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PRISM Mentors

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PRISM supports all faculty in recruiting postdocs. The faculty listed on this page have expressed special interest in the PRISM program and may be actively recruiting. This is one of many ways to identify potential postdoc mentors; also review the guidance and links in the PRISM Application Guide for other ways to explore Stanford faculty. As you look for potential postdoc mentors, consider how faculty research interests align with your own.

Faculty: to create a profile, click "Log In" at the top right corner, then the "PRISM Faculty Opt In" button below. To edit an existing profile, click "Log In" at the top right corner, then the "Edit" button under your name/department/URL.

 

PRISM Faculty Opt-In   Displaying 1 - 50 of 567
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

Aaron Gitler

Genetics
Professor
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Genetics


Last Updated: January 27, 2023

We study mechanisms of human neurodegenerative diseases, including ALS, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease. We use a combination of functional genomics (e.g., CRISPR screens), human genetics to discover new disease genes, and validation in patient samples and animal models. We also seek to discover therapeutic targets and to translate these findings into developing novel therapeutics to help treat these devastating diseases. 

  • Institutional Training Grant in Genome Science
  • Stanford Training Program in Aging Research

Aaron Newman

Biomedical Data Sciences, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med
Assistant Professor
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Biomedical Data Sciences, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med


Last Updated: June 02, 2022

Our group combines computational and experimental techniques to study the cellular organization of complex tissues, with a focus on determining the phenotypic diversity and clinical significance of tumor cell subsets. We have a particular interest in developing innovative data science tools that illuminate the cellular hierarchies and stromal elements that underlie tumor initiation, progression, and response to therapy. As part of this focus, we develop new algorithms to resolve cellular states and multicellular communities, tumor developmental hierarchies, and single-cell spatial relationships from genomic profiles of clinical biospecimens. Key results are further explored experimentally, both in our lab and through collaboration, with the goal of translating promising findings into the clinic.

As a member of the Department of Biomedical Data Science and the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, and as an affiliate of graduate programs in Biomedical Informatics, Cancer Biology, and Immunology, we are also interested in the development of impactful biomedical data science tools in areas beyond our immediate research focus, including developmental biology, regenerative medicine, and systems immunology.

Aaron Newman

Biomedical Data Sciences, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med
Assistant Professor
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Biomedical Data Sciences, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med


Last Updated: June 02, 2022

Our group combines computational and experimental techniques to study the cellular organization of complex tissues, with a focus on determining the phenotypic diversity and clinical significance of tumor cell subsets. We have a particular interest in developing innovative data science tools that illuminate the cellular hierarchies and stromal elements that underlie tumor initiation, progression, and response to therapy. As part of this focus, we develop new algorithms to resolve cellular states and multicellular communities, tumor developmental hierarchies, and single-cell spatial relationships from genomic profiles of clinical biospecimens. Key results are further explored experimentally, both in our lab and through collaboration, with the goal of translating promising findings into the clinic.

As a member of the Department of Biomedical Data Science and the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, and as an affiliate of graduate programs in Biomedical Informatics, Cancer Biology, and Immunology, we are also interested in the development of impactful biomedical data science tools in areas beyond our immediate research focus, including developmental biology, regenerative medicine, and systems immunology.

Aaron Roodman

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
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Physics, Kavli Institute


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Aaron's current research focus is the study of dark energy using images from the ongoing Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the  future Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). He is interested in studying dark energy using both galaxy clusters and weak gravitational lensing. His research group connects instrumental work, in particular active optics and wavefront measurements at DES and a program of camera-wide testing at LSST,  with cosmology measurements. For example, they are developing a new method to characterize the telescope+camera point spread function using optical data, to be part of the weak lensing data analysis at both DES and LSST.

Aaron Roodman

Physics, Kavli Institute
Professor
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Physics, Kavli Institute


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Aaron's current research focus is the study of dark energy using images from the ongoing Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the  future Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). He is interested in studying dark energy using both galaxy clusters and weak gravitational lensing. His research group connects instrumental work, in particular active optics and wavefront measurements at DES and a program of camera-wide testing at LSST,  with cosmology measurements. For example, they are developing a new method to characterize the telescope+camera point spread function using optical data, to be part of the weak lensing data analysis at both DES and LSST.

