruses (EBV, SARS-CoV-2) using both experimental models and human immunology. Current studies ongoing in the lab are:

Insight into Development and Progression of Multi-System Inflammatory Syndrome and  COVID in Children.
Exosomes and microRNAs in the regulation of  Immune Responses
NK Cell Diversity and Responses to viral and allo antigens
Novel T regulatory populations

Molecular and Cellular Immunobiology/CyTOF/bioinformatics

  • Molecular and Cellular Immunobiology

Olivia Martinez

Immunity Transplant Infection
Professor
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Immunity Transplant Infection


Last Updated: August 15, 2023

My laboratory investigates the immune response to viruses and allogeneic tissues. We are interested in characterizing the human immune response to EBV, CMV, and SARS-CoV-2 to distinguish features that are associated with control of the virus or result in pathologies including COVID-19, MIS-C, and post-transplant viral disease. Projects that are available include 1) analysis of the diversity of TCR usage in the response to EBV, CMV, and SARS-CoV-2 through the use of next generation sequencing and single cell approaches to evaluate T cell phenotype and function; 2) characterization of the natural killer (NK) cell populations that participate in the response to viruses; 3) determining the role of the viral protein LMP1 in activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway and the effect of targeting this pathway in EBV-associated  B cell lymphoma development. 4) identification of novel host gene targets and pathways of oncogenesis utilized by EBV.  Human immunology projects utilize cell lines as well as existing extensive repositories of  human blood and tissue samples. Animal models of transplant immunology and tumor immunology are also established in the lab.

Molecular and Cellular Immunobiology

William Robinson

Med: Immunol and Rheumatology, Immunity Transplant Infection
Professor
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Med: Immunol and Rheumatology, Immunity Transplant Infection


Last Updated: January 12, 2022

Our lab studies the molecular mechanisms of and develops therapies to treat autoimmune and rheumatic diseases, with a focus on rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, multiple sclerosis, and systemic lupus erythematosus.

The overriding objectives of our laboratory are:

1) To investigate the mechanisms underlying autoimmune diseases.

2) To develop novel diagnostics and therapeutics for autoimmune and rheumatic diseases.

3) To investigate the role of innate immune inflammation in osteoarthritis.

We perform translational research, with the goal of rapidly converting discoveries made at the bench into practical patient care tools and therapies.

 

  • Molecular and Cellular Immunobiology
  • Stanford Training Program in Aging Research
  • Training Program in Adult and Pediatric Rheumatology

Agnieszka Czechowicz

Pediatrics, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med
Assistant Professor
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Pediatrics, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med


Last Updated: February 01, 2022

The lab's current research is aimed primarily at understanding how hematopoietic stem cells interact with their microenvironment in order to subsequently modulate these interactions to ultimately improve bone marrow transplantation and unlock biological secrets that further enable regenerative medicine broadly. We are primarily focused on studying the cell surface receptors on hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and bone marrow stromal cells, and are actively learning how manipulating these can alter cell state and cell fate.  We have also pioneered several antibody-based conditioning methods that are at various stages of clinical development to enable safer stem cell transplantation.

There are many exciting opportunities that stem from this work across a variety of disease states ranging from rare genetic diseases, autoimmune diseases, solid organ transplantation, microbiome and cancer. While we are primarily focused on blood and immune diseases, the expanded potential of this work is much broader and can be applied to other organ systems as well and we are very eager to develop collaborations across disease areas. The Czechowicz lab hopes to further add in the field of translation research.

Goals
We aim to increase our understanding of the basic science principles that govern these cells and then exploit these findings to develop improved therapies for patients
We are particularly focused on pediatric non-malignant bone marrow transplantation with a strong interest in genetic blood/immune diseases and bone marrow failure, but do complementry work on solid tumors with marrow disease, solid organ tolerance induction, autoimmune diseases and gene therapy/gene editing.

  • Program in Translational and Experimental Hematology

Max Diehn

Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Center, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med
Associate Professor, Vice Chair of Research, Division Chief of Radiation & Cancer Biology
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Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Center, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med


Last Updated: August 28, 2020

The overarching research goal of the Diehn lab is to develop and translate novel diagnostic assays and therapies to improve personalized treatment of cancer patients. We have a major focus on the development and application of liquid biopsy technologies for human cancers, with a particular emphasis on lung cancers and circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA). We also investigate mechanisms of treatment resistance to radiotherapy, immunotherapy, and targeted agents. Most of our research projects start by identifying an unmet need in the clinical management of cancer patients that we then try to solve via development or application of novel technologies. We use genomics, bioinformatics, stem cell biology, genome editing, mouse genetics, and preclinical cancer models in our work. Discoveries from our group are currently being tested in multiple clinical trials at Stanford and elsewhere in order to translate them into the clinic.

  • Cancer Etiology, Prevention, Detection and Diagnosis
  • Institutional Training Grant in Genome Science
  • Postdoctoral Training in the Radiation Sciences

Margaret Fuller

Developmental Biology, Genetics, Gynecology and Obstetrics, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med
Professor
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Developmental Biology, Genetics, Gynecology and Obstetrics, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med


Last Updated: February 27, 2023

We study the genetic and molecular mechanisms that regulate proliferation and differentiation in adult stem cell lineages, using the Drosophila male germ line as a model.  Our current work is focused on the switch from mitosis to meiosis and how the new gene expression program for cell type specific terminal differentiation is turned on.  One emerging surprise is the potential role of alternative processing of nascent mRNAs in setting up the dramatic change in cell state

  • Institutional Training Grant in Genome Science
  • Postgraduate Training Program in Epithelial Biology
  • Other

Natalia Gomez-Ospina

Ped: Genetics, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med
Assistant Professor
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Ped: Genetics, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med


Last Updated: November 16, 2020

The main focus of Dr. Gomez-Ospina’s lab is to develop therapies for patients with genetic neurodgenerative diseases. The lab uses genome editing and stem cells to produce definitive treatments for childhood neurodegenerative diseases, many of which are lysosomal storage disorders.

Current projects in the lab include developing autologous transplantation of genome-edited hematopoietic stem cells for Mucopolysaccharidosis type I, Gaucher, Krabbe disease, Frontotemporal Dementia, and Friedreich's ataxia.

Although there is a strong translational focus to the lab, we are also pursuing basic science questions to understand and enhance our therapies including: 1) increasing the efficiency of genome editing tools, 2) understanding microglia turnover in response to conditioning before hematopoietic stem transplant, and 3) stablishing brain-specific conditioning regimens to neurometabolic diseases.

Maria Grazia Roncarolo

Pediatrics, Med: Bone Marrow Transplant, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med
Professor
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Pediatrics, Med: Bone Marrow Transplant, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Roncarolo laboratory is exploring the basic biology and translational applications of human type 1 regulatory cells (Tr1). We are using engineered Tr1, ex vivo Tr1, and alloantigen-specific Tr1 to uncover the molecular frameworks that govern Tr1 identity, differentiation and function. We are also translating Tr1 into the clinic. First, Tr1 can be used as a supportive cell therapy to enhance stem cell engraftment and immune reconstitution after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Alloantigen-specific Tr1, designed to prevent graft-vs-host disease (GvHD) after allogeneic HSCT, are already being tested in a phase I/II clinical trial (NCT03198234). Second, we are investigating the mechanisms of action and clinical potential of the engineered Tr1 called CD4(IL-10) or LV-10, generated by lentiviral transduction of CD4 T cells with IL10 gene. Besides their immunosuppressive and anti-GvHD properties, LV-10 lyse primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells and delay myeloid leukemia progression in vivo. We are exploring LV-10 as a novel cell immunotherapy for AML. Finally, we are interested in curing inborn errors of immunity by stem cell transplantation or autologous stem cell gene correction. We are testing a gene editing strategy to correct pathogenic mutations in IL10 and IL10 receptor genes, which cause severe and debilitating VEO-IBD (very early onset inflammatory bowel disease) in infants and young children.

  • Training in Pediatric Nonmalignant Hematology and Stem Cell Biology

Kyle Loh

Developmental Biology, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med
Assistant Professor
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Developmental Biology, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med


Last Updated: August 18, 2023

How the richly varied cell-types in the human body arise from one embryonic cell is a biological marvel and mystery. We have mapped how human pluripotent stem cells develop into over thirty different human cell-types. This roadmap allowed us to efficiently and rapidly generate human liver, bone, heart and blood vessel progenitors in a Petri dish from pluripotent stem cells. Each of these tissue precursors could regenerate their cognate tissue upon injection into respective mouse models, with relevance to regenerative medicine. In addition to our interests in developmental and stem cell biology, we also harbor an emerging interest in deadly biosafety level 4 viruses, such as Ebola and Nipah viruses.

Ravi Majeti

Med: Hematology, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med, Stanford Cancer Center
Professor
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Med: Hematology, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med, Stanford Cancer Center


Last Updated: August 16, 2020

The Majeti lab focuses on the molecular/genomic characterization and therapeutic targeting of leukemia stem cells in human hematologic malignancies, particularly acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In parallel, the lab also investigates normal human hematopoiesis and hematopoietic stem cells. Our lab uses experimental hematology methods, stem cell assays, genome editing, and bioinformatics to define and investigate drivers of leukemia stem cell behavior. As part of these studies, we have led the development and application of robust xenotransplantation assays for both normal and malignant human hematopoietic cells. A major focus of the lab is the investigation of pre-leukemic hematopoietic stem cells in human AML.

  • Cancer Etiology, Prevention, Detection and Diagnosis
  • Program in Translational and Experimental Hematology
  • Training in Pediatric Nonmalignant Hematology and Stem Cell Biology
  • Training Program in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

Aaron Newman

Biomedical Data Sciences, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med
Assistant Professor
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Biomedical Data Sciences, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med


Last Updated: June 02, 2022

Our group combines computational and experimental techniques to study the cellular organization of complex tissues, with a focus on determining the phenotypic diversity and clinical significance of tumor cell subsets. We have a particular interest in developing innovative data science tools that illuminate the cellular hierarchies and stromal elements that underlie tumor initiation, progression, and response to therapy. As part of this focus, we develop new algorithms to resolve cellular states and multicellular communities, tumor developmental hierarchies, and single-cell spatial relationships from genomic profiles of clinical biospecimens. Key results are further explored experimentally, both in our lab and through collaboration, with the goal of translating promising findings into the clinic.

As a member of the Department of Biomedical Data Science and the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, and as an affiliate of graduate programs in Biomedical Informatics, Cancer Biology, and Immunology, we are also interested in the development of impactful biomedical data science tools in areas beyond our immediate research focus, including developmental biology, regenerative medicine, and systems immunology.

Lucy Erin O'Brien

Molecular & Cellular Phys, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med
Assistant Professor
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Molecular & Cellular Phys, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med


Last Updated: August 31, 2020

Mature organs respond to the body's changing needs by moving between different 'states' of cellular flux.
The same organ exhibits different kinds of cell flux over time. This is because flux is dynamically tuned to optimize organ function. At homeostasis, cell addition balances loss, giving rise to equilibrium. Upon environmental change, transient disequilibrium promotes physiological growth or shrinkage. When disequilibrium becomes chronic, it leads to pathogenic resizing and disease. We conceptualize these differences as 'organ states' that form a phase space.

