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PRISM Mentors

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PRISM supports all faculty in recruiting postdocs. The faculty listed on this page have expressed special interest in the PRISM program and may be actively recruiting. This is one of many ways to identify potential postdoc mentors; also review the guidance and links in the PRISM Application Guide for other ways to explore Stanford faculty. As you look for potential postdoc mentors, consider how faculty research interests align with your own.

Faculty: to create a profile, click "Log In" at the top right corner, then the "PRISM Faculty Opt In" button below. To edit an existing profile, click "Log In" at the top right corner, then the "Edit" button under your name/department/URL.

 

Neurosurgery
PRISM mentor Research Interests

Lu Chen

Neurosurgery
Professor
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Neurosurgery

Last Updated: June 24, 2022

My research program aims to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie synapse function during behavior in the developing and mature brain, and how synapse function is altered in neurodevelopmental disorders. Within this broad research area, I am specifically interested in the following three overall themes.
1. Investigate the synaptic signaling mechanisms regulating homeostatic synaptic plasticity, the role of postsynaptic protein translation in this control, and how these signaling mechanisms are compromised in neurodevelopmental disorders. Toward this goal, we combine molecular, biochemical, electrophysiological, and cell biological approaches to examine retinoic acid signaling pathways that mediate activity-dependent regulation of synaptic function, both globally at a whole cell level or locally with each synapse as an independent computational unit of the neuron. We also explore how genetic mutations implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders alter homeostatic synaptic plasticity in both mouse models and human neurons derived from patient iPS cells.
2. Investigate interactions between retinoic acid-mediated homeostatic synaptic plasticity and other forms of long-lasting synaptic changes (e.g. Hebbian plasticity), how this interaction impacts learning and memory formation at behavioral levels, and how defective homeostatic synaptic plasticity underlies cognitive deficits in neurodevelopmental disorders. Our investigation of molecular mechanisms underlying homeostatic synaptic plasticity provides unique molecular tools with which we could begin to manipulate homeostatic plasticity specifically and examine its impact on Hebbian plasticity. We use both behavioral assays and slice electrophysiology as our functional readouts. Moreover, we developed protocols to investigate memory recall accuracy using activity-dependent genetic labeling in behaving animals, thus further exploring the mechanisms of memory encoding (or lack thereof in the case of disease models) at neural network levels.
3. Investigate synaptic and circuit changes in spinal dorsal horn in peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain models. We extend our investigations of synaptic plasticity mechanisms from the brain circuits to spinal dorsal horn circuits because we believe some of the most fundamental molecular mechanisms underlying experience-dependent synaptic modifications are shared between similar types of synapses in different regions of the CNS. Indeed, our recent work on synaptic changes driving nerve injury-induced spinal disinhibition supports this notion. The current application builds upon ample preliminary data and applies knowledge generated from our studies in the brain circuits to explore spinal circuits. 
To achieve these goals, we combine expertise spanning molecular and cellular biology, protein biochemistry, stem cell biology, slice electrophysiology, in vivo imaging and MEA recordings, and behavioral assays.

  • Research Training for Child Psychiatry and Neurodevelopment

Ryann Fame

Neurosurgery
Assistant Professor
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Neurosurgery

Last Updated: November 28, 2022

Early neural progenitors respond to extrinsic cues that maintain and support their potency. These stem/ progenitor cells are in direct contact with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which acts as part of their niche. Our research program encompasses the early neural stem cell niche, neural tube closure, CSF, metabolism, and cortical neuronal development. We are dedicated to broad collaboration focused on translating an understanding of neurodevelopment and CSF biology into regenerative strategies.

Melanie Hayden Gephart

Neurosurgery
Associate Professor
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Neurosurgery

Last Updated: February 23, 2024

We seek greater understanding of the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms driving tumorigenesis and disease progression in malignant brain tumors. We currently study the capacity of cellular and cell-free nucleic acids to inform treatment choices in patients with brain tumors, mechanisms of brain tumor cell migration, and identify potentially targetable genes and pathways. Our laboratory space lies at the heart of the Stanford campus between the core campus and the medical facilities, emblematic of the translational aspects of our work.

Jaimie Henderson

Neurosurgery
Professor
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Neurosurgery

Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Claudia K. Petritsch

Neurosurgery
Associate Professor
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Neurosurgery

Last Updated: May 31, 2024

THE PETRITSCH BRAIN TUMOR STEM CELL AND MODELS RESEARCH LAB

The Petritsch lab broadly investigates underlying causes for the intra-tumoral heterogeneity and immune suppression in brain tumors from a developmental neurobiology point of view. Defects in cell fate control could explain many key defects present in brain tumors and an understanding of how brain cells control the fate of their progeny may identify novel points of vulnerabilities to target with therapeutics. Of special emphasis, we study the establishment of cell fates within normal hierarchical brain lineages for comparison to the dysregulated cell-fate hierarchies seen in brain tumors. Our lab was the first to demonstrate that normal adult oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) undergo asymmetric divisions to make cell fate decisions, i.e. to generate OPCs as well as differentiating cells each time they divide. Drawing from these data, we investigate whether brain tumors divide along hierarchical lineages and how oncogenic mutations might affect cell fate decisions within these hierarchies. A major line of investigation in our lab focuses on whether defects in the asymmetric division lead to aberrant cell fate decisions that cause the paradigm mixed-lineage phenotypes and the intra-tumoral heterogeneity present across tumors.

To study the interactions between tumor cells and the immune system, we have developed and utilized transplantable mouse glioma models. We are tasked to facilitate and coordinate the distribution of fresh tissue from the neurosurgery operating room and have access to fresh brain tissue from patient surgeries, from which we prepare cell culture models for brain tumors and normal progenitors. We complement our work with human cells with studies in genetically engineered mouse models of gliomagenesis to conduct molecular, cellular, and bioinformatic analyses.

Kathleen Poston

Neurosurgery
Associate Professor
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Neurosurgery

Last Updated: August 05, 2021

The Poston Lab seeks to understand the biological underpinnings of non-motor symptoms in patients with Lewy Body diseases, such as Parkinson's disease and Lewy Body Dementia. While our primary focus is understanding cognition and dementia, we also study other prominent non-motor symptoms such as psychosis/hallucinations, sleep disruption, orthostatic dysregulation, and others.  A major focus is on the role of co-pathologies, such as Alzheimer's and vascular co-pathologies, and the role of neuro-inflammation, in the development of Lewy Body disease associated non-motor symptoms.  We collect clinical, motor, neuropsychological, biological, genetic, and imaging data on patients and healthy older adults to perform our studies. 

Suzanne Tharin

Neurosurgery
Assistant Professor
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Neurosurgery

Last Updated: February 23, 2024

We study the roles of microRNAs in cortical projection neuron development, with an emphasis on corticospinal motor neurons. We have identified a group of mircoRNAs specifically enriched in corticospinal motor neurons during their development and are investigating their functions in cortical progenitors in vitro and in vivo, as well as in ES cells.

Xinnan Wang

Neurosurgery

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Neurosurgery

Last Updated: January 28, 2022

Mitochondria move and undergo fission and fusion in all eukaryotic cells. The accurate allocation of mitochondria in neurons is particularly critical due to the significance of mitochondria for ATP supply, Ca++ homeostasis and apoptosis and the importance of these functions to the distal extremities of neurons. In addition, defective mitochondria, which can be highly deleterious to a cell because of their output of reactive oxygen species, need to be repaired by fusing with healthy mitochondria or cleared from the cell. Thus mitochondrial cell biology poses critical questions for all cells, but especially for neurons: how the cell sets up an adequate distribution of the organelle; how it sustains mitochondria in the periphery; and how mitochondria are removed after damage. The goal of our research is to understand the regulatory mechanisms controlling mitochondrial dynamics and function and the mechanisms by which even subtle perturbations of these processes may contribute to neurodegenerative disorders.

Brad Zuchero

Neurosurgery
Assistant Professor
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Neurosurgery

Last Updated: August 15, 2023

Glia are a frontier of neuroscience, and overwhelming evidence from the last decade shows that they are essential regulators of all aspects of the nervous system. The Zuchero Lab aims to uncover how glial cells regulate neural development and how their dysfunction contributes to diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) and in injuries like stroke.

Although glia represent more than half of the cells in the human brain, fundamental questions remain to be answered. How do glia develop their highly specialized morphologies and interact with neurons to powerfully control form and function of the nervous system? How is this disrupted in neurodegenerative diseases and after injury? By bringing cutting-edge cell biology techniques to the study of glia, we aim to uncover how glia help sculpt and regulate the nervous system and test their potential as novel, untapped therapeutic targets for disease and injury.

We are particularly interested in myelin, the insulating sheath around neuronal axons that is lost in diseases like MS. How do oligodendrocytes- the glial cell that produces myelin in the central nervous system- form and remodel myelin, and why do they fail to regenerate myelin in disease? Our current projects aim to use cell biology and neuroscience approaches to answer these fundamental questions. Ultimately we hope our work will lead to much-needed therapies to promote remyelination in patients.

  • Epilepsy Training Grant
Med: Nephrology
PRISM mentor Research Interests

Vivek Bhalla

Med: Nephrology
Associate Professor of Medicine / Nephrology
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Med: Nephrology

Last Updated: January 26, 2022

Dr. Bhalla received his training in molecular biology at UC San Francisco. His postdoctoral work centered on the regulation of aldosterone-mediated sodium transport in health and disease. In his laboratory he uses both in vitro and in vivo approaches for several projects related to the role of the kidney in health, diabetes, and hypertension. (1) Diabetic kidney disease is costly and consequential. Diabetic kidney disease is the most common form of chronic kidney disease in the world, yet no curative therapy is available. Studies of the susceptibility of diabetic kidney disease led to the discovery of differential regulation of endothelial-specific molecule-1, Esm-1 (endocan) in susceptible strains of mice. Esm-1 is a secreted proteoglycan that is enriched in glomerular endothelium and inhibits interferon signaling in glomeruli in the setting of diabetes and other inflammatory diseases. Ongoing rescue and deletion experiments explore the role of Esm-1 in diabetes and diabetic kidney disease. We also study the regulation of Esm-1 transcription and protein stability. (2) Investigation of the mechanisms of hypertension in the setting of obesity and insulin resistance using renal tubular epithelial insulin receptor deletion challenged the role of insulin in the hypertension of obesity, insulin resistance, and the metabolic syndrome. These studies also shed light on the role of insulin in control of glucose reabsorption via SGLT2. Ongoing studies focus on molecular mechanisms of insulin-regulated SGLT2 and its contrast with insulin resistant pathways in other cell types and tissues. (3) Inhibition of sodium reabsorption using diuretics is a mainstay of therapy for hypertension and edema-forming states. Study on the consequences of diuretic therapy using tubular morphometry and single cell approaches have led to additional work on mechanisms of tubular remodeling in vivo.

  • Adult and Pediatric Nephrology and Urology Research Training Program
  • Other
Med: Gastroenterology
PRISM mentor Research Interests

Natalie Torok

Med: Gastroenterology
Professor

Med: Gastroenterology

Last Updated: January 25, 2024

Our laboratory has been focusing on the mechanisms of fibrosis  elucidating the links between activation of redox pathways, cell death, stellate cell activation and transdifferentiation to myofibroblasts. We have been interested in the role of NADPH oxidases and their cell-specific roles in liver injury and repair.   We are  investigating  how changes in the mechanical properties  of the extracellular matrix and architecture  elicit changes in cellular behavior, and how these predispose to cancer invasion.   While matrix stiffness in advanced fibrosis/cirrhosis and its effects on cancer progression have been extensively studied, we demonstrated how changes in viscoelasticity, independent of stiffness, impact hepatocellular carcinoma growth. This is clinically very relevant as increasing viscoelasticity could be a new risk factor foretelling more invasive features of cancer in diabetic patients.

With the  type 2 diabetes and steatotic liver disease epidemics, the ultimate goal is to translate our findings and develop novel therapeutic approaches that  improve patient outcomes.