Aaron Straight

Biochemistry
Associate Professor
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Biochemistry


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Our laboratory studies the dynamics and organization of eukaryotic genomes. Every eukaryotic cell must compact its DNA into the nucleus while maintaining the accessibility of the DNA to the replication, repair, expression and segregation machinery. Eukaryotes accomplish this feat by assembling their genomes into chromatin and folding that chromatin into functional compartments. We are studying four key processes in the eukaryotic nucleus: 1) the genetic and epigenetic basis for centromere formation that enables chromosome segregation, 2) the role of noncoding RNAs in structuring the genome and regulating gene expression, 3) the formation of silent heterochromatin and its role in genome organization and 4) the activation of the embryonic genome at the maternal to zygotic transition. We rely on biochemistry, quantitative microscopy and genomics to probe genome dynamics in vitro and in living systems. Our goal is to uncover the core principles that organize eukaryotic genomes and to understand how genome organization controls organismal function.

Ada Poon

Electrical Engineering
Associate Professor
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Electrical Engineering


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

I am interested in how we could use electronics to treat diseases. I am particularly interested in diseases where currently, there is no drug to cure it (Alzheimer's disease), drug has side effects (obesity), and drug is too expensive (diabetes). For the obesity project, I have a hypothesis on the plasticity of white adipose tissue. I am looking for postdoc students to validate the hypothesis and then build the device making use of the hypothesis to treat obesity.

Adam Wang

Radiology, Electrical Engineering
Professor
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Radiology, Electrical Engineering


Last Updated: July 14, 2022

My research interests revolve around the following areas: - Novel systems and methods for x-ray and CT imaging - Applications of x-ray/CT to image-guided interventions and therapy and diagnostic imaging - Dual energy / spectral imaging, including photon counting detectors - Applications of artificial intelligence / machine learning / deep learning to medical imaging - Monte Carlo and Deterministic methods for x-ray imaging and radiation dose - Model-based image reconstruction

  • Stanford Cancer Imaging Training (SCIT) Program

Adam Wang

Radiology, Electrical Engineering
Professor
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Radiology, Electrical Engineering


Last Updated: July 14, 2022

My research interests revolve around the following areas: - Novel systems and methods for x-ray and CT imaging - Applications of x-ray/CT to image-guided interventions and therapy and diagnostic imaging - Dual energy / spectral imaging, including photon counting detectors - Applications of artificial intelligence / machine learning / deep learning to medical imaging - Monte Carlo and Deterministic methods for x-ray imaging and radiation dose - Model-based image reconstruction

  • Stanford Cancer Imaging Training (SCIT) Program

Agnieszka Czechowicz

Pediatrics, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med
Assistant Professor
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Pediatrics, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med


Last Updated: February 01, 2022

The lab's current research is aimed primarily at understanding how hematopoietic stem cells interact with their microenvironment in order to subsequently modulate these interactions to ultimately improve bone marrow transplantation and unlock biological secrets that further enable regenerative medicine broadly. We are primarily focused on studying the cell surface receptors on hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and bone marrow stromal cells, and are actively learning how manipulating these can alter cell state and cell fate.  We have also pioneered several antibody-based conditioning methods that are at various stages of clinical development to enable safer stem cell transplantation.

There are many exciting opportunities that stem from this work across a variety of disease states ranging from rare genetic diseases, autoimmune diseases, solid organ transplantation, microbiome and cancer. While we are primarily focused on blood and immune diseases, the expanded potential of this work is much broader and can be applied to other organ systems as well and we are very eager to develop collaborations across disease areas. The Czechowicz lab hopes to further add in the field of translation research.

Goals
We aim to increase our understanding of the basic science principles that govern these cells and then exploit these findings to develop improved therapies for patients
We are particularly focused on pediatric non-malignant bone marrow transplantation with a strong interest in genetic blood/immune diseases and bone marrow failure, but do complementry work on solid tumors with marrow disease, solid organ tolerance induction, autoimmune diseases and gene therapy/gene editing.

  • Program in Translational and Experimental Hematology

Agnieszka Czechowicz

Pediatrics, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med
Assistant Professor
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Pediatrics, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med


Last Updated: February 01, 2022

The lab's current research is aimed primarily at understanding how hematopoietic stem cells interact with their microenvironment in order to subsequently modulate these interactions to ultimately improve bone marrow transplantation and unlock biological secrets that further enable regenerative medicine broadly. We are primarily focused on studying the cell surface receptors on hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and bone marrow stromal cells, and are actively learning how manipulating these can alter cell state and cell fate.  We have also pioneered several antibody-based conditioning methods that are at various stages of clinical development to enable safer stem cell transplantation.

There are many exciting opportunities that stem from this work across a variety of disease states ranging from rare genetic diseases, autoimmune diseases, solid organ transplantation, microbiome and cancer. While we are primarily focused on blood and immune diseases, the expanded potential of this work is much broader and can be applied to other organ systems as well and we are very eager to develop collaborations across disease areas. The Czechowicz lab hopes to further add in the field of translation research.

Goals
We aim to increase our understanding of the basic science principles that govern these cells and then exploit these findings to develop improved therapies for patients
We are particularly focused on pediatric non-malignant bone marrow transplantation with a strong interest in genetic blood/immune diseases and bone marrow failure, but do complementry work on solid tumors with marrow disease, solid organ tolerance induction, autoimmune diseases and gene therapy/gene editing.

  • Program in Translational and Experimental Hematology

Alan Cheng

Surg: Otolaryngology
Professor
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Surg: Otolaryngology


Last Updated: November 22, 2021

I am a surgeon-scientist with a clinical interest in caring for patients with hearing loss and deafness, and research interests in inner ear development and regeneration. For almost 20 years, I have been studying hair cell biology. Since 2007, my research has focused on defining the role of Wnt signaling in regulating hair cell progenitors in the developing and damaged inner ear using a combination of genetic, molecular biological, pharmacological, and imaging techniques. In particular, our work has led to the discovery of Wnt-responsive hair cell progenitors in the neonatal mouse cochlea and utricle, and more recently, functional recovery during vestibular regeneration.

Department URL:
https://med.stanford.edu/ohns.html

  • Clinician-scientist training program in otolaryngology

Albert Wu

Ophthalmology, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med
Assistant Professor
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Ophthalmology, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med


Last Updated: January 13, 2022

Our translational research laboratory endeavors to bring breakthroughs in stem cell biology and tissue engineering to clinical ophthalmology and reconstructive surgery. Over 6 million people worldwide are afflicted with corneal blindness, usually caused by chemical and thermal burns, ocular cicatricial pemphigoid, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, microbial infections, or chronic inflammation. These injuries often result in corneal vascularization, conjunctivalization, scarring, and opacification from limbal epithelial stem cell (LSC) deficiency (LSCD), for which there is currently no durable treatment.

The most promising cure for bilateral LSCD is finding an autologous source of limbal epithelial cells for transplantation. Utilizing recent advances in the field of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), our research aims to create a reliable and renewable source of limbal epithelial cells for potential use in treating human eye diseases. These cells will be grown on resorbable biomatrices to generate stable transplantable corneal tissue. These studies will serve as the basis for human clinical trials and make regenerative medicine a reality for those with sight-threatening disease. On a broader level, this experimental approach could serve as a paradigm for the creation of other transplantable tissue for use throughout the body. Stem cell biology has the potential to influence every field of medicine and will revolutionize the way we perform surgery.

Albert Wu

Ophthalmology, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med
Assistant Professor
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Ophthalmology, Stem Cell Bio Regenerative Med


Last Updated: January 13, 2022

Our translational research laboratory endeavors to bring breakthroughs in stem cell biology and tissue engineering to clinical ophthalmology and reconstructive surgery. Over 6 million people worldwide are afflicted with corneal blindness, usually caused by chemical and thermal burns, ocular cicatricial pemphigoid, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, microbial infections, or chronic inflammation. These injuries often result in corneal vascularization, conjunctivalization, scarring, and opacification from limbal epithelial stem cell (LSC) deficiency (LSCD), for which there is currently no durable treatment.

The most promising cure for bilateral LSCD is finding an autologous source of limbal epithelial cells for transplantation. Utilizing recent advances in the field of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), our research aims to create a reliable and renewable source of limbal epithelial cells for potential use in treating human eye diseases. These cells will be grown on resorbable biomatrices to generate stable transplantable corneal tissue. These studies will serve as the basis for human clinical trials and make regenerative medicine a reality for those with sight-threatening disease. On a broader level, this experimental approach could serve as a paradigm for the creation of other transplantable tissue for use throughout the body. Stem cell biology has the potential to influence every field of medicine and will revolutionize the way we perform surgery.

Alex Dunn

Chemical Engineering
Associate Professor
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Chemical Engineering


Last Updated: October 05, 2022

Our group is an eclectic mixture of physicists, biologists and engineers who are all passionately interested in the problem of how living cells self-assemble into structures of often dazzling complexity. Unlike human-engineered systems, for example a car or computer chip, every aspect of cell and tissue function must arise from bottom-up self-assembly. The physical mechanisms that govern this self-assembly process are largely unknown, making this one of the most interesting problems in biological research today. Understanding how biological self-assembly occurs is also of critical practical importance. At present, tissue engineering is largely driven by empirical, trial-and-error approaches. A deeper understanding of the processes that underlie cell and tissue organization will, over the longer term, help drive the transformation of tissue engineering into a discipline with understood and predictable design principles, as is the case, for example, in mechanical or electrical engineering. To tackle this general problem we use techniques drawn from molecular biophysics, cell and developmental biology, and increasingly, computer science. Please check out our web page for details on specific problems, and email Alex for more details. 

  • Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Training Program

Alexandra Konings

Earth Energy Env Sciences
Assistant Professor

Earth Energy Env Sciences


Last Updated: August 10, 2020

Our group in Stanford's Department of Earth System Science, led by Prof. Alexandra Konings, studies how ecosystems and the carbon cycle respond to variations in water availability at large scales, and how ecosystems will change under future climate. Our research questions principally focus on plant hydraulics, water-carbon coupling in the tropics, and the role of spatial variability in plant traits. In order to answers these questions, we primarily use remote sensing data analysis and model development. In particular, we often use new microwave measurements of vegetation water content. We believe that a deep understanding of remote sensing techniques helps us do better science and therefore also work on developing new remote sensing datasets and their validation.

Alfredo Dubra

Ophthalmology
Associate Professor
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Ophthalmology


Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Our lab is part of the Byers Eye Institute and the Ophthalmology Department at Stanford University. We seek to develop novel retinal imaging technologies to improve the diagnosing and treatment of ocular, vascular, neurodegenerative and systemic diseases. Our work is motivated by the personal interactions with research study volunteers and patients that we have been fortunate to have worked with. We pursue this through a multidisciplinary approach that integrates optics, computer science, vision science, electrical engineering and other engineering disciplines, in a highly collaborative environment with clinical colleagues in our department.

Alice Ting

Genetics
Professor
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Genetics


Last Updated: July 14, 2022

The goal of our laboratory is to develop molecular technologies for mapping cells and functional circuits. At the sub-cellular scale, maps document the spatial organization of proteins, RNA, DNA, and metabolites with nanometer precision and temporal acuity on the order of seconds. Maps also chart the connectivity between these molecules, elucidating the circuits and signaling processes that give rise to function. Beyond the single cell, we also strive to map cellular ensembles, such as brain tissue. Can we create tools that contribute to the construction of cell and tissue atlases, and can we map the cellular circuits that give rise to function and behavior? To achieve these goals, our laboratory employs a wide variety of approaches, including directed evolution, protein engineering, organic synthesis, computational design, mass spec proteomics, and single-cell RNA seq. Our work lies at the interface between chemical biology, genetics, biophysics, cell biology, and neuroscience.

  • Institutional Training Grant in Genome Science
  • Molecular and Cellular Immunobiology
  • Stanford Cancer Imaging Training (SCIT) Program

Alice Ting

Biology, Genetics, Chemistry
Professor
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Biology, Genetics, Chemistry


Last Updated: January 12, 2022

We are a chemical biology laboratory focused on the development of technologies to map molecules, cells, and functional circuits. We apply the technologies to understand signaling in the mitochondria and in the mammalian brain.

Our technologies probe molecules and functional networks at both the sub-cellular and multi-cellular level, leveraging our laboratory’s unique strengths in chemical synthesis, protein engineering, directed evolution, proteomics, and microscopy. While we strive to develop technologies that are broadly applicable across biology, we also pursue applications of our methods to neuroscience and mitochondrial biology in our own laboratory and through collaborations.

Our research program is broadly divided into three areas: (1) molecular recorders for scalable, single-cell recording of past cellular events; (2) molecular editors for the precise manipulation of cellular biomolecules, pathways, and organelles; and (3) proximity labeling for unbiased discovery of functional molecules.

 

Alice Ting

Biology, Genetics, Chemistry
Professor
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Biology, Genetics, Chemistry


Last Updated: January 12, 2022

We are a chemical biology laboratory focused on the development of technologies to map molecules, cells, and functional circuits. We apply the technologies to understand signaling in the mitochondria and in the mammalian brain.

Our technologies probe molecules and functional networks at both the sub-cellular and multi-cellular level, leveraging our laboratory’s unique strengths in chemical synthesis, protein engineering, directed evolution, proteomics, and microscopy. While we strive to develop technologies that are broadly applicable across biology, we also pursue applications of our methods to neuroscience and mitochondrial biology in our own laboratory and through collaborations.

Our research program is broadly divided into three areas: (1) molecular recorders for scalable, single-cell recording of past cellular events; (2) molecular editors for the precise manipulation of cellular biomolecules, pathways, and organelles; and (3) proximity labeling for unbiased discovery of functional molecules.

 

Alice Ting

Biology, Genetics, Chemistry
Professor
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Biology, Genetics, Chemistry


Last Updated: January 12, 2022

We are a chemical biology laboratory focused on the development of technologies to map molecules, cells, and functional circuits. We apply the technologies to understand signaling in the mitochondria and in the mammalian brain.

Our technologies probe molecules and functional networks at both the sub-cellular and multi-cellular level, leveraging our laboratory’s unique strengths in chemical synthesis, protein engineering, directed evolution, proteomics, and microscopy. While we strive to develop technologies that are broadly applicable across biology, we also pursue applications of our methods to neuroscience and mitochondrial biology in our own laboratory and through collaborations.

Our research program is broadly divided into three areas: (1) molecular recorders for scalable, single-cell recording of past cellular events; (2) molecular editors for the precise manipulation of cellular biomolecules, pathways, and organelles; and (3) proximity labeling for unbiased discovery of functional molecules.

 

Alison Marsden

Pediatrics, Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, Cardiovascular Med Institute
Associate Professor
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Pediatrics, Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, Cardiovascular Med Institute


Last Updated: August 09, 2020

The Cardiovascular Biomechanics Computation Lab  develops fundamental computational methods for the study of cardiovascular disease progression, surgical methods, treatment planning and medical devices.  We focus on patient-specific modeling in pediatric and congenital heart disease, as well as adult cardiovascular disease.  Our lab bridges engineering and medicine through the departments of Pediatrics, Bioengineering, and the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering. We develop the SimVascular open source project.

  • Mechanisms in Innovation in Vascular Disease
  • Multi-Disciplinary Training Program in Cardiovascular Imaging at Stanford

Alison Marsden

Pediatrics, Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, Cardiovascular Med Institute
Associate Professor
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Pediatrics, Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, Cardiovascular Med Institute


Last Updated: August 09, 2020

The Cardiovascular Biomechanics Computation Lab  develops fundamental computational methods for the study of cardiovascular disease progression, surgical methods, treