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PRISM Mentors

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PRISM supports all faculty in recruiting postdocs. The faculty listed on this page have expressed special interest in the PRISM program and may be actively recruiting. This is one of many ways to identify potential postdoc mentors; also review the guidance and links in the PRISM Application Guide for other ways to explore Stanford faculty. As you look for potential postdoc mentors, consider how faculty research interests align with your own.

 

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PRISM mentor Research Interests

Capucine Van Rechem

Pathology
Assistant Professor
View in Stanford Profiles


Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Chromatin regulators are highly altered in diseases. Of interest, these proteins are easily targetable by drugs. Furthermore, the plasticity of epigenetic events makes them a powerful target for new therapeutic strategies and reversion of disease phenotype. Histone and DNA modifications influence many processes including transcription, replication, genomic stability and cell division, which are altered in diseases. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of chromatin modifiers in both normal and pathological cells could help us frame new potential biomarkers and targeted therapies. My long-term interest lies in understanding the impact chromatin modifiers have on disease development and progression so that more optimal therapeutic opportunities can be achieved. My laboratory explores the direct molecular impact of chromatin-modifying enzymes during cell cycle progression, and characterizes the unappreciated and unconventional roles that these chromatin factors have on cytoplasmic function such as protein synthesis. By gaining molecular understanding into the mechanism of action of chromatin modifiers in normal and pathological cells, we will improve our basic knowledge and provide needed insights into new potential targeted therapies in diseases.

Capucine Van Rechem

Pathology
Assistant Professor
View in Stanford Profiles


Last Updated: November 29, 2021

Chromatin regulators are highly altered in diseases. Of interest, these proteins are easily targetable by drugs. Furthermore, the plasticity of epigenetic events makes them a powerful target for new therapeutic strategies and reversion of disease phenotype. Histone and DNA modifications influence many processes including transcription, replication, genomic stability and cell division, which are altered in diseases. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of chromatin modifiers in both normal and pathological cells could help us frame new potential biomarkers and targeted therapies. My long-term interest lies in understanding the impact chromatin modifiers have on disease development and progression so that more optimal therapeutic opportunities can be achieved. My laboratory explores the direct molecular impact of chromatin-modifying enzymes during cell cycle progression, and characterizes the unappreciated and unconventional roles that these chromatin factors have on cytoplasmic function such as protein synthesis. By gaining molecular understanding into the mechanism of action of chromatin modifiers in normal and pathological cells, we will improve our basic knowledge and provide needed insights into new potential targeted therapies in diseases.

 

Department URL:
https://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=stanford+department+of+pathology&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

Ellen Yeh

Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology
Associate Professor


Last Updated: July 12, 2022

Environmental microbiology (e.g. diatoms, algae) and synthetic biology

Topics: Nitrogen fixation, lipid biosynthesis and transprot, cellular endosymbiosis, nonmodel organisms

Application areas: Fertilizers, Biofuels

Ellen Yeh

Biochemistry, Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology
Associate Professor
View in Stanford Profiles


Last Updated: July 14, 2022

The Yeh Lab studies the apicoplast, a unique plastid organelle in Plasmodium falciparum parasites that cause malaria. We are particularly focused on unbiased chemical and genetic screens to discover new cell biology and therapeutic targets for this important global health disease. Our work highlights the untapped opportunities in exploring divergent biology in non-model organisms, a theme we plan to expand in the lab by studying ocean algae (malaria's cousins!) and their role in the global ecosystem.

  • Molecular Basis of Host Parasite Interaction

Glaivy Batsuli

Pediatrics
Assistant Professor
View in Stanford Profiles


Last Updated: October 02, 2023

The Batsuli Lab focuses on elucidating mechanisms of the immune response to blood coagulation proteins deficient in patients with inherited bleeding disorders, specifically hemophilia. Hemophilia is a rare bleeding disorders caused by low or absent clotting proteins factor VIII or factor IX that affects an individual's risk of bleeding. Our lab seeks to better understand the interaction of factor proteins with antigen presenting cells that result in antibody development against factor replacement therapies in order to develop therapeutic strategies that evade these immune responses and induce tolerance. The Batsuli Lab supports a collaborative and supportive research environment that engages in team science.

Daniel Bernstein

Pediatrics
Professor and Associate Dean


Last Updated: August 17, 2020

Our lab has several major foci:


1. Using iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes to develop a better understanding of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and congenital heart disease.
2. The role of alterations in mitochondrial structure and function in normal physiology and in diseases such as dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.
3. Single cell analysis of mitochondrial function reveals significant heterogeneity.

 

Specific projects underway in our lab include:

1. Using CRISPR-edited iPSC-cardiomyocytes to understand the mechanisms of cardiomyopathies and to solve the genotype-phenotype conundrum in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

2. The role of altered metabolism and mitochondrial function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

3. Alterations of mitochondrial structure and function, including processes of mitofusion, mitofission, autophagy and mitophagy, in normal physiology and disease.

4. Development of high-throughput single cell imaging technologies to measure single cell mitochondrial function, and to measure single mitochondrial function to determine the role of heterogeneity in cell life-death decision-making.

5. Development of micro-engineered platforms for assessment of biomechanics of single iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes.

 

We also are interested in clinical heart failure and cardiac transplantation in children, specifically:

1. Understanding alterations in immune system function in patients with after implantation of a left ventricular assist device, Immune system biomarkers that predict adverse outcomes after pediatric VAD implantation.

2. Understanding alterations in immune system function in children with heart failure before and after heart transplant.

3. Development of biomarkers for the detection and monitoring of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in pediatric solid organ transplant patients.