  • Training grant in academic gastroenterology
Cardiovascular Institute
PRISM mentor Research Interests

Kevin Alexander

Cardiovascular Institute
Assistant Professor
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Cardiovascular Institute

Last Updated: January 29, 2023

Kevin Alexander

Cardiovascular Institute
Assistant Professor
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Cardiovascular Institute

Last Updated: February 04, 2024

Amyloidosis, heart failure, transplantation

  • Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Training Program
  • Stanford Training Program in Aging Research
  • Training in Myocardial Biology at Stanford (TIMBS)

Brian Kim

Cardiovascular Institute
Assistant Professor
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Cardiovascular Institute

Last Updated: November 15, 2023

The lifetime risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) is determined by the genetic makeup and exposure to modifiable risk factors. The Cardiovascular Link to Environmental ActioN (CLEAN) Lab is interested in understanding how various environmental pollutants (eg. tobacco, e-cigarettes, air pollution and wildfire) interact with genes to affect the transcriptome, epigenome, and eventually disease phenotype of CVD. The current focus is to investigate how different toxic exposures can adversely remodel the vascular wall leading to increased cardiac events. We intersect human genomic discoveries with animal models of disease, in-vitro and in-vivo systems of exposure, single-cell sequencing technologies to solve these questions. Additionally, we collaborate with various members of the Stanford community to develop biomarkers that will aid with detection and prognosis of CVD. We are passionate about the need to reduce the environmental effects on health through advocacy and outreach. We strongly believe that the mechanistic understanding of the adverse health effects of harmful exposures will help to devise a targeted approach towards reduction of environmental toxins as well as to identify areas in need of improving environmental equity.

  • Mechanisms in Innovation in Vascular Disease
  • Training in Myocardial Biology at Stanford (TIMBS)

Josh Knowles

Cardiovascular Institute
Assistant Professor
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Cardiovascular Institute

Last Updated: January 13, 2022

The overall theme of our research has been the genetic basis of cardiovascular disease across the continuum from Discovery to the development of Model Systems to the Translation of these findings to the clinic and most recently to the Public Health aspect of genetics. Currently our Discovery and basic translational efforts center on understanding the genetic basis of insulin resistance using genome wide association studies coupled advanced genetic analyses such as colocalization with exploration using in vitro and in vivo model systems including induced pluripotent stem cells and and gene editing screens. 

  • Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Training Program
  • Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism
  • Mechanisms in Innovation in Vascular Disease
  • Multi-Disciplinary Training Program in Cardiovascular Imaging at Stanford
  • Other

Craig Levin

Cardiovascular Institute
Professor
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Cardiovascular Institute

Last Updated: March 16, 2022

The research interests of the molecular imaging instrumentation lab are to create novel instrumentation and software algorithms for in vivo imaging of molecular signatures of disease in humans and small laboratory animals. These new cameras efficiently image radiation emissions in the form of positrons, annihilation photons, gamma rays, and/or light emitted from molecular contrast agents that were introduced into the body and distributed in the subject tissues. These contrast agents are designed to target molecular pathways of disease biology and enable imaging of these biological signatures in tissues residing deep within the body using measurements made from outside the body.

The goals of the instrumentation projects are to advance the sensitivity and spatial, spectral, and/or temporal resolutions, and to create new camera geometries for special biomedical applications. The computational modeling and algorithm goals are to understand the physical system comprising the subject tissues, radiation transport, and imaging system, and to provide the best available image quality and quantitative accuracy.

The work involves designing and building instrumentation, including arrays of position sensitive sensors, readout electronics, and data acquisition electronics, signal processing research, including creation of computer models, and image reconstruction, image processing, and data/image analysis algorithms, and incorporating these innovations into practical imaging devices.

The ultimate goal is to introduce these new imaging tools into studies of molecular mechanisms and treatments of disease within living subjects.

  • Cancer-Translational Nanotechnology Training Program (Cancer-TNT)
  • Multi-Disciplinary Training Program in Cardiovascular Imaging at Stanford
  • Stanford Cancer Imaging Training (SCIT) Program
  • Stanford Molecular Imaging Scholars (SMIS)

Alison Marsden

Cardiovascular Institute
Associate Professor
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Cardiovascular Institute

Last Updated: August 09, 2020

The Cardiovascular Biomechanics Computation Lab  develops fundamental computational methods for the study of cardiovascular disease progression, surgical methods, treatment planning and medical devices.  We focus on patient-specific modeling in pediatric and congenital heart disease, as well as adult cardiovascular disease.  Our lab bridges engineering and medicine through the departments of Pediatrics, Bioengineering, and the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering. We develop the SimVascular open source project.

  • Mechanisms in Innovation in Vascular Disease
  • Multi-Disciplinary Training Program in Cardiovascular Imaging at Stanford

Sushma Reddy

Cardiovascular Institute
Associate Professor of Pediatrics
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Cardiovascular Institute

Last Updated: September 05, 2023

My laboratory's overall goal is to (i) understand the mechanisms of right heart failure in children and adults with congenital heart disease and (ii) to develop biomarkers as a plasma signature of myocardial events to better understand the mechanisms of heart failure, improve monitoring of disease progression, early detection of heart failure and risk-stratification.

We have focused on tetralogy of Fallot population and single ventricle heart disease. As the survival continues to improve, so also has the incidence of heart failure. However, the underlying cellular mechanisms of heart failure are poorly understood as a result of which no targeted therapy is available. Since it is not possible to obtain heart muscle biopsies routinely on patients, we have taken a novel strategy of using Multi-Omics to better understand disease mechanisms and to follow patients over time comparing their Omics signature to themselves thereby personalizing their care. The goal is to create a targeted biomarker panel for clinical utility to be used in conjunction with imaging data to improve overall prediction of risk. Based on our work to date, we are also interested in understanding myocardial mitochondrial and vascular dysfunction as these have the potential to serve as novel therapeutic targets.

Lab website is in creation. Link will be updated when it is ready.

 

  • Training in Myocardial Biology at Stanford (TIMBS)

Thomas Robinson

Cardiovascular Institute
Professor
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Cardiovascular Institute

Last Updated: January 27, 2023

Stanford Solutions Science Lab.

The Stanford Solutions Science Lab designs solutions to improve health and well-being of children, families, and the planet.  Dr. Robinson originated the solution-oriented research paradigm. He is known for his pioneering obesity prevention and treatment research, including the concept of stealth interventions. His research applies social cognitive models of behavior change to behavioral, social, environmental and policy interventions for children and families in real world settings, making the results relevant for informing clinical and public health practice and policy. His research is largely experimental, conducting rigorous school-, family- and community-based randomized controlled trials. He studies obesity and disordered eating, nutrition, physical activity/inactivity and sedentary behavior, the effects of television and other screen time, adolescent smoking, aggressive behavior, consumerism, and behaviors to promote environmental sustainability. Rich longitudinal datasets of physical, physiological, psychological, behavioral, social, behavioral, and multi-omics measures are available from our many community-based obesity prevention and treatment trials in low-income and racial/ethnic minority populations of children and adolescents and their parents.

Stanford Screenomics Lab - Human Screenome Project.

People increasingly live their lives through smartphones. Our Stanford Screenomics app captures everything that people see and do on their smartphone screens – a record of digital life – by taking a screenshot every 5 seconds. The resulting sequence of screenshots, make up an individual’s screenome, an unique and dynamic sequence of exposures, thoughts, feelings, and actions. To date, we have collected more than 350 million screenshots from 6-12 months of phone use from national samples of about 500 hundred adults and adolescents and their parents. Opportunities available to study the screenome to understand digital media use and its impacts on health and behavior,  develop novel diagnostics and prognostics from the screenome, and deliver precision interventions to improve health and well being. An opportunity to help build this paradigm-disrupting new science.

Joseph Wu

Cardiovascular Institute
Professor, Director
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Cardiovascular Institute

Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Our lab works on biological mechanisms of patient-specific and disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The main goals are to (i) understand basic cardiovascular disease mechanisms, (ii) accelerate drug discovery and screening, (iii) develop “clinical trial in a dish” concept, and (iv) implement precision cardiovascular medicine for prevention and treatment of patients. Our lab uses a combination of genomics, stem cells, cellular & molecular biology, physiological testing, and molecular imaging technologies to better understand molecular and pathophysiological processes.

Joseph Wu

Cardiovascular Institute
Professor & Director, Stanford Cardiovascular Institute
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Cardiovascular Institute

Last Updated: January 12, 2022

Joseph C. Wu, MD, PhD is Director of Stanford Cardiovascular Institute and Simon H. Stertzer, MD, Professor of Medicine and Radiology at Stanford University. His lab works on cardiovascular genomics and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The main goals are to (i) understand basic disease mechanisms, (ii) accelerate drug discovery and screening, (iii) develop “clinical trial in a dish” concept, and (iv) implement precision medicine for patients.

  • Mechanisms in Innovation in Vascular Disease
  • Multi-Disciplinary Training Program in Cardiovascular Imaging at Stanford
  • Training in Myocardial Biology at Stanford (TIMBS)

Sean Wu

Cardiovascular Institute
Associate Professor
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Cardiovascular Institute

Last Updated: August 12, 2020

My laboratory seeks to identify mechanisms responsible for human congenital heart disease, the most common cause of still-births in the U.S. and one of the major contributors to morbidity and mortality in infants and toddlers. We believe that by understanding the mechanisms regulating growth and differentiation of heart precursor stem/progenitor cells during early embryonic development we can then apply these principles to understand the pathogenesis heart malformation during fetal development and to leverage them for treating adult onset heart diseases such as heart failure and arrhythmia. We currently use both genetically-modified mice as our in vivo model to understand the biology of heart development as well as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as a in vitro model to study the process of heart cell formation. Our major areas of interests include cardiovascular developmental biology, disease modeling, tissue engineering, and regenerative biology. Within each of these areas we are particularly focused on understand the major genes that regulate the proper formation of heart chambers and the consequesnces of disrupting the normal expression of these genes and how that may lead to the development of congenital heart diseases. While mouse models are useful for studying the process of heart formation, they are not exactly like the human hearts in various ways. Since human heart fetal tissue are diffulty to obtain, we have chosen to use iPSCs derived from patients with particular congenital heart diseases to study steps involved in human heart malformation. Furthermore, to bring our work closer to treating heart disease patients, we have combined our expertise in stem cell biology with 3D biopring to make engineered functional heart tissue for screening drugs and to serve as replacement tissues for damaged heart muscles.

 

  • Mechanisms in Innovation in Vascular Disease
  • Other

Han Zhu

Cardiovascular Institute
Clinical Instructor (2023: Assistant Professor), Director, Stanford Translational Cardio-Oncology
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Cardiovascular Institute

Last Updated: February 13, 2023

Our lab is dedicated to discovering the underpinnings of immune-related diseases in the heart. Many cancer drugs may cause immune-related toxicity in the heart, including severe myocarditis, making it difficult for patients with cancer to get the life-saving treatments they need. We have previously discovered that several key types of immune cells may be involved in potentiating disease. We are currently performing experiments to pin down the underlying mechanisms of how immune cells may cause various inflammatory heart diseases. We use a combination of precision medicine-oriented techniques including single-cell RNA-seq, TCR-seq, and CyTOF as well as classical molecular biology, cell modeling and animal modeling to answer mechanistic questions about the pathogenesis of cardiac inflammatory diseases, with the goals of discovering therapeutic targets which can be brought to the patient bedside. 

 

 

  • Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Training Program
Med: Oncology
PRISM mentor Research Interests

Dean Felsher

Med: Oncology
Professor
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Med: Oncology

Last Updated: January 12, 2022

I am a Professor of Medicine-Oncology and Pathology and the Director of TRAM, ARTS and CTNT Programs.

My laboratory studies how oncogenes such as MYC initiate and maintain cancer.  In partic ular we have shown that shutting down oncogenes even for a brief time can revese cancer or elicit "Oncogene Addiction"  For a recent review of our work please see:

The MYC oncogene - the grand orchestrator of cancer growth and immune evasion Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology, 2022

Members of my laboratory are studying basic mechanisms of Oncogene Addiction, the role of Self-renewal/Stemness, Metabolism, Host Immune System, Protein 
Biogenesis, Microbiome, Extracellular Vesicles.  

We are developing novel therapuetics using small molecules, nanoparticles, proteins/peptides that can be used to target oncogenes and/or restore the immune response against cancer.

We are developing new diagnostic and imaging agents using PET, Mass Spec, Nanoproteomics, MIcrofluidics.

For recent examples of our work please see: Casey et al, Science, 2016; Gouw et al, Cell Metabolism, 2019; Dhanasekaran et al eLife, 2020; Swaminathan et al, Nat Comm 2020.

 

  • Cancer-Translational Nanotechnology Training Program (Cancer-TNT)
  • Molecular and Cellular Immunobiology
  • Stanford Cancer Imaging Training (SCIT) Program
  • Stanford Molecular Imaging Scholars (SMIS)
  • Training in Pediatric Nonmalignant Hematology and Stem Cell Biology

James Ford

Med: Oncology
Professor
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Med: Oncology

Last Updated: February 23, 2024

The focus of our research is understanding the role of genetic changes in cancer genes in the risk and development of common cancers and on manipulating DNA repair mechanisms for the prevention and treatment of cancer. Solid tumors often exhibit high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulting in oxidative damage and the generation of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), a common source of mutations and DNA damage in the cell. ROS can be generated by multiple mechanisms including activating RAS mutations, exposure to chemical carcinogens and ionizing reagents, or as a by-product of metabolic processes in the cell.  ROS likely impacts the initiation of BRCA-mutated triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) through the accumulation of mutations in the cell.  Up-regulating base excision repair (BER) pathways is a potentially viable approach to inhibiting tumorigenesis in BRCA-mutated individuals by reducing mutagenesis. We have identified small-molecule activators of BER and are exploring their mechanism of action and activity in cells and tumorogenesis models in mice. We are seeking a Postdoctoral scholar to work in this area who is
well-versed in tissue culture, cellular assays, and molecular biology techniques. Experience and a willingness to work with mice is preferred.

Haruka Itakura

Med: Oncology
Assistant Professor
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Med: Oncology

Last Updated: July 13, 2022

The Itakura Lab has an immediate opening for a creative and motivated postdoctoral scholar to conduct applied research in the areas of machine learning and pattern/feature detection with a focus on either computer vision/image or genomic/molecular data processing and analysis. The lab focuses on implementing machine learning frameworks and radiogenomic approaches on heterogeneous, multi-scale cancer data (e.g., clinical, imaging, histopathologic, genomic, transcriptomic, epigenomic, proteomic) to accelerate discoveries in cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Projects include prediction modeling of survival and treatment responses, biomarker (feature) discovery, cancer subtype discovery, and identification of new therapeutic targets. Guided by critical and relevant problems in oncology, these projects have the potential to lead to clinically actionable or translatable findings.


The successful candidate will join the Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology and work. The job description:

 

  • Build and implement algorithms in machine learning applied to either imaging data (computer vision) or genomic/molecular data (computational biology)
  • Develop software tools for integrative analysis of heterogeneous, multi-omic cancer data using machine learning
  • Publish and present research findings in journals and conferences


Required Qualifications:

 

  • PhD (or MD/PhD) in Computer Science, Engineering, Informatics, Statistics, Applied Physics, or a related field with strong skills in data mining, machine learning, or statistics
  • Experience in modeling, integrative analyses, parallel computing, and/or software development desirable
  • Biomedical knowledge or research experience is not a requisite
  • Demonstrated ability to work independently, problem-solve, author manuscripts, strive for innovation, and be highly self-motivated
  • Strong interpersonal and communication skills, and ability to work as part of a multi-disciplinary team

Ronald Levy

Med: Oncology
Professor
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Med: Oncology

Last Updated: June 23, 2022

We work on cancer and the immune system.

We make new monoclonal antibodies and vaccines against cancer

We to animal models of cancer immunotherapy

We conduct clinical trials in patients

We study biopsy samples from trial patients and analyze them by high dimensional single cell analysis techniques

  • Program in Translational and Experimental Hematology
  • Training Program in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

Rajat Rohatgi

Med: Oncology
Associate Professor
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Med: Oncology

Last Updated: July 14, 2022

Our lab uses cellular, biochemical, and genetic approaches to understand the mechanism by which developmental signaling pathways, such as the WNT and Hedgehog pathways, function and how they are damaged in disease states. We use a broad range of approaches in our work: genome-wide CRISPR screens, proteomics, imaging, and both protein and lipid biochemistry.

Rajat Rohatgi

Med: Oncology
Associate Professor
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Med: Oncology

Last Updated: July 14, 2022

A central focus of our laboratory is to uncover new regulatory mechanisms in cell-cell communication system, understand how these mechanisms are damaged in disease states and devise strategies to repair their function. We are actively recruiting post-doctoral fellows to join projects in the following areas:
--Signaling pathways implicated in birth defects, cancer and regeneration.
--Regulation of signaling and development by primary cilia.
--Genetic and biochemical dissection of lipid pathways that regulate signaling, development and cancer.
--The role of biomolecular condensates in cancer and cancer therapeutics.
We strive to provide a supportive, inclusive, organized and collaborative lab environment that maximizes the ability to tackle important biomedical problems. Career development is a priority. Nearly all prior lab members have obtained multiple publications and top-level competitive positions in academics or in the biotech industry.


Department URL:
https://biochemistry.stanford.edu/

Rajat Rohatgi

Med: Oncology
Associate Professor
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Med: Oncology

Last Updated: January 12, 2022

The overall goal of our laboratory is to uncover new regulatory mechanisms in signaling systems, to understand how these mechanisms are damaged in disease states and how to devise new new strategies to repair their function.  Specific areas are highlighted below:

1. The Hedgehog and WNT pathways, two cell-cell communication systems that regulate the formation of most tissues during development. These same pathways play central roles in tissue stem-cell function and organ regeneration in adults. Defects in these systems are associated with degenerative conditions and cancer.

2. Signal transduction at the primary cilium and the mechanism of cilia-associated human diseases. Primary cilia are solitary hair-like projections found on most cells in our bodies that function as critical hubs for signal transduction pathways (such as Hedgehog). Over fifty human genetic diseases, called “ciliopathies,” are caused by defects in cilia. Patients with ciliopathies can show phenotypes in nearly all organ systems, suffering from abnormalities ranging from birth defects to obesity.

3. Regulation of signaling pathways by endogenous lipids. The landscape of endogenous small-molecules and their biological functions remains a terra incognita, one that provides many opportunities to discover new regulatory layers in signaling pathways and other membrane dependent processes.

4. Biomolecular condensates in cancer and cancer therapeutics. The formation of reversible, membrane-less compartments in cells by the segregation of proteins into liquid phases, hydrogels or amyloid-like assemblies is an emerging principle of cellular organization. Emerging evidence shows that some cytotoxic drugs used in oncology can accumulate in and disrupt the biophysical properties of these condensates. A future challenge is to develop strategies to target such membraneless compartments (such as the nucleolus) for effective and safe cancer therapies.

5. Cellular adaptation to extreme tissue environments. Many cells in our bodies can be considered “extremophiles,” charged with maintaining homeostasis in the face of an environment containing markedly non-physiological concentrations of ions, small molecules and toxins. For instance, cells in the kidney medulla face tissue concentrations of ions, urea and other small molecules that are several-fold higher than blood.

Biomedical Data Sciences
PRISM mentor Research Interests

Andrew Gentles

Biomedical Data Sciences
Assistant professor
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Biomedical Data Sciences

Last Updated: January 12, 2022

Our research focus is in computational systems biology, primarily in cancer and more recently in neurodegenerative diseases.  We develop and apply methods to understand biological processes underlying disease, using high-throughput genomic and proteomic datasets and integrating them with phenotypes and clinical outcomes. A key interest is dissecting how the cellular composition and organization of tissues affects their behaviour in disease; and how these things might be targeted for therapy or diagnostic purposes. We collaborate with many wet lab and clinical groups at Stanford, including in the areas of cancer, immunology, and neuroscience.

Olivier Gevaert

Biomedical Data Sciences
Assistant Professor
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Biomedical Data Sciences

Last Updated: January 18, 2022

Vast amounts of molecular data characterizing the genome, epi-genome and transcriptome are becoming available for a wide range of complex disease such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, new computational tools for quantitatively analyzing medical and pathological images are creating new types of phenotypic data.  Now we have the opportunity to integrate the data at molecular, cellular and tissue scale to create a more comprehensive view of key biological processes underlying complex diseases. Moreover, this integration can have profound contributions toward predicting diagnosis and treatment. The Gevaert lab focuses on achieving progress in multi-scale modeling by tackling challenges in biomedical multi-scale data fusion. Applications are in the area of complex diseases with most projects in the lab focused on oncology, and possible new directions studying neuro-degenerative & cardiovascular diseases.

Olivier Gevaert

Biomedical Data Sciences
Associate Professor

Biomedical Data Sciences

Last Updated: January 23, 2024

Multi-omics, multi-modal, multi-scale data fusion for precision medicine

Vast amounts of biomedical data are now routinely available for patients ranging from sequencing of tissues to liquid biopsies. In addition, new computational tools for quantitatively analyzing radiographic images are now available. Multi-scale data is now available for complex diseases at molecular, cellular and tissue scale to establish a more comprehensive view of key biological processes. Intra and inter individual heterogeneities are often quoted as the main challenge for studying complex diseases. These heterogeneities exist at all scales, from microscopic to macroscopic. We develop multi-scale modeling approach to counter heterogeneity and uncover potentially untapped synergies between different data modalities by integrating information across spatial scales. Multi-scale modeling involves linking information from molecules, cells, tissues, and organs all the way to the organism and the population. We propose to use high dimensional molecular data with tissue scale image data to develop a statistical multi-scale modeling approach in the context of multi-modal & multi-scale modeling. Such modeling can contribute toward predicting diagnosis and treatment by revealing synergies and previously unappreciated relationships. Multi-scale modeling also can contribute to a more fundamental understanding of disease development and can reveal novel insights in how data at different scales are linked to each other.

Olivier Gevaert

Biomedical Data Sciences
Assistant Professor
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Biomedical Data Sciences

Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Multi-omics, multi-modal, multi-scale data fusion in complex diseases using machine learning

Aaron Newman

Biomedical Data Sciences
Assistant Professor
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Biomedical Data Sciences

Last Updated: June 02, 2022

Our group combines computational and experimental techniques to study the cellular organization of complex tissues, with a focus on determining the phenotypic diversity and clinical significance of tumor cell subsets. We have a particular interest in developing innovative data science tools that illuminate the cellular hierarchies and stromal elements that underlie tumor initiation, progression, and response to therapy. As part of this focus, we develop new algorithms to resolve cellular states and multicellular communities, tumor developmental hierarchies, and single-cell spatial relationships from genomic profiles of clinical biospecimens. Key results are further explored experimentally, both in our lab and through collaboration, with the goal of translating promising findings into the clinic.

As a member of the Department of Biomedical Data Science and the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, and as an affiliate of graduate programs in Biomedical Informatics, Cancer Biology, and Immunology, we are also interested in the development of impactful biomedical data science tools in areas beyond our immediate research focus, including developmental biology, regenerative medicine, and systems immunology.

Daniel Rubin

Biomedical Data Sciences
Professor of Biomedical Data Science, Radiology, and Medicine
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Biomedical Data Sciences

Last Updated: August 17, 2020

The QIAI lab focuses on cutting‐edge research at the intersection of imaging science and biomedical informatics, developing and applying AI methods to large amounts of medical data for biomedical discovery, precision medicine, and precision health (early detection and prediction of future disease). The lab develops novel methods in text and image analysis and AI, including multi-modal and multi-task learning, weak supervision, knowledge representation, natural language processing, and decision theory to tackle the challenges of leveraging medical Big Data. Our exciting work is bridging a spectrum of biomedical domains with multidisciplinary collaborations with top scientists at Stanford as well as with other institutions internationally. The QIAI lab provides a unique multidisciplinary environment for conducing innovative AI-based healthcare research with a strong record of scholarly publication and achievement. Core research topics in the laboratory include: (1) automated image annotation using unsupervised methods of processing associated radiology reports using word embeddings and related methods; (2) developing methods of analyzing longitudinal EMR data to predict clinical outcomes and best treatments, (3) creating multi-modal deep learning models integrating multi-dimensional EMR and other data to discover electronic phenotypes of disease, (4) developing AI models with noisy or sparse labels (weak supervision), and cross-modal, multi-task learning, and observational AI approaches, and (5) developing and implementing algorithms for distributed computation for training deep learning models that leverage multi-institutional data while avoiding the barriers to data sharing.

  • Stanford Cancer Imaging Training (SCIT) Program

Julia Salzman

Biomedical Data Sciences
Assistant Professor
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Biomedical Data Sciences

Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Statistical algorithms for genomics, RNA biology, splicing, cancer genomics, spatial transcriptomics

Nigam Shah

Biomedical Data Sciences
Associate Professor
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Biomedical Data Sciences

Last Updated: July 13, 2022

We analyze multiple types of health data (EHR, Claims, Wearables, Weblogs, and Patient blogs), to answer clinical questions, generate insights, and build predictive models for the learning health system. Our group runs the country's only bedside consult service to enable better medical decisions using aggregate EHR and Claims data at the point of care. Our team leads the Stanford Medicine Program for Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare, which makes predictions that allow taking mitigating actions, and studies the ethical implications of using machine learning in clinical care. We have built models for predicting future increases in cost, identifying slow healing wounds, missed diagnoses of depression and for improving palliative care.

  • Mechanisms in Innovation in Vascular Disease
  • Training Program in Adult and Pediatric Rheumatology
Med: Pulmonary & Critical Care Med
PRISM mentor Research Interests

Vinicio de Jesus Perez

Med: Pulmonary & Critical Care Med
Assistant Professor
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Med: Pulmonary & Critical Care Med

Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Several studies have now shown the importance of Wnt signaling for heart tissue repair in the left ventricle, but fewer studies have been done to understand Wnt’s role in right ventricle hypertrophy. The remodeling of the right ventricle during pulmonary hypertension leads to changes and impairment in the vasculature, cardiomyocyte dysfunction and fibrosis.  Our lab has shown the importance of Wnt signaling in pulmonary angiogenesis and we hypothesize that Wnt expression in the cardiac cells is critical to improve their response to the pressure load and with this, prevent heart failure. Using cardiac muscle cells and endothelial cells derived from healthy and idiopathic PH patients; we are screening and comparing the expression of several Wnts between the two groups in order to find Wnt candidates for our study. We aim to find a Wnt-associated gain of function in heart cells after injury during PH

Center for Biomedical Ethics
PRISM mentor Research Interests

Mildred Cho

Center for Biomedical Ethics
Associate Director
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Center for Biomedical Ethics

Last Updated: February 01, 2022

Stanford Training Program in Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications (ELSI) Research

  • Co-Principal Investigators and Program Co-Directors:  Mildred Cho, PhD, Holly Tabor, PhD
  • Funding source: NIH National Human Genome Research Institute
  • Appointment:  One year, renewable for up to three years
  • Qualifications: The NIH requires that candidates must have a PhD or MD (JD or Master’s degree only not accepted) prior to starting the fellowship, and be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident to be eligible for funding.  We are seeking candidates with a background in social science, ethics, philosophy, history, health services research, public policy or other related disciplines.

Job description: 

The postdoctoral fellow will conduct independent research on ethical, legal and social considerations arising from genetics and genomics.  The fellow will be part of an interdisciplinary community including faculty and fellows from this program and other affiliated programs. Fellows are expected to gain practical experience in professional activities through programs such as the Stanford Benchside Ethics Consultation Service, a research ethics consultation program to assist life sciences researchers in the resolution of ethical concerns in their research, one of the Stanford-affiliated clinical ethics consultation services, and/or teaching.

In addition to participating in SCBE and CIRGE activities, fellows will have access to a full range of courses at Stanford University, which includes genetics, social science, humanities and law courses.  It is expected that the fellow may need formal coursework in genetics, ethics, or ELSI research methods.  Mentors will assist the fellow in formulating an individualized curriculum and career strategies.  All trainees will be expected to present their research in scholarly venues.  Fellowship support includes a stipend, tuition, and health insurance. Funds will be provided by the fellowship for each fellow to travel to one meeting per year.

For more information, please see our website

  • The Stanford Training Program in ELSI Research

David Magnus

Center for Biomedical Ethics
Director, Professor
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Center for Biomedical Ethics

Last Updated: November 11, 2021

The Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics (SCBE) is an interdisciplinary hub for faculty who do research, teaching, and service on topics in bioethics and medical humanities. SCBE researchers have pioneered new approaches to studying the ethical issues presented by new technologies in biomedicine, including Artificial Intelligence, CRISPR and Gene Therapy, Stem Cell Research, Synthetic Biology, and the Human Brain Initiative. To benefit patients, SCBE has undertaken novel, ground-breaking research to improve clinical care, including end of life care, communication between patients and physicians, care for disabled patients, and organ transplantation processes. SCBE offers postdoctoral fellowships in Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications (ELSI) Research and Clinical Ethics. We currently have an opening for a postdoctoral fellow in Clinical Ethics. View more information here. 

Med: Hematology
PRISM mentor Research Interests

Ravi Majeti

Med: Hematology
Professor
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Med: Hematology

Last Updated: August 16, 2020

The Majeti lab focuses on the molecular/genomic characterization and therapeutic targeting of leukemia stem cells in human hematologic malignancies, particularly acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In parallel, the lab also investigates normal human hematopoiesis and hematopoietic stem cells. Our lab uses experimental hematology methods, stem cell assays, genome editing, and bioinformatics to define and investigate drivers of leukemia stem cell behavior. As part of these studies, we have led the development and application of robust xenotransplantation assays for both normal and malignant human hematopoietic cells. A major focus of the lab is the investigation of pre-leukemic hematopoietic stem cells in human AML.

  • Cancer Etiology, Prevention, Detection and Diagnosis
  • Program in Translational and Experimental Hematology
  • Training in Pediatric Nonmalignant Hematology and Stem Cell Biology
  • Training Program in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation
Med: Infectious Diseases
PRISM mentor Research Interests

Catherine Blish

Med: Infectious Diseases
Professor
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Med: Infectious Diseases

Last Updated: November 11, 2021

My lab is focused on understanding host-pathogen interactions with a particular focus on innate immune responses. We apply omics approaches to dissect these interactions, performing in vivo profiling and building in vitro systems to define host-pathogen interactions. We have a particular passion for understanding the mechanisms by which NK cells recognize and respond to pathogens. We currently have projects evaluating immunity to SARS-CoV-2, HIV, influenza, and tuberculosis.

Department URL:
https://medicine.stanford.edu/

  • Applied Genomics in Infectious Diseases
  • Molecular and Cellular Immunobiology

Shirit Einav

Med: Infectious Diseases
Associate Professor
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Med: Infectious Diseases

Last Updated: January 12, 2022

Our basic research program focuses on understanding the roles of virus-host interactions in viral infection and disease pathogenesis via both molecular and systems virology/immunology single cell approaches. This program is combined with translational efforts to apply this knowledge for the development of broad-spectrum host-centered antiviral approaches to combat emerging viral infections, including dengue, encephalitic alphaviruses, SARS-CoV-2 and Ebola, and means to predict disease progression.

Our studies focus on the following emerging concepts that are transforming our understanding of virus-host interactions:

1. Understanding the pathogenesis of flaviviral infections via an integrative systems immunology single cell approach. The goal of this project is to elucidate the cellular and molecular factors contributing to increased severity of dengue and Zika disease in distinct patient populations (children, adults, pregnant women). To achieve this goal, we are advancing and utilizing various single-cell immunological approaches (virus-inclusive single cell RNA-seq, CyTOF etc) and samples from our large Colombia dengue cohort (>500 patients) and Zika cohort. We are mapping an atlas of viral immune cellular targets and studying critical protective and pathogenic elements of the host response to these viruses in multiple distinct infected and bystander cell subtypes with an unprecedented resolution. The translational goals of this project are to identify candidate biomarkers associated with infection outcome and candidate targets for antiviral therapy, as well as improve vaccine strategies.

2. Deciphering the intracellular membrane trafficking pathways essential for viral pathogens. We have used proteomic and genetic approaches to identify proteins that are critical for the replication of multiple globally relevant RNA viruses including dengue virus, Zika virus, encephalitis alphaviruses, SARS-CoV-2, hepatitis C virus, and Ebola virus. We are studying the molecular mechanisms by which these viruses hijack intracellular membrane trafficking pathways for mediating key steps in their viral life cycle and are characterizing the roles these factors play in cellular biology using viruses as complexed probes. Ongoing work focuses on the roles of cellular kinases and adaptor protein complexes in viral trafficking during viral entry, assembly, release, and direct cell-to-cell spread, the role of the ESCRT machinery in intracellular viral budding, and the roles of ubiquitin signaling pathways in the regulation of trafficking during viral assembly and release.

3. Advancing the development of small molecules targeting host functions as broad-spectrum antivirals. Most direct antiviral strategies targeting viral enzymes provide a “one drug, one bug” approach and are associated with the emergence of viral resistance. We have discovered several host functions exploited by multiple viruses as targets for broad-spectrum antivirals. We have demonstrated the utility of a repurposed approach that inhibits these factors in suppressing replication of multiple RNA viruses both in vitro and in mouse models and are advancing this approach into the clinic and studying its mechanism of action. In parallel, we are developing chemically distinct small molecules targeting various cellular functions as pharmacological tools to study cell biology and viral infection and as broad-spectrum antivirals to combat SARS-CoV-2, dengue virus, encephalitic alphaviruses and Ebola virus.

  • Clinical Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases

Stephen Luby

Med: Infectious Diseases
Professor
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Med: Infectious Diseases

Last Updated: August 09, 2021

Dr. Luby’s research group is engaged in several efforts to generate knowledge that will alter the way that bricks are manufactured across South Asia so that they generate less air pollution, less climate change and tens of thousands fewer deaths per year. This involves: 1) evaluating interventions to improve combustion efficiency within brick kilns and so simultaneously reduce coal costs for producers while generating less pollution 2) using remote sensing to specify the location of brick kilns and ultimately evaluate their emissions.

Another strand of his work looks at the release of lead into the environment in low and middle income countries, seeks to identify the sources of lead that is generating the greatest public health burden and develops and evaluates interventions to reduce this burden.

His research group also explores practical interventions to reduce infectious disease transmission in low and middle income countries. These activities include efforts to maximize the uptake of masks, water treatment and vaccines with careful evaluation of the impact of these interventions. His research group explores strategies to reduce the risk of pathogen transmission in healthcare facilities in lower income countries.

  • Applied Genomics in Infectious Diseases
  • Clinical Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases

Julie Parsonnet

Med: Infectious Diseases
Professor
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Med: Infectious Diseases

Last Updated: January 27, 2022

Dr. Parsonnet is an Infectious Diseases epidemiologist and clinician.  The Parsonnet lab works to understand how infectious agents influence the development of chronic diseases.  During the COVID crisis, the lab has also been actively involved in a wide range of investigations of this disease ranging from large seroepidemiologic studies to novel treatment trials to collaborative studies on COVID immunology.  Studies that could potentially take a fellow include:

  • Large seroepidemiologic, longitudinal studies of COVID in the counties throughout California both before and after the initiation of vaccines.   We have collected data sets that allow us to understand risk factors for breakthrough infections,  how vaccination and other interventions change behavior,  and the role of natural infection in building immunity.
  • Studies on COVID infection, immunity and vaccination in patients receiving dialysis
  • A clinical trial of camostat, a TMPPRS2 blocker, that prevents SARS-CoV2 from entering cells.
  • Studies that define the normal human body temperature in children and adults
  • Research on how skin care in babies varies across populations and how this influences skin integrity and development of allergic diseases later in life (with Kari Nadeau).
  • Studies on the development of the pediatric virome, microbiome and immunome in the first three years of life.
  • Clinical Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases

Julie Parsonnet

Med: Infectious Diseases
Professor
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Med: Infectious Diseases

Last Updated: January 27, 2023

I am an infectious diseases physician and epidemiologist    OUr lab is well know internationally in two major areas:  1.  The role of infections in chronic diseases and 2.  Physiologic changes in humans over time, specifically the decrease in human body temperature.  3. Novel surveillance projects, especially serosurveys done through the mail and  the use of wastewater to track infections.  Right now, projects that could integrate a post-doctoral fellow include:  In addition, my research group works on gun violence prevention.  

1.  Analysis of a California population-based serosurvey on SARS-COV2 infection, including information on human behaviors (mask wearing, social , vaccination) and demographics (age, race, education),  We could expand this study to look at other infectious diseases as well.

2.  Research assessing the association between high normal body temperature and longevity.

3.  Gun violence prevention.  Gun violence is a national tragedy.  We have two major projects in this area:

     a.  A project with Santa Clara County Department of Public health that combines the many data sources on gun violence across the county (Police, hospitals,EMT, schools, health departments), bring together stakeholders at community organizations across the county fighting gun violence and work with health care workers to identify strategies to educate patients on gun violence prevention.

     b.  Educational project development to teach physicians across the county how to talk to patients about gun violence

  • Applied Genomics in Infectious Diseases
  • Clinical Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases
  • Training grant in academic gastroenterology

David Relman

Med: Infectious Diseases
Professor
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Med: Infectious Diseases

Last Updated: July 14, 2022

The primary research focus of the Relman Lab is the human indigenous microbiota (microbiome), and in particular, the nature and mechanisms of variation in patterns of microbial diversity within the human body as a function of time (microbial succession), space (biogeography within the host landscape), and in response to perturbation, e.g., antibiotics (community robustness and resilience). One of the goals of this work is to define the role of the human microbiome in health and disease. We are particularly interested in measuring and understanding resilience in the human microbial ecosystem. Our work includes the human oral cavity, gut, and female reproductive tract, as well as an analysis of microbial diversity in marine mammals. This research integrates theory and methods from ecology, population biology, environmental microbiology, genomics and clinical medicine.

  • Applied Genomics in Infectious Diseases

Upi Singh

Med: Infectious Diseases
Professor
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Med: Infectious Diseases

Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Singh lab - basic and translational science for parasitic amebic pathogens including gene expression, developmental control and identification of new drug regimens.

  • Applied Genomics in Infectious Diseases
Geballe Lab for Adv Mat
PRISM mentor Research Interests

Andrew Mannix

Geballe Lab for Adv Mat
Assistant Professor
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Geballe Lab for Adv Mat

Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Building synthetic solids with atomic precision from layered sheets and other nanomaterials. Scanning probe characterization of atomic-scale electronic and opto-electronic phenomena. 2D materials and thin film growth.

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