What does organ-scale cellular flux look like, and how do these dynamics arise?
We know many molecular signals that impact cellular flux. Yet, we have scarcely begun to discover how these signals alter the 'lifecycle' of individual cells or understand how cells' life cycles integrate to create diverse organ states. For most organs, even basic spatiotemporal features of these cell behaviors remain mysterious.

Our goal is to explain—and ultimately even predict—how large populations of individual cells act to create diverse organ states in response to external change. We believe that the cell dynamics of adult organs can be understood in the granular way that we currently understand embryonic gastrulation. Toward this vision, we build new experimental approaches and conceptual models to decipher how cell life cycles and molecular signaling together create the organ phase space.

The fly gut is our testing ground for probing cell dynamics at the organ-scale…
The adult Drosophila midgut, or fly gut, is a stem-cell based digestive organ. Its relative simplicity (~10,000 cells), extreme genetic tractability, and ease of handling make it ideal for exploring how single-cell behaviors scale to produce whole-organ phenotypes. Because the organ phase space and the cellular life cycle are general features of adult organs, the lessons we learn from the fly gut will provide a general template for organs in other animals, including humans.

…and is a powerful model to study how dynamic cell flux maintains healthy organ form.
The fly gut is also an archetypical example of an epithelial tube, which is both the most primitive organ form and the form of most organs in our own bodies. As our ability to grow human organs in a dish becomes closer to reality, understanding how general principles of epithelial organization operate with the particular dynamics of adult organs becomes crucial for designing better, safer organ therapies. We leverage these well-understood principles of epithelial organization in order to study how the dynamics of cellular flux in the fly gut both reinforce and respond to organ shape.

Albert Wu

Ophthalmology, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med
Assistant Professor
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Ophthalmology, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med


Last Updated: January 13, 2022

Our translational research laboratory endeavors to bring breakthroughs in stem cell biology and tissue engineering to clinical ophthalmology and reconstructive surgery. Over 6 million people worldwide are afflicted with corneal blindness, usually caused by chemical and thermal burns, ocular cicatricial pemphigoid, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, microbial infections, or chronic inflammation. These injuries often result in corneal vascularization, conjunctivalization, scarring, and opacification from limbal epithelial stem cell (LSC) deficiency (LSCD), for which there is currently no durable treatment.

The most promising cure for bilateral LSCD is finding an autologous source of limbal epithelial cells for transplantation. Utilizing recent advances in the field of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), our research aims to create a reliable and renewable source of limbal epithelial cells for potential use in treating human eye diseases. These cells will be grown on resorbable biomatrices to generate stable transplantable corneal tissue. These studies will serve as the basis for human clinical trials and make regenerative medicine a reality for those with sight-threatening disease. On a broader level, this experimental approach could serve as a paradigm for the creation of other transplantable tissue for use throughout the body. Stem cell biology has the potential to influence every field of medicine and will revolutionize the way we perform surgery.

Tom Abel

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
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Physics, Kavli Institute


Last Updated: October 18, 2021

Tom's current research focuses on studying the formation and evolution of galaxies with new numerical techniques, however, he enjoys all areas of non-linear physics which can be addressed using supercomputer calculations! His research interests span dark matter dynamics, the physics of collisionless shocks, investigating the role that cosmic rays and magnetic fields play in the formation and evolution of galaxies, modeling the formation of stars and black holes as well as turbulence, and applications of numerical general relativity.

Daniel Akerib

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
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Physics, Kavli Institute


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Together with Tom Shutt, Dan works on the LUX and LZ dark matter experiments to search for dark matter in the form of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, or WIMPs. The detectors use liquid xenon as a target medium in a time projection chamber, or TPC. The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment is currently operating a 250-kg target in the former Homestake gold mine in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Preparations are underway at SLAC to design and build the 7-ton successor, known as LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ). The group is involved in many aspects of data analysis, detector design, xenon purification, control andreadout systems, and detector performance studies.

Steven Allen

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
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Physics, Kavli Institute


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Steve is interested in the physics of the most massive objects in the Universe and how we can use them to probe how the Universe evolved. Steve and his group are currently focused on understanding the astrophysics of galaxies and of galaxy clusters using multi-wavelength observations, and on using large, statistical samples of these objects to probe the natures of dark matter, dark energy and fundamental physics. More information regarding ongoing research and a list of Steve's current group members can be found here.

Roger Blandford

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
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Physics, Kavli Institute


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Roger has broad interests in particle astrophysics and cosmology. Roger and his group are currently working on studies of gravitational lensing, compact objects (black holes, neutron stars and white dwarfs) and cosmic rays, tackling difficult questions such as the unknown nature of the gamma-ray flares of the Crab Nebula. He is interested in topics which range from pure theory through phenomenological studies to analysis of observational data. Some of his groups research is strongly computational but plenty is not.

Patricia Burchat

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
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Physics, Kavli Institute


Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Pat and her research group are currently working hard as part of the exciting Large Synoptic Survey Telescope Dark Energy Science Collaboration in the general area of gravitational lensing. Her group is using analytic calculations, simulations and existing astronomical images to thoroughly understand potential systematic biases and challenges in extracting accurate and precise measurements of cosmic shear from gravitational lensing with current and future surveys. Current projects include the study of chromatic effects and blended objects.

Susan Clark

Physics, Kavli Institute
Assistant Professor
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Physics, Kavli Institute


Last Updated: October 18, 2021

Susan is broadly interested in astrophysical magnetism and the physics of the interstellar medium (ISM), from diffuse gas to dense, star-forming regions. Susan’s research tackles open questions like the structure of the Milky Way’s magnetic field, the nature of interstellar turbulence, and the role of magnetism in star formation. These big questions demand multiwavelength observations and new data analysis techniques. Susan is particularly interested in deciphering the magnetic ISM using sensitive measurements of synchrotron and polarized dust emission made by cosmic microwave background experiments like the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) and the Simons Observatory (SO).

Susan Clark

Physics, Kavli Institute
Assistant Professor
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Physics, Kavli Institute


Last Updated: August 15, 2023

Susan is broadly interested in astrophysical magnetism and the physics of the interstellar medium (ISM), from diffuse gas to dense, star-forming regions. Susan’s research tackles open questions like the structure of the Milky Way’s magnetic field, the nature of interstellar turbulence and the multi-phase ISM, and the role of magnetism in star formation. These big questions demand multiwavelength observations and new data analysis techniques. Susan and her group decipher the magnetic ISM using a combination of theory and observation. Data-wise, the group uses a wide range of tracers including gas line emission and absorption, polarized dust and synchrotron emission, starlight polarization, Zeeman splitting, and Faraday rotation. Susan is involved in a number of current and future telescope projects, and leads several efforts focused on Galactic science with sensitive measurements of millimeter-wavelength emission made by cosmic microwave background experiments like the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) and the Simons Observatory (SO).

Peter Graham

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
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Physics, Kavli Institute


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Peter is broadly interested in theoretical physics beyond the Standard Model, including cosmology, astrophysics, general relativity, and even atomic physics. The Standard Model leaves many questions unanswered including the nature of dark matter and the origins of the fundamental fermion masses, the weak scale, and the cosmological constant. These and other clues such as the unification of the forces are a guide to building new theories beyond the Standard Model. Peter's group are interested in inventing novel experiments to uncover this new physics.

Chao-Lin Kuo

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
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Physics, Kavli Institute


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Chao-Lin’s group use the most ancient light, the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, emitted when the universe was in its infancy to shed light on the question of how the universe began. Currently Chao-Lin's group are involved in a number of experiments such as BICEP/BICEP2/Keck Array and have been working hard on detecting primordial B-mode polarization. His group are involved in both he design and construction of instruments as well as the data analysis and theoretical interpretation.

Bruce Macintosh

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
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Physics, Kavli Institute


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Our group works with  adaptive optics - optical systems that correct for aberrations using mirrors that change their shape thousands of times per second. This can allow telescopes located on the Earth to correct for atmospheric turbulence and produce diffraction-limited images, which we use to study giant extrasolar planets through direct imaging with the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) instrument. Direct imaging of extrasolar planets separates the light of the (faint) planet and (bright) star, allowing us to measure the spectrum of young self-luminous giant exoplanets. We are currently planning an upgrade to GPI, adding a faster adaptive optics system using predictive control, and more accurate wavefront sensors. 
 
We are studying this technology for more powerful instruments on the ground and space. We are also exploring applications in biology - microscopes that can look into tissues.

Roger Romani

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
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Physics, Kavli Institute


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Roger is interested in a variety of topics in high energy astrophysics and cosmology. Much of Roger's group are currently focused on understanding the cosmic gamma-ray sources discovered by the Fermi Space telescope, principally pulsars and blazars. This inherently multi-wavelength question requires them to use telescopes all over the world and in space in order to assemble data on these objects and then to develop and test theoretical models to explain what we see.

Aaron Roodman

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
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Physics, Kavli Institute


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Aaron's current research focus is the study of dark energy using images from the ongoing Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the  future Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). He is interested in studying dark energy using both galaxy clusters and weak gravitational lensing. His research group connects instrumental work, in particular active optics and wavefront measurements at DES and a program of camera-wide testing at LSST,  with cosmology measurements. For example, they are developing a new method to characterize the telescope+camera point spread function using optical data, to be part of the weak lensing data analysis at both DES and LSST.

Philip Scherrer

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
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Physics, Kavli Institute


Last Updated: July 14, 2022

Phil's main research interests are in the structure and dynamics of the interior of the sun, how this affect solar activity and through this its effects on terrestrial systems. Phil's group’s primary emphasis is on the structure and dynamics of the solar interior using techniques of helioseismology. His group are interested in both developing instrumentation for solar observatories and in the data analysis of solar magnetic fields from space and from the ground.

Thomas Shutt

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
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Physics, Kavli Institute


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Together with Dan Akerib, Tom works on the LUX and LZ dark matter experiments to search for dark matter in the form of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, or WIMPs. The detectors use liquid xenon as a target medium in a time projection chamber, or TPC. The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment is currently operating a 250-kg target in the former Homestake gold mine in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Preparations are underway atSLAC to design and build the 7-ton successor, known as LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ). The group is involved in many aspects of data analysis, detector design, xenon purification, control andreadout systems, and detector performance studies.

Risa Wechsler

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
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Physics, Kavli Institute


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

How did the Universe form and evolve and what is it made of? Our group works on a range of topics in cosmology and astrophysics, with a focus on the formation of cosmological structure in the Universe, its impact on galaxy formation, and its use in determining the nature of dark matter and dark energy. We build and analyze numerical simulations and develop models of large scale structure and galaxy formation for comparison with large observational datasets, and develop new techniques to learn about the dark side of the Universe from these data.  We are actively involved in the ongoing Dark Energy Survey (DES), the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and also work on finding, measuring, and modeling dwarf galaxies with the SAGA survey.

Maria Grazia Roncarolo

Pediatrics, Med: Bone Marrow Transplant, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med
Professor
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Pediatrics, Med: Bone Marrow Transplant, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Roncarolo laboratory is exploring the basic biology and translational applications of human type 1 regulatory cells (Tr1). We are using engineered Tr1, ex vivo Tr1, and alloantigen-specific Tr1 to uncover the molecular frameworks that govern Tr1 identity, differentiation and function. We are also translating Tr1 into the clinic. First, Tr1 can be used as a supportive cell therapy to enhance stem cell engraftment and immune reconstitution after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Alloantigen-specific Tr1, designed to prevent graft-vs-host disease (GvHD) after allogeneic HSCT, are already being tested in a phase I/II clinical trial (NCT03198234). Second, we are investigating the mechanisms of action and clinical potential of the engineered Tr1 called CD4(IL-10) or LV-10, generated by lentiviral transduction of CD4 T cells with IL10 gene. Besides their immunosuppressive and anti-GvHD properties, LV-10 lyse primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells and delay myeloid leukemia progression in vivo. We are exploring LV-10 as a novel cell immunotherapy for AML. Finally, we are interested in curing inborn errors of immunity by stem cell transplantation or autologous stem cell gene correction. We are testing a gene editing strategy to correct pathogenic mutations in IL10 and IL10 receptor genes, which cause severe and debilitating VEO-IBD (very early onset inflammatory bowel disease) in infants and young children.

  • Training in Pediatric Nonmalignant Hematology and Stem Cell Biology

Everett Meyer

Med: Bone Marrow Transplant, Stanford Cancer Center
Assistant Professor
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Med: Bone Marrow Transplant, Stanford Cancer Center


Last Updated: August 13, 2020

Melody Smith

Med: Bone Marrow Transplant
Assistant Professor
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Med: Bone Marrow Transplant


Last Updated: November 10, 2021

Our lab focuses on the biology of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells in order to improve the efficacy and safety of this therapy (1) by investigating donor and third-party CAR T cells in an immunocompetent mouse model of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) and (2) by assessing the impact of the intestinal microbiome on CAR T cell response. We will seek to enhance the development, administration, and mechanistic understanding of how to safely administer donor and third-party CAR T cells with the aim to potentially translate our work to the clinic. We will investigate the regulatory mechanism of the impact of bacterial taxa and the metabolites that they produce on CAR T cell outcomes.

  • Training Program in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

Justin Annes

Med: Endocrin, Geronot & Metab
Assistant Professor
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Med: Endocrin, Geronot & Metab


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

My lab works towards developing novel therapeutics for Diabetes and Endocrine Cell Tumors. To achieve this goal, we develop (1) new animal disease models  to better understand disease pathogenesis (biologists), (2) innovative screening/discovery  platforms to identify potential therapeutic targets and lead compounds (biologists/biochemists) and  (3) synthesize new chemical entities with desired activities for therapeutic application (medicinal chemists). Hence, typical projects in the lab are interdisciplinary and collaborative where the work of biologists is supported by the power of synthetic chemistry . A major current theme in the lab is addressing the challenge   of cell-targeted drug delivery, i.e. how can we develop a medicine that only acts on the cell type of interest and apply this to (a) a regenerative therapy for diabetes and (b) the treatment of cancer.   If you're excited about disease modeling and/or drug discovery (in diabetes and cancer) my lab might be a good match for you.

Joy Wu

Med: Endocrin, Geronot & Metab
Associate Professor
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Med: Endocrin, Geronot & Metab


Last Updated: November 29, 2021

As a physician scientist with a clinical focus on osteoporosis, my laboratory focuses on stem cell sources for bone-forming osteoblasts, and osteoblast support of hematopoiesis in the bone marrow. In particular we are interested in the pathways that promote osteoblast differentiation, using genetically modified mice and lineage tracing techniques in vivo. We are also studying the role of the osteoblast niche in normal hematopoiesis and bone metastases from breast cancer.

Department URL:
https://medicine.stanford.edu/

  • Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism

Justin Annes


Associate Professor
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Last Updated: February 06, 2023

Diabetes is a disorder of glucose homeostasis that causes excess hospitalization, morbidity and early mortality among the more than 34.2 million disease-affected Americans. Consequently, developing pharmacologic methods to preserve β-cell function and/or stimulate β-cell mass expansion is of intense interest. Presently, the creation of improved diabetes medications is stymied by a dearth of safe therapeutic targets. In fact, on-target but off-tissue drug effects are slowing progress across multiple diabetes therapeutic domains including β-cell regeneration, β-cell preservation, and immune-protection. In principle, stimulating the regeneration of insulin-producing β-cells could be used to restore or enhance endogenous insulin production capacity. Recently, we developed several new highly potent chemical inducers of human β-cell proliferation. However, the non-selective growth-promoting activity of these molecules prevents further clinical development. Consequently, a “modular” (readily transferable) system for β-cell-targeted drug delivery is needed to realize the next generation of diabetes therapeutics. To address this challenge, we are developing a β-cell-targeted drug delivery module based upon the uniquely high zinc content of β-cells. In this system, a zinc-chelating moiety is covalently integrated into a replication-promoting (cargo) compound to generate a bi-functional compound (βRepZnC) that selectively enhances β-cell drug accumulation and replication-promoting activity (PMID: 30527998).

We are seeking a motivated post-doctoral scholar to join our collaborative research team. This scientist will lead and engage  in developing novel βRepZnCs and uncover the biology of β-cell failure. They will define the chemical “rules” that govern zinc-dependent β-cell drug targeting,  examine the in vivo β-cell selectivity (accumulation and replication-promoting activity) of  newly developed βRepZnCs (work is supported by a synthtic chemist) and use CRISPR technology to genetically dissect the pathways that control β-cell zinc and zinc-binding drug accumulation. These studies will a break-through technology for β-cell-targeted drug delivery and provide fundamental (targetable) insights into β-cell biology. This work has the potential to transform our therapeutic approach to diabetes and provide critical insights into β-cell biology.

 

 

  • Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism

Shoa Clarke

Med: Cardiovascular Medicine, Med: Prevention Research Cntr
Assistant Professor
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Med: Cardiovascular Medicine, Med: Prevention Research Cntr


Last Updated: August 28, 2023

The Clarke Lab uses genomics, epidemiology, and data science to understand cardiovascular disease risk. Key areas of focus include:

1. Equitable development and applications of polygenic risk scores

2. Novel phenotyping using electronic health records, wearables, and/or medical imaging

3.  Artificial intelligence applications to medical imaging

4. Studying nataionl biobanks (Million Veteran Program, UK Biobank, All of Us)

 

  • Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Training Program

Christopher Gardner

Med: Prevention Research Cntr
Professor

Med: Prevention Research Cntr


Last Updated: August 27, 2023

For the past 30 years most of my research has been focused on investigating the potential health benefits of various dietary components or food patterns, which have been explored in the context of randomized controlled trials in free-living adult populations. Some of the interventions have involved vegetarian diets, soy foods and soy food components, garlic, omega-3 fats/fish oil/flax oil, antioxidants, Ginkgo biloba, and popular weight loss diets. These trials have ranged in duration from 8 weeks to a year, with study outcomes that have included weight, blood lipids and lipoproteins, inflammatory markers, glucose, insulin, blood pressure and body composition. Most of these trials have been NIH-funded. The most impactful of these was an NIH funded weight loss diet study - DIETFITS (Diet Intervention Examining The Factors Interacting with Treatment Success) that involved randomizing 609 generally healthy, overweight/obese adults for one year to either a Healthy Low-Fat or a Healthy Low-Carb diet. The main findings were published in JAMA in 2018, and many secondary and exploratory analyses are in progress testing and generating follow-up hypotheses.

In the past few years the long-term interests of my research group have shifted to include three additional areas of inquiry. One of these is Stealth Nutrition. The central hypothesis driving this is that in order for more effective and impactful dietary improvements to be realized, public health professionals need to consider adding non-health related approaches to their strategies toolbox. Examples would be the connections between food and 1) global warming and climate change, 2) animal rights and welfare, and 3) human labor abuses (e.g., slaughterhouses, agriculture fields, fast food restaurants). An example of my ongoing research in this area is a summer Food and Farm Camp run in collaboration with the Santa Clara Unified School District since 2011. Every year ~125 kids between the ages of 5-14 years come for 1-week summer camp sessions led by Stanford undergraduates and an Education Director to tend, harvest, chop, cook, and eat vegetables...and play because it is summer camp! The objective is to study the factors influencing the behaviors and preferences that lead to maximizing vegetable consumption in kids.

A second area of interest and inquiry is institutional food. Universities, worksites, hospitals, and schools order and serve a lot of food, every day. If the choices offered are healthier, the consumption behaviors will be healthier. A key factor to success in institutional food is to make the food options "unapologetically delicious" a term I borrow from Greg Drescher, a colleague and friend at the Culinary Institute of America (the other CIA). Chefs are trained to make great tasting food, and chefs in institutional food settings can be part of the solution to improving eating behaviors. In 2015 I helped to initiate a Stanford-CIA collaboration that now ~70 universities that have agreed to collectively use their dining halls as living laboratories to study ways to maximize the synergy of taste, health and environmental sustainability (Menus of Change University Research Collaborative - MC-URC). If universities, worksites, hospitals and schools change the foods they serve, they will change the foods they order, and that kind of institutional demand can change agricultural practices - a systems-level approach to achieving healthier dietary behaviors.

The third area is diet and the microbiome. Our lab has now partnered with the world renowned lab of Drs. Justin and Erica Sonnenburg at Stanford to conduct multiple human nutrition intervention studies that involve 1) dietary intervention, 2) microbiome characterization, and 3) outcomes related to inflammation and immune function. The most impactful of these studies was the Fe-Fi-Fo study (Fermented and Fiber-rich Foods) study published in Cell in 2021. In that 10-week intervention, study participants consuming more fermented foods increased their microbial diversity and decreased blood levels in almost 20 inflammatory markers. Our ongoing Maternal and Offspring Microbiome Study (MOMS) is examining the transfer of the maternal microbiome to the infant among 132 pregnant women randomized to increase fiber, or fermented food, or both or neither for their 2nd and 3rd trimester; the infants will be tracked for 18 months.

My long-term vision in this area is to help create a world-class Stanford Food Systems Initiative and build on the idea that Stanford is uniquely positioned geographically, culturally, and academically, to address national and global crises in the areas of obesity and diabetes that are directly related to our broken food systems.

  • Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Training Program

Josh Knowles

Med: Cardiovascular Medicine, Cardiovascular Institute, Med: Prevention Research Cntr
Assistant Professor
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Med: Cardiovascular Medicine, Cardiovascular Institute, Med: Prevention Research Cntr


Last Updated: January 13, 2022

The overall theme of our research has been the genetic basis of cardiovascular disease across the continuum from Discovery to the development of Model Systems to the Translation of these findings to the clinic and most recently to the Public Health aspect of genetics. Currently our Discovery and basic translational efforts center on understanding the genetic basis of insulin resistance using genome wide association studies coupled advanced genetic analyses such as colocalization with exploration using in vitro and in vivo model systems including induced pluripotent stem cells and and gene editing screens. 

  • Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Training Program
  • Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism
  • Mechanisms in Innovation in Vascular Disease
  • Multi-Disciplinary Training Program in Cardiovascular Imaging at Stanford
  • Other

Jodi Prochaska

Med: Prevention Research Cntr
Professor of Medicine - Stanford Prevention Research Center, Senior Associate Vice Provost for Clinical Research Governance
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Med: Prevention Research Cntr


Last Updated: February 02, 2024

Dr. Prochaska’s research program leverages technology to study and treat tobacco, alcohol, and other risk behaviors in populations at high risk. Her research spans community-based epidemiologic studies, randomized controlled clinical trials, and health policy analysis. Dr. Prochaska has conducted and collaborated on over 25 randomized controlled behavioral intervention trials, targeting tobacco and other risk behaviors with adolescents and adults.

  • Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Training Program

Thomas Robinson

Ped: General Pediatrics, Med: Prevention Research Cntr, Epidemiology and Population Health, Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford Cancer Center, Woods Institute, HumanCentered Artificial Inte
Professor
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Ped: General Pediatrics, Med: Prevention Research Cntr, Epidemiology and Population Health, Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford Cancer Center, Woods Institute, HumanCentered Artificial Inte


Last Updated: January 27, 2023

Stanford Solutions Science Lab.

The Stanford Solutions Science Lab designs solutions to improve health and well-being of children, families, and the planet.  Dr. Robinson originated the solution-oriented research paradigm. He is known for his pioneering obesity prevention and treatment research, including the concept of stealth interventions. His research applies social cognitive models of behavior change to behavioral, social, environmental and policy interventions for children and families in real world settings, making the results relevant for informing clinical and public health practice and policy. His research is largely experimental, conducting rigorous school-, family- and community-based randomized controlled trials. He studies obesity and disordered eating, nutrition, physical activity/inactivity and sedentary behavior, the effects of television and other screen time, adolescent smoking, aggressive behavior, consumerism, and behaviors to promote environmental sustainability. Rich longitudinal datasets of physical, physiological, psychological, behavioral, social, behavioral, and multi-omics measures are available from our many community-based obesity prevention and treatment trials in low-income and racial/ethnic minority populations of children and adolescents and their parents.

Stanford Screenomics Lab - Human Screenome Project.

People increasingly live their lives through smartphones. Our Stanford Screenomics app captures everything that people see and do on their smartphone screens – a record of digital life – by taking a screenshot every 5 seconds. The resulting sequence of screenshots, make up an individual’s screenome, an unique and dynamic sequence of exposures, thoughts, feelings, and actions. To date, we have collected more than 350 million screenshots from 6-12 months of phone use from national samples of about 500 hundred adults and adolescents and their parents. Opportunities available to study the screenome to understand digital media use and its impacts on health and behavior,  develop novel diagnostics and prognostics from the screenome, and deliver precision interventions to improve health and well being. An opportunity to help build this paradigm-disrupting new science.

Suzan Carmichael

Pediatrics, Maternal Fetal Medicine and Obstetrics
Professor
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Pediatrics, Maternal Fetal Medicine and Obstetrics


Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Dr. Carmichael is a perinatal and nutritional epidemiologist and Professor of Pediatrics and Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Her research focuses on finding ways to improve maternal and infant health. Exposure themes include nutrition, social context, care, environmental contaminants and genetics. Outcome themes include severe maternal morbidity, stillbirth, birth defects, and preterm delivery. She is particularly interested in understanding the intersectionality of these varied types of exposures and outcomes and how they interact to impact health and health disparities, for the mother-baby dyad, in domestic as well as global health settings. She currently (mid 2020) has an opening in her lab for a post-doc focused on maternal health.

SUZAN CARMICHAEL

Pediatrics, Maternal Fetal Medicine and Obstetrics, Epidemiology and Population Health
PROFESSOR
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Pediatrics, Maternal Fetal Medicine and Obstetrics, Epidemiology and Population Health


Last Updated: January 29, 2023

Our team is committed to finding ways to improve maternal and infant health outcomes and equity by leading research that identifies effective leverage points for change, from upstream 'macro' social and structural factors, to downstream 'micro' clinical factors through a collaborative research approach that integrates epidemiologic approaches with community engagement and systems thinking.

Disparities are prominent in maternal and infant health, so a lot of our work is centered on equity.  Focusing on highest-risk groups will improve health for everyone.

Much of our current research focuses on severe maternal morbidity (SMM). SMM encompasses adverse conditions that put pregnant people at risk of short and long-term consequences related to labor and delivery, including death.

We also study other important perinatal outcomes, including stillbirth, preterm birth, structural congenital malformations and other maternal morbidities.  We are interested in these outcomes individually, as well as in how they are connected to each other -- from a mechanistic standpoint (ie, do they share the same causes), and a lifecourse perspective (eg, how does an adverse newborn outcome affect the mom's postpartum health, and vice versa).

Dr. Carmichael's training is in perinatal and nutritional epidemiology.  She deeply appreciates her multi-disciplinary colleagues who make this work more meaningful by bringing their own varied perspectives and lived experiences, and their expertise in clinical care, qualitative and mixed methods, community engagement, and state-of-the-art epidemiologic approaches and biostatistical methods.

Virginia Winn

Maternal Fetal Medicine and Obstetrics, Reproductive Biology
Associate Professor
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Maternal Fetal Medicine and Obstetrics, Reproductive Biology


Last Updated: January 27, 2023

Her lab seeks to understand the unique biological mechanisms of human placentation. While the placenta itself is one of the key characteristics for defining mammals, the human placenta is different from most available animal models: it is one of the most invasive placentas, and results in the formation of an organ comprised of cells from both the fetus and the mother. In addition to this fascinating chimerism, fetal cells are deeply involved in the remodeling of the maternal vasculature in order to redirect large volumes of maternal blood to the placenta to support the developing fetus. As such, the investigation of this human organ covers a large array of biological processes, and deals not only with understanding its endocrine function, but the physiologic process of immune tolerance, vascular remodeling, and cellular invasion.

As a physician scientist, Dr. Winn’s ultimate goal is to see this knowledge translate to improved clinical care resulting in healthier mothers and babies. Her lab uses a combination of molecular, cellular, tissue and translational studies in their research.

Kelly Gaffney

PULSE Institute
Associate Professor
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PULSE Institute


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Professor Gaffney leads a research team focused on femtosecond resolution measurements of chemical dynamics in complex condensed phase systems. This research takes advantage of recent advances in ultrafast x-ray lasers, like the LCLS at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, to directly observe chemical reactions on the natural time and length scales of the chemical bond – femtoseconds and Ångströms. This research focuses on the discovery of design principles for controlling the non-equilibrium dynamics of electronic excited states and using these principles to spark new approaches to light-driven catalysis in chemical synthesis.

This research builds on Professor Gaffney’s extensive experience with ultrafast optical laser science and technology. This work began with time- and angle- resolved two photon photoemission studies of electron solvation and localization at interfaces as a graduate student working with Professor Charles Harris at the University of California at Berkeley and extended to multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy studies of hydrogen bonding and ion solvation dynamics in solution during postdoctoral studies with Professor Michael Fayer at Stanford and as an Assistant Professor. The transition to ultrafast x-ray science began in 2004 at SLAC, where he helped establish the first chemical dynamics research program at SLAC.

Utkan Demirci

Stanford Cancer Center
Professor, Department of Radiology , Canary Interim Chief and Director
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Stanford Cancer Center


Last Updated: June 29, 2022

Utkan Demirci is a professor at Stanford University School of Medicine and serves as the interim division chief and co-director of the Canary Center for Cancer Early Detection in the Department of Radiology. His group focuses on developing innovative microfluidic biomedical technology platforms with broad applications to multiple diseases. Some of his inventions have already been translated into Food and Drug Administration-approved products serving patients. He has mentored and trained many successful scientists, entrepreneurs, and academicians. Currently, the group has a strong core focused on bio fabrication, Extracellular vesicle enrichment, and isolation, small-scale robotics for biomedicine, and the development of point-of-care metamaterial-based optical sensors.

Max Diehn

Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Center, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med
Associate Professor, Vice Chair of Research, Division Chief of Radiation & Cancer Biology
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Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Center, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med


Last Updated: August 28, 2020

The overarching research goal of the Diehn lab is to develop and translate novel diagnostic assays and therapies to improve personalized treatment of cancer patients. We have a major focus on the development and application of liquid biopsy technologies for human cancers, with a particular emphasis on lung cancers and circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA). We also investigate mechanisms of treatment resistance to radiotherapy, immunotherapy, and targeted agents. Most of our research projects start by identifying an unmet need in the clinical management of cancer patients that we then try to solve via development or application of novel technologies. We use genomics, bioinformatics, stem cell biology, genome editing, mouse genetics, and preclinical cancer models in our work. Discoveries from our group are currently being tested in multiple clinical trials at Stanford and elsewhere in order to translate them into the clinic.

  • Cancer Etiology, Prevention, Detection and Diagnosis
  • Institutional Training Grant in Genome Science
  • Postdoctoral Training in the Radiation Sciences

Andrew Gentles

Biomedical Data Sciences, Med: Biomedical Informatics Research (BMIR), Stanford Cancer Center, Neuroscience Institute
Assistant professor
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Biomedical Data Sciences, Med: Biomedical Informatics Research (BMIR), Stanford Cancer Center, Neuroscience Institute


Last Updated: January 12, 2022

Our research focus is in computational systems biology, primarily in cancer and more recently in neurodegenerative diseases.  We develop and apply methods to understand biological processes underlying disease, using high-throughput genomic and proteomic datasets and integrating them with phenotypes and clinical outcomes. A key interest is dissecting how the cellular composition and organization of tissues affects their behaviour in disease; and how these things might be targeted for therapy or diagnostic purposes. We collaborate with many wet lab and clinical groups at Stanford, including in the areas of cancer, immunology, and neuroscience.

Craig Levin

Radiology, Physics, Electrical Engineering, Bioengineering, Radiology-MIPS, Stanford Cancer Center, Cardiovascular Institute, Neuroscience Institute
Professor
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Radiology, Physics, Electrical Engineering, Bioengineering, Radiology-MIPS, Stanford Cancer Center, Cardiovascular Institute, Neuroscience Institute


Last Updated: March 16, 2022

The research interests of the molecular imaging instrumentation lab are to create novel instrumentation and software algorithms for in vivo imaging of molecular signatures of disease in humans and small laboratory animals. These new cameras efficiently image radiation emissions in the form of positrons, annihilation photons, gamma rays, and/or light emitted from molecular contrast agents that were introduced into the body and distributed in the subject tissues. These contrast agents are designed to target molecular pathways of disease biology and enable imaging of these biological signatures in tissues residing deep within the body using measurements made from outside the body.

The goals of the instrumentation projects are to advance the sensitivity and spatial, spectral, and/or temporal resolutions, and to create new camera geometries for special biomedical applications. The computational modeling and algorithm goals are to understand the physical system comprising the subject tissues, radiation transport, and imaging system, and to provide the best available image quality and quantitative accuracy.

The work involves designing and building instrumentation, including arrays of position sensitive sensors, readout electronics, and data acquisition electronics, signal processing research, including creation of computer models, and image reconstruction, image processing, and data/image analysis algorithms, and incorporating these innovations into practical imaging devices.

The ultimate goal is to introduce these new imaging tools into studies of molecular mechanisms and treatments of disease within living subjects.

  • Cancer-Translational Nanotechnology Training Program (Cancer-TNT)
  • Multi-Disciplinary Training Program in Cardiovascular Imaging at Stanford
  • Stanford Cancer Imaging Training (SCIT) Program
  • Stanford Molecular Imaging Scholars (SMIS)

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