  • Training in Myocardial Biology at Stanford (TIMBS)

Daniel Bernstein

Pediatrics
Professor and Associate Dean
View in Stanford Profiles


Last Updated: February 01, 2023

Our lab has several major focuses:
1. Using iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes to develop a better understanding of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and congenital heart disease.
2. The role of alterations in mitochondrial structure and function in normal physiology (such as exercise) and in disease such as dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.
3. Single cell analysis of mitochondrial function reveals significant heterogeneity.
4. Differences between right and left ventricular responses to stress and in their modes of failure, including gene expression and miR regulation.
5. Use of iPSC-CMs in pharmacogenomics, specifically determining the role of gene variants in doxorubicin cardiotoxicity.

Specific projects underway in our lab include:

1. Alterations of mitochondrial structure and function, including processes of mitofusion, mitofission, autophagy and mitophagy, in normal physiology and disease.

2. Development of high-throughput single cell imaging technologies to measure single cell mitochondrial function, and to measure single mitochondrial function to determine the role of heterogeneity in cell life-death decision-making.

3. Differences between the right and left ventricles in their responses to stresses such as increased afterload and increased preload, including gene expression and gene regulation by micro-RNAs. The use of plasma miRs as biomakers for RV failure.

4. Using patient-derived iPSC-cardiomyocytes to understand the mechanisms of cardiomyopathies common in children and to solve the genotype-phenotype conundrum in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The role of altered metabolism and mitochondrial function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

5. Development of micro-engineered platforms for assessment of biomechanics of single iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes.

6. Developing tools to further mature hiPSC-CMs to more accurately recapitulate the mechanobiology of adult human CMS.

We also are interested in clinical heart failure and cardiac transplantation in children, specifically:

1. Understanding alterations in immune system function in patients with after implantation of a left ventricular assist device, Immune system biomarkers that predict adverse outcomes after pediatric VAD implantation.

2. Development of biomarkers for the detection and monitoring of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in pediatric transplant patients.

  • Training in Myocardial Biology at Stanford (TIMBS)

Suzan Carmichael

Pediatrics, Maternal Fetal Medicine and Obstetrics
Professor
View in Stanford Profiles


Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Dr. Carmichael is a perinatal and nutritional epidemiologist and Professor of Pediatrics and Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Her research focuses on finding ways to improve maternal and infant health. Exposure themes include nutrition, social context, care, environmental contaminants and genetics. Outcome themes include severe maternal morbidity, stillbirth, birth defects, and preterm delivery. She is particularly interested in understanding the intersectionality of these varied types of exposures and outcomes and how they interact to impact health and health disparities, for the mother-baby dyad, in domestic as well as global health settings. She currently (mid 2020) has an opening in her lab for a post-doc focused on maternal health.

SUZAN CARMICHAEL

Pediatrics, Maternal Fetal Medicine and Obstetrics, Epidemiology and Population Health
PROFESSOR
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Last Updated: January 29, 2023

Our team is committed to finding ways to improve maternal and infant health outcomes and equity by leading research that identifies effective leverage points for change, from upstream 'macro' social and structural factors, to downstream 'micro' clinical factors through a collaborative research approach that integrates epidemiologic approaches with community engagement and systems thinking.

Disparities are prominent in maternal and infant health, so a lot of our work is centered on equity.  Focusing on highest-risk groups will improve health for everyone.

Much of our current research focuses on severe maternal morbidity (SMM). SMM encompasses adverse conditions that put pregnant people at risk of short and long-term consequences related to labor and delivery, including death.

We also study other important perinatal outcomes, including stillbirth, preterm birth, structural congenital malformations and other maternal morbidities.  We are interested in these outcomes individually, as well as in how they are connected to each other -- from a mechanistic standpoint (ie, do they share the same causes), and a lifecourse perspective (eg, how does an adverse newborn outcome affect the mom's postpartum health, and vice versa).

Dr. Carmichael's training is in perinatal and nutritional epidemiology.  She deeply appreciates her multi-disciplinary colleagues who make this work more meaningful by bringing their own varied perspectives and lived experiences, and their expertise in clinical care, qualitative and mixed methods, community engagement, and state-of-the-art epidemiologic approaches and biostatistical methods.

Danny Chou

Pediatrics
Assistant Professor
View in Stanford Profiles


Last Updated: February 01, 2022

Our research program integrates concepts of chemical biology, protein engineering and structure biology to design new therapeutic leads and generate probes to study biological processes. A key focus of our lab is insulin, an essential hormone in our body to reduce blood glucose levels. We generate synthetic libraries of insulin analogs to select for chemical probes, and investigate natural insulin molecules (e.g. from the venom of fish-hunting cone snails!) to develop novel therapeutic candidates. We are especially interested in using chemical and enzymatic synthesis to create novel chemical entities with enhanced properties, and leverage the strong expertise of our collaborators to apply our skill sets in the fields of cancer biology, immunology and pain research. Our ultimate goal is to translate our discovery into therapeutic interventions in human diseases.

  • Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism

Agnieszka Czechowicz

Pediatrics, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med
Assistant Professor
View in Stanford Profiles


Last Updated: February 01, 2022

The lab's current research is aimed primarily at understanding how hematopoietic stem cells interact with their microenvironment in order to subsequently modulate these interactions to ultimately improve bone marrow transplantation and unlock biological secrets that further enable regenerative medicine broadly. We are primarily focused on studying the cell surface receptors on hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and bone marrow stromal cells, and are actively learning how manipulating these can alter cell state and cell fate.  We have also pioneered several antibody-based conditioning methods that are at various stages of clinical development to enable safer stem cell transplantation.

There are many exciting opportunities that stem from this work across a variety of disease states ranging from rare genetic diseases, autoimmune diseases, solid organ transplantation, microbiome and cancer. While we are primarily focused on blood and immune diseases, the expanded potential of this work is much broader and can be applied to other organ systems as well and we are very eager to develop collaborations across disease areas. The Czechowicz lab hopes to further add in the field of translation research.

Goals
We aim to increase our understanding of the basic science principles that govern these cells and then exploit these findings to develop improved therapies for patients
We are particularly focused on pediatric non-malignant bone marrow transplantation with a strong interest in genetic blood/immune diseases and bone marrow failure, but do complementry work on solid tumors with marrow disease, solid organ tolerance induction, autoimmune diseases and gene therapy/gene editing.

  • Program in Translational and Experimental Hematology

Kara Davis

Pediatrics, Ped: Hematology-Oncology
Assistant Professor
View in Stanford Profiles


Last Updated: August 15, 2023

The Davis laboratory is looking for post-doctoral scholars interested in the study of cancer. We use single-cell, high-dimensional approaches in primary patient materials to identify cells associated with poor clinical outcomes. We have a focus on childhood leukemia, neuroblastoma and Ewing sarcoma. Once identified, we can further interrogate mechanisms of resistance in candidate cell populations and develop new approaches for treatment. 

We are looking for motivated and talented computational biologists and cancer biologists with interest in joining our active group. In particular, opportunties for data scientists/computational biologists are available. 

 

Elizabeth Egan

Pediatrics, Microbiology and Immunology
Assistant Professor
View in Stanford Profiles


Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Malaria is one of the leading causes of childhood morbidity and mortality in the world. The etiologic agent of severe malaria, Plasmodium falciparum, exclusively infects red blood cells during the blood stage of its life cycle, when all of the symptoms of malaria occur. P. falciparum is an obligate intracellular parasite, suggesting that it critically depends on host factors for its biology and pathogenesis. This concept is also supported by population genetic studies, which indicate that humans have evolved certain red cell traits, such as hemoglobinopathies, to protect against malaria. The importance of these host-pathogen interactions raises the possibility that critical red cell factors could serve as targets for new, host-directed therapeutics for malaria. However, our understanding of host determinants for malaria is limited because red cells are enucleated and lack DNA, hindering genetic manipulation. In the Egan laboratory we have surmounted this hurdle by adapting advances from stem cell biology to the study of malaria host factors. Specifically, we have developed approaches to differentiate primary human CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells down the erythroid lineage to enucleated red blood cells that can be infected by P. falciparum. This thus gives us access to the nucleated progenitor cells for genetic modification using RNAi and CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing. We are using these methods to develop forward genetic screens to identify novel host factors for malaria, as well as to perform mechanistic studies to understand the specific functions of critical host factors during the developmental cycle of malaria parasites. In addition, the lab has projects focused on understanding human adaptation to malaria using clinical samples. Our long term goal is to explore the possibility of host-directed therapeutics for malaria.

  • Molecular Basis of Host Parasite Interaction
  • Training in Pediatric Nonmalignant Hematology and Stem Cell Biology

Heidi Fedlman

Pediatrics
Professor
View in Stanford Profiles


Last Updated: July 13, 2022

My research focuses on the neurobiological basis of language, reading, and cognition in children.  Functional imaging studies demonstrate that language and reading skills require the integrated activity of a network of distributed brain regions.  Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) documents that variations in the properties of long-range white matter pathways connecting these brain regions within the cerebrum and between the cerebrum and cerebellum are associated with variations in language and reading skills.  These white matter pathways may be disturbed in childhood illnesses, such as brain tumors. We have been collecting dMRI scans on children born preterm and full term at different ages, including infancy.  We also have been collecting clinical scans on children with brain tumors in the cerebellum and posterior fossa. We seek students who want to learn techniques for analyzing dMRI and related imaging methods in children and to link the neurobiological findings to clinical outcomes.  Selected studies include: (1) analyzing white matter pathways in preterm infants at near term age in relation to medical and environmental variables; (2) applying spherical deconvolution to scans of children age 6 to 8 years who are learning to read; (3) evaluating longitudinal change in children with mutism after resection of a posterior fossa brain tumor.

Casey Gifford

Pediatrics, Genetics
Assistant Professor
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Last Updated: April 27, 2021

The Gifford lab is focused on defining the complex genetic and molecular mechanisms that are necessary for faithful cardiovascular development and how perturbation of these mechanisms can lead to disease. We use both stem cell and rodent experimental models to:

  • characterize the cellular interactions involved in cardiovascular development
  • define the oligogenic mechanisms underlying congenital heart diseases, such as hypoplastic left heart syndrome and left ventricular noncompaction
  • explore the link between congenital heart disease and neurodevelopmental delay

We also collaborate closely with clinicians, for example on a project integrating cardiac imaging and genetic data to predict adverse cardiac outcomes. Ultimately, we hope to make personalized medicine a reality for those that suffer from CHD and associated comorbidities, such as autism.

Anna Gloyn

Pediatrics, Genetics
Professor
View in Stanford Profiles


Last Updated: January 29, 2022

We aim to understand the genetic basis of diabetes and related metabolic conditions and to use this to leverage a better understanding of what causes diabetes and how we can improve treatment options for patients. Our work is predominantly focused on understanding what causes pancreatic islets to release insufficient insulin to control blood glucose levels after a meal in patients with type 2 diabetes, but often extends to efforts to relate this to metabolic dysfunction in other relevant tissues such as fat and liver.

We are an inter-disciplinary team of basic and clinical scientists with shared interests in using molecular genetics as a tool to uncover novel biology. We use a variety of different approaches to address important challenges in the field, which range from studies that work genome wide to those which are focused on specific genes and even precise nucleotide changes to understand their impact on pancreatic islet biology.

We have developed a series of pipelines that use primary human islets and authentic beta-cell models which allow us to generate and then integrate complex genomic, transcriptomic and cellular datasets. We use state-of-the art genome engineering approaches combined with induced pluripotent stem-cells to study the impact of T2D-associated genetic variants on islet cell development and function. We are also funded to investigate the impact of T2D risk variants on pancreatic beta-cell function in vivo.

We are a highly collaborative team and work with multiple national and international consortia involved in efforts to understand the genetic basis of type 2 diabetes (eg DIAGRAM, NIDDK Funded Accelerated Medicines Partnership) and related glycaemic traits (MAGIC). We are also part of several Innovative Medicines Initiatives (IMIs) efforts including STEMBANCC and RHAPSODY and Horizon 2020 initiatives (eg T2DSYSTEMS), which are working to develop tools and frameworks to capitalize on genetic and genomic data.

We are also part of the NIDDK funded Human Islet Research Network (HIRN) where we play a role in two of their initiatives. The Human Pancreas Atlas Program- T2 (HPAP-T2D) and the Integrated Islet Phenotype Program (IIPP). Our role is to support the genetic and genomic characterization of islets which are distributed for research and to support the genomic characterization of the pancreas’ phenotyped within the HPAP-T2D program.

Our work extends to playing a role in the interpretation of genetic variants identified in genes with known roles in monogenic forms of diabetes. We are part of the Clin Gen Expert Review Panel for Monogenic Diabetes where are expertise contributes to interpretation of coding alleles in glucokinase (GCK) and Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1 alpha (HNF1A). We are a number of on-going projects which are supporting efforts to better understand how to use exome-sequencing data in a diagnostic setting.

  • Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism
  • Institutional Training Grant in Genome Science

Maria Grazia Roncarolo

Pediatrics, Med: Bone Marrow Transplant, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med
Professor
View in Stanford Profiles


Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Roncarolo laboratory is exploring the basic biology and translational applications of human type 1 regulatory cells (Tr1). We are using engineered Tr1, ex vivo Tr1, and alloantigen-specific Tr1 to uncover the molecular frameworks that govern Tr1 identity, differentiation and function. We are also translating Tr1 into the clinic. First, Tr1 can be used as a supportive cell therapy to enhance stem cell engraftment and immune reconstitution after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Alloantigen-specific Tr1, designed to prevent graft-vs-host disease (GvHD) after allogeneic HSCT, are already being tested in a phase I/II clinical trial (NCT03198234). Second, we are investigating the mechanisms of action and clinical potential of the engineered Tr1 called CD4(IL-10) or LV-10, generated by lentiviral transduction of CD4 T cells with IL10 gene. Besides their immunosuppressive and anti-GvHD properties, LV-10 lyse primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells and delay myeloid leukemia progression in vivo. We are exploring LV-10 as a novel cell immunotherapy for AML. Finally, we are interested in curing inborn errors of immunity by stem cell transplantation or autologous stem cell gene correction. We are testing a gene editing strategy to correct pathogenic mutations in IL10 and IL10 receptor genes, which cause severe and debilitating VEO-IBD (very early onset inflammatory bowel disease) in infants and young children.

  • Training in Pediatric Nonmalignant Hematology and Stem Cell Biology

Mark A. Kay

Pediatrics
Professor
View in Stanford Profiles


Last Updated: November 09, 2021

The Kay lab is interested in Gene Transfer, Genome Editing and Non-coding RNA biology.  The current research is studying: 1) rAAV vectors specifically:   developing capsid libraries, chemical modification of  vectors and screening approaches that will provide improved vectors for human application;  molecular mechanism of discordance in vector transduction between species;  molecular mechanisms involved in AAV transduction;  and chromatin formation of gene transfer vector genomes in primary tissues. 2) Approaches to achieve therapeutic levels of  non-nuclease mediated genome editing using rAAV vectors.  3)  Non coding RNAs: association between long-non coding RNAs and miRNA biogenesis in whole tissues;  tRNA derived small RNAs and their role in regulating ribosome biogenesis in cancer; and role of Line1 structural RNAs in controlling gene expression.

  • Institutional Training Grant in Genome Science

Christin Kuo

Pediatrics
Assistant Professor
View in Stanford Profiles


Last Updated: March 25, 2021

We study the development and function of specialized sensory and secretory cells in the lung called pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNECs). We apply genetic single cell labeling studies in vivo as well as single RNA sequencing to identify the molecular basis of their developmental migration and functional specialization.  We recently identified dozens of neuropeptides expressed by individual neuroendocrine cells and aim to understand the functional consequences of the secreted products and their targets both within the lung. We have collaborations with the thoracic team at Stanford Medical Center to investigate a spectrum of lung neuroendocrine tumors as well as pediatric lung diseases associated with abnormal PNECs. We welcome new members to or research team who enjoy working in a multidisciplinary, diverse, and collaborative research environment.

  • Stanford Training Program in Lung Biology

Henry Lee

Pediatrics
Associate Professor
View in Stanford Profiles


Last Updated: August 07, 2020

We are seeking an individual for a postdoctoral fellowship in perinatal / neonatal health who has training and experience in epidemiology or a related field (e.g. PhD or MD with relevant research training). The primary mentor is Dr. Henry C. Lee, Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology), and Chief Medical Officer of the California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative (CPQCC) . The CPQCC and its sister organization, the California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative (CMQCC) have their data centers and leadership based at the division of neonatology at Stanford, and have active research programs in perinatal health. The ability to link maternal, neonatal, and long-term follow-up data allow for opportunities to conduct large population-based epidemiologic studies, health services research, and work in reducing disparities. The emphasis of this fellowship will be on the population of extremely preterm birth, including prediction / modeling of outcomes for periviable infants, and development of tools for counseling families affected by extremely preterm birth. The postdoctoral fellow will collaborate with epidemiologists, biostatisticians, and clinician-scientists, with opportunities for mentorship and collaborative research on related topics.

Alison Marsden

Pediatrics, Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, Cardiovascular Med Institute
Associate Professor
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Last Updated: August 09, 2020

The Cardiovascular Biomechanics Computation Lab  develops fundamental computational methods for the study of cardiovascular disease progression, surgical methods, treatment planning and medical devices.  We focus on patient-specific modeling in pediatric and congenital heart disease, as well as adult cardiovascular disease.  Our lab bridges engineering and medicine through the departments of Pediatrics, Bioengineering, and the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering. We develop the SimVascular open source project.

  • Mechanisms in Innovation in Vascular Disease
  • Multi-Disciplinary Training Program in Cardiovascular Imaging at Stanford

Marlene Rabinovitch

Pediatrics
Professor


Last Updated: April 22, 2021

The laboratory of Dr. Marlene Rabinovitch, Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology) is seeking a highly-motivated and accomplished postdoctoral scholar to join their team of investigators  in conjunction with the Basic Science and Engineering (BASE) Initiative  of the Children’s Heart Center at Stanford University.

A successful applicant will be immersed in cutting-edge molecular, sequencing, imaging and high throughput ‘omics’  technologies applied to human vascular and immune cells  and in their application  to mouse and rat models of  human vascular disease with a focus on pulmonary arterial hypertension.  Our research interests relate to the impact of metabolic reprogramming on gene regulation and RNA translation, the impact of changes in shear stress and DNA damage on the epigenome, bioengineering blood vessels, immune and vascular cell interactions .  We incorporate transgenic models of disease, iPSC generated vascular and immune cells, gene editing, high-throughput drug testing, single cell RNA Sequencing and high dimensional single cell mapping of tissues.  Please consult our website for more details.

All our projects offer opportunities for co-mentoring in Basic, Engineering and Cardiovascular Science.

Sushma Reddy

Pediatrics, Ped: Cardiology, Cardiovascular Med Institute
Associate Professor of Pediatrics
View in Stanford Profiles


Last Updated: September 05, 2023

My laboratory's overall goal is to (i) understand the mechanisms of right heart failure in children and adults with congenital heart disease and (ii) to develop biomarkers as a plasma signature of myocardial events to better understand the mechanisms of heart failure, improve monitoring of disease progression, early detection of heart failure and risk-stratification.

We have focused on tetralogy of Fallot population and single ventricle heart disease. As the survival continues to improve, so also has the incidence of heart failure. However, the underlying cellular mechanisms of heart failure are poorly understood as a result of which no targeted therapy is available. Since it is not possible to obtain heart muscle biopsies routinely on patients, we have taken a novel strategy of using Multi-Omics to better understand disease mechanisms and to follow patients over time comparing their Omics signature to themselves thereby personalizing their care. The goal is to create a targeted biomarker panel for clinical utility to be used in conjunction with imaging data to improve overall prediction of risk. Based on our work to date, we are also interested in understanding myocardial mitochondrial and vascular dysfunction as these have the potential to serve as novel therapeutic targets.

Lab website is in creation. Link will be updated when it is ready.

 

  • Training in Myocardial Biology at Stanford (TIMBS)

Sushma Reddy

Pediatrics
Associate Professor of Pediatrics
View in Stanford Profiles


Last Updated: January 27, 2023

Current Research and Scholarly Interests
My laboratory's overall goal is to (i) understand the mechanisms of right heart failure in children and adults with congenital heart disease and (ii) to develop biomarkers as a plasma signature of myocardial events to better understand the mechanisms of heart failure, improve monitoring of disease progression, early detection of heart failure and risk-stratification.

We have focused on tetralogy of Fallot population and single ventricle heart disease. As the survival continues to improve, so also has the incidence of heart failure. However, the underlying cellular mechanisms of heart failure are poorly understood as a result of which no targeted therapy is available. Since it is not possible to obtain heart muscle biopsies routinely on patients, we have taken a novel strategy of using Multi-Omics to better understand disease mechanisms and to follow patients over time comparing their Omics signature to themselves thereby personalizing their care. The goal is to create a targeted biomarker panel for clinical utility to be used in conjunction with imaging data to improve overall prediction of risk. Based on our work to date, we are also interested in understanding myocardial mitochondrial and vascular dysfunction as these have the potential to serve as novel therapeutic targets.

Kathleen Sakamoto

Pediatrics
Professor of Pediatrics
View in Stanford Profiles


Last Updated: January 12, 2022

The Sakamoto lab studies normal and aberrant blood cell development. Her research team is interested in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic leukemia, including acute myeloid leukemia and chronic myeloid leukemia. The overall goal of her research is to understand the signaling pathways that lead to leukemia or bone marrow failure. She is also interested in developing new drugs to treat these diseases. Her group experience works with mammalian cells and mouse models of cancer and bone marrow failure syndromes, such as Diamond Blackfan Anemia. There are opportunities to work with physicians, translational researchers, medicinal chemists, and advisors from drug companies with experience in drug development.

Experiments utilize leukemia cell lines, primary mouse and human hematopoietic cells, and mouse models will be used.   Technologies in the lab include standard biochemical techniques (Western blot analysis, real-time PCR, immunoprecipitations), FACs/sorting, colony assays, lentiviral and retroviral transductions, transplantation experiments, xenograft models and bioluminescence, CyTOF, RNA-seq ,ChIP-seq, small molecule and  shRNA/CRISPR library screening. Knowledge in bioinformatics would be helpful for single cell RNA-seq experiments. The intent of these early translational studies is to develop small molecules or peptides into drugs to treat acute leukemia.  Assays to assess toxicity, metabolism, optimization, and mechanism of action of compounds are performed.

Dr. Sakamoto is committed to diversity and has trained many underrepresented high school, undergraduate, medical, graduate students and postdoctoral/MD fellows. She has served on the American Society of Hematology Minority Medical Student Program and was Chair of the Diversity Special Interest Group. She is currently working with SMASH Rising to recruit underrepresented high school graduates and community college students to Stanford to study clinical, translational, and basic hematology. 

 

  • Training in Pediatric Nonmalignant Hematology and Stem Cell Biology

Kathleen Sakamoto

Pediatrics
Professor
View in Stanford Profiles


Last Updated: July 13, 2022

My research focuses on studying normal and aberrant blood cell development. We are interested in understanding the pathogenesis of acute leukemia and bone marrow failure syndromes. We also work with medicinal chemists and computational biologists to develop novel therapies to treat these diseases.

Jason Yeatman

Pediatrics, Graduate School of Education
Assistant Professor
View in Stanford Profiles


Last Updated: August 10, 2020

Mission: Our mission is to both use neuroscience as a tool for improving education, and use education as a tool for furthering our understanding of the brain. On the one hand, advances in non-invasive, quantitative brain imaging technologies are opening a new window into the mechanisms that underlie learning. For children with learning disabilities such as dyslexia, we hope to develop personalized intervention programs that are tailored to a child’s unique pattern of brain maturation. On the other hand, interventions provide a powerful tool for understanding how environmental factors shape brain development. Combining neuroimaging with educational interventions we hope to further our understanding of plasticity in the human brain.
The Lab: The Brain Development & Education Lab is located in the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University and represents a collaboration between the Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics within the School of Medicine, the Graduate School of Education and the Wu Tsai Neuroscience Institute (we recently moved from The University of Washington’s Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences). The focus of the lab is understanding the interplay between brain maturation and cognitive development.  The lab is interdisciplinary, drawing on the fields of neuroscience, psychology, education, pediatrics and engineering to answer basic scientific and applied questions.  Current projects focus on understanding how the brain’s reading circuitry develops in response to education and how targeted behavioral interventions prompt changes in the brain’s of children with dyslexia. A major component of this work is the development of software to measure properties of human brain tissue, localize differences and quantify changes over development.

Tom Abel

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
View in Stanford Profiles


Last Updated: October 18, 2021

Tom's current research focuses on studying the formation and evolution of galaxies with new numerical techniques, however, he enjoys all areas of non-linear physics which can be addressed using supercomputer calculations! His research interests span dark matter dynamics, the physics of collisionless shocks, investigating the role that cosmic rays and magnetic fields play in the formation and evolution of galaxies, modeling the formation of stars and black holes as well as turbulence, and applications of numerical general relativity.

Daniel Akerib

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
View in Stanford Profiles


Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Together with Tom Shutt, Dan works on the LUX and LZ dark matter experiments to search for dark matter in the form of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, or WIMPs. The detectors use liquid xenon as a target medium in a time projection chamber, or TPC. The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment is currently operating a 250-kg target in the former Homestake gold mine in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Preparations are underway at SLAC to design and build the 7-ton successor, known as LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ). The group is involved in many aspects of data analysis, detector design, xenon purification, control andreadout systems, and detector performance studies.

Steven Allen

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
View in Stanford Profiles


Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Steve is interested in the physics of the most massive objects in the Universe and how we can use them to probe how the Universe evolved. Steve and his group are currently focused on understanding the astrophysics of galaxies and of galaxy clusters using multi-wavelength observations, and on using large, statistical samples of these objects to probe the natures of dark matter, dark energy and fundamental physics. More information regarding ongoing research and a list of Steve's current group members can be found here.

Roger Blandford

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
View in Stanford Profiles


Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Roger has broad interests in particle astrophysics and cosmology. Roger and his group are currently working on studies of gravitational lensing, compact objects (black holes, neutron stars and white dwarfs) and cosmic rays, tackling difficult questions such as the unknown nature of the gamma-ray flares of the Crab Nebula. He is interested in topics which range from pure theory through phenomenological studies to analysis of observational data. Some of his groups research is strongly computational but plenty is not.

Patricia Burchat

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
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Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Pat and her research group are currently working hard as part of the exciting Large Synoptic Survey Telescope Dark Energy Science Collaboration in the general area of gravitational lensing. Her group is using analytic calculations, simulations and existing astronomical images to thoroughly understand potential systematic biases and challenges in extracting accurate and precise measurements of cosmic shear from gravitational lensing with current and future surveys. Current projects include the study of chromatic effects and blended objects.

Susan Clark

Physics, Kavli Institute
Assistant Professor
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Last Updated: August 15, 2023

Susan is broadly interested in astrophysical magnetism and the physics of the interstellar medium (ISM), from diffuse gas to dense, star-forming regions. Susan’s research tackles open questions like the structure of the Milky Way’s magnetic field, the nature of interstellar turbulence and the multi-phase ISM, and the role of magnetism in star formation. These big questions demand multiwavelength observations and new data analysis techniques. Susan and her group decipher the magnetic ISM using a combination of theory and observation. Data-wise, the group uses a wide range of tracers including gas line emission and absorption, polarized dust and synchrotron emission, starlight polarization, Zeeman splitting, and Faraday rotation. Susan is involved in a number of current and future telescope projects, and leads several efforts focused on Galactic science with sensitive measurements of millimeter-wavelength emission made by cosmic microwave background experiments like the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) and the Simons Observatory (SO).

Susan Clark

Physics, Kavli Institute
Assistant Professor
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Last Updated: October 18, 2021

Susan is broadly interested in astrophysical magnetism and the physics of the interstellar medium (ISM), from diffuse gas to dense, star-forming regions. Susan’s research tackles open questions like the structure of the Milky Way’s magnetic field, the nature of interstellar turbulence, and the role of magnetism in star formation. These big questions demand multiwavelength observations and new data analysis techniques. Susan is particularly interested in deciphering the magnetic ISM using sensitive measurements of synchrotron and polarized dust emission made by cosmic microwave background experiments like the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) and the Simons Observatory (SO).

Peter Graham

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
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Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Peter is broadly interested in theoretical physics beyond the Standard Model, including cosmology, astrophysics, general relativity, and even atomic physics. The Standard Model leaves many questions unanswered including the nature of dark matter and the origins of the fundamental fermion masses, the weak scale, and the cosmological constant. These and other clues such as the unification of the forces are a guide to building new theories beyond the Standard Model. Peter's group are interested in inventing novel experiments to uncover this new physics.

Chao-Lin Kuo

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
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Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Chao-Lin’s group use the most ancient light, the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, emitted when the universe was in its infancy to shed light on the question of how the universe began. Currently Chao-Lin's group are involved in a number of experiments such as BICEP/BICEP2/Keck Array and have been working hard on detecting primordial B-mode polarization. His group are involved in both he design and construction of instruments as well as the data analysis and theoretical interpretation.

Craig Levin

Radiology, Physics, Electrical Engineering, Bioengineering, Radiology-MIPS, Stanford Cancer Center, Cardiovascular Med Institute, Neuroscience Institute
Professor
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Last Updated: March 16, 2022

The research interests of the molecular imaging instrumentation lab are to create novel instrumentation and software algorithms for in vivo imaging of molecular signatures of disease in humans and small laboratory animals. These new cameras efficiently image radiation emissions in the form of positrons, annihilation photons, gamma rays, and/or light emitted from molecular contrast agents that were introduced into the body and distributed in the subject tissues. These contrast agents are designed to target molecular pathways of disease biology and enable imaging of these biological signatures in tissues residing deep within the body using measurements made from outside the body.

The goals of the instrumentation projects are to advance the sensitivity and spatial, spectral, and/or temporal resolutions, and to create new camera geometries for special biomedical applications. The computational modeling and algorithm goals are to understand the physical system comprising the subject tissues, radiation transport, and imaging system, and to provide the best available image quality and quantitative accuracy.

The work involves designing and building instrumentation, including arrays of position sensitive sensors, readout electronics, and data acquisition electronics, signal processing research, including creation of computer models, and image reconstruction, image processing, and data/image analysis algorithms, and incorporating these innovations into practical imaging devices.

The ultimate goal is to introduce these new imaging tools into studies of molecular mechanisms and treatments of disease within living subjects.

  • Cancer-Translational Nanotechnology Training Program (Cancer-TNT)
  • Multi-Disciplinary Training Program in Cardiovascular Imaging at Stanford
  • Stanford Cancer Imaging Training (SCIT) Program
  • Stanford Molecular Imaging Scholars (SMIS)

Bruce Macintosh

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
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Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Our group works with  adaptive optics - optical systems that correct for aberrations using mirrors that change their shape thousands of times per second. This can allow telescopes located on the Earth to correct for atmospheric turbulence and produce diffraction-limited images, which we use to study giant extrasolar planets through direct imaging with the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) instrument. Direct imaging of extrasolar planets separates the light of the (faint) planet and (bright) star, allowing us to measure the spectrum of young self-luminous giant exoplanets. We are currently planning an upgrade to GPI, adding a faster adaptive optics system using predictive control, and more accurate wavefront sensors. 
 
We are studying this technology for more powerful instruments on the ground and space. We are also exploring applications in biology - microscopes that can look into tissues.

Roger Romani

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
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Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Roger is interested in a variety of topics in high energy astrophysics and cosmology. Much of Roger's group are currently focused on understanding the cosmic gamma-ray sources discovered by the Fermi Space telescope, principally pulsars and blazars. This inherently multi-wavelength question requires them to use telescopes all over the world and in space in order to assemble data on these objects and then to develop and test theoretical models to explain what we see.

Aaron Roodman

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
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Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Aaron's current research focus is the study of dark energy using images from the ongoing Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the  future Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). He is interested in studying dark energy using both galaxy clusters and weak gravitational lensing. His research group connects instrumental work, in particular active optics and wavefront measurements at DES and a program of camera-wide testing at LSST,  with cosmology measurements. For example, they are developing a new method to characterize the telescope+camera point spread function using optical data, to be part of the weak lensing data analysis at both DES and LSST.

Philip Scherrer

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
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Last Updated: July 14, 2022

Phil's main research interests are in the structure and dynamics of the interior of the sun, how this affect solar activity and through this its effects on terrestrial systems. Phil's group’s primary emphasis is on the structure and dynamics of the solar interior using techniques of helioseismology. His group are interested in both developing instrumentation for solar observatories and in the data analysis of solar magnetic fields from space and from the ground.

Thomas Shutt

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
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Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Together with Dan Akerib, Tom works on the LUX and LZ dark matter experiments to search for dark matter in the form of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, or WIMPs. The detectors use liquid xenon as a target medium in a time projection chamber, or TPC. The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment is currently operating a 250-kg target in the former Homestake gold mine in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Preparations are underway atSLAC to design and build the 7-ton successor, known as LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ). The group is involved in many aspects of data analysis, detector design, xenon purification, control andreadout systems, and detector performance studies.

Risa Wechsler

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
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Last Updated: July 13, 2022

How did the Universe form and evolve and what is it made of? Our group works on a range of topics in cosmology and astrophysics, with a focus on the formation of cosmological structure in the Universe, its impact on galaxy formation, and its use in determining the nature of dark matter and dark energy. We build and analyze numerical simulations and develop models of large scale structure and galaxy formation for comparison with large observational datasets, and develop new techniques to learn about the dark side of the Universe from these data.  We are actively involved in the ongoing Dark Energy Survey (DES), the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and also work on finding, measuring, and modeling dwarf galaxies with the SAGA survey.

Neir Eshel

Psyc: Behavioral Medicine, Neuroscience Institute
Assistant Professor
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Last Updated: August 15, 2023

The STAAR Lab is a dynamic new neuroscience lab in Stanford’s Psychiatry Department, led by Neir Eshel, MD, PhD. We are looking to hire curious and ambitious postdocs to join our team. Lab projects focus on the neural circuitry of aggressive and compulsive behaviors, using optogenetics, in vivo imaging, electrophysiology, and sophisticated machine learning/artificial intelligence analyses of animal behavior. There are ample opportunities for career development and clinical exposure based on candidate interest. Compensation and benefits are highly competitive. The ideal postdoctoral candidate has an MD and/or PhD in neuroscience or related field and extensive experience with rodent neuroscience. Excellent analytical skills, e.g., Python & Matlab, are strongly preferred. An expert data analyst may be considered even without animal experience. We are strongly committed to diversity and inclusion.

Hadi Hosseini

Psyc: Behavioral Medicine
Assistant Professor
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Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Our lab’s research portfolio crosses multiple disciplines including computational neuropsychiatry, multimodal neuroimaging, cognitive neuroscience and neurocognitive rehabilitation. Our computational neuropsychiatry research mainly involves investigating alterations in the organization of connectome in various neurodevelopmental and neurocognitive disorders using state of the art neuroimaging techniques (fMRI, sMRI, DWI, functional NIRS) combined with novel computational methods (graph theoretical and multivariate pattern analyses). The ultimate research goal is to translate the findings from computational neuropsychiatry research toward developing personalized interventions. We have been developing personalized interventions that integrate computerized cognitive rehabilitation, real-time functional brain imaging and neurofeedback, as well as virtual reality (VR) tailored toward targeted rehabilitation of the affected brain networks in patients with neurocognitive disorders.

Ongoing studies in Dr. Hosseini’s lab include: .

  • Multimodal data integration using multilayer networks for early detection of Alzheimer's disease   
  • Real-time fNIRS neuromonitoring and neurofeedback for targeted enhancement of working memory in children with ADHD.
  • Multimodal neuroimaging study to examine the effect of long-term, cognitive intervention on brain networks in older adults at risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Developing a low-cost, wireless, wearable, optical imaging system for personal and population-based functional neuroimaging and neuro-intervention.
  • Noninvasive optical imaging for monitoring of functional stroke recovery and to direct and optimize stroke therapies.

Oxana Palesh

Psyc: Behavioral Medicine
Associate Professor
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Last Updated: July 14, 2022

Dr. Palesh's research is in the area of cancer control. She is primarily interested in investigating the impact of cancer treatments on sleep, neurocognitive impairment, cancer-related fatigue and quality of life. Her current projects include investigating the impact of behavioral interventions (e.g., behavioral, physical activity, CAM) on improving sleep, circadian function, autonomic nervous system functioning, neurocognitive functioning, fatigue and quality of life in cancer patients and survivors. She is also investigating the relationship between dysregulation of the neuroendocrine stress response system, circadian disruption, sleep problems, fatigue, and disease progression in cancer patients with primary and metastatic cancers. Dr. Palesh's current NIH-funded studies include Phase III RCT of Brief Behavioral Intervention on Sleep, Circadian and ANS function and etiology and long-term outcome of cancer related neurocognitive impairment in newly diagnosed patients with breast cancer. Other projects are focused on understanding cancer survivorship needs and experiences of women diagnozed with cancer.

Allan Reiss

Psyc: Behavioral Medicine
Professor
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Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Dr. Reiss is the Howard C. Robbins Professor and Vice Chair of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Professor of Radiology and Pediatrics, and a recognized expert in the fields of neuropsychiatry, genetics, neuroimaging, neurodevelopment, and cognitive neuroscience. His research utilizes an interdisciplinary, multi-level scientific approach to elucidate the neurobiological pathways that lead to both typical and atypical behavioral and cognitive outcomes in children and adolescents. He is director of the NIMH funded Research Training for Child Psychiatry and Neurodevelopment program which is currently recruiting for two - three year fellowships. The program is seeking applicants from the fields of psychiatry, psychology, pediatrics, neurology, genetics, neuroscience, developmental biology, computer science and related fields who seek to improve or expand their ability to conduct interdisciplinary- translational research. Physician-scientists accepted into the program can potentially combine the research training program with their clinical training over a 3 to 4 year period.

Nirao Shah

Psyc: Behavioral Medicine, Neurobiology
Professor
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Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Nirao Shah's lab is interested in understanding the molecular and neural networks that regulate sexually dimorphic social behaviors.

Manpreet Singh

Psyc: Behavioral Medicine
Associate Professor
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Last Updated: July 14, 2022

If mood symptoms are identified early in life, the opportunity exists to prevent them from progressing to more disabling chronic conditions. Dr. Singh has developed a scientifically-informed comprehensive framework to accurately diagnose and treat childhood-onset depression and other mood disorders before or soon after they present. The Pediatric Emotion And Resilience Lab uses a multimodal neurobiological approach combining neuroimaging, affective neuroscience, and rigorous clinical assessment to understand the mechanisms of risk and resilience in children. We are looking for postdoctoral candidates from the fields of psychiatry, psychology, pediatrics, neurology, genetics, neuroscience, developmental biology, computer science and related fields who seek to improve or expand their ability to conduct interdisciplinary and translational research in pediatric mood disorders.

  • A Biobehavioral Research Training Program
  • Research Training for Child Psychiatry and Neurodevelopment

Ranak Trivedi

Psyc: Behavioral Medicine
Assistant Professor
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Last Updated: July 13, 2022

I am most passionate about improving the role of family and friends in the long-term self-management of patients with advanced chronic illnesses. We are spearheading the first ever Center of Excellence to support family caregivers of Veterans and are seeking fellows as collaborators.  I also co-direct the postdoctoral and post-residency fellowships in Health Services Research and Medical Informatics at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System.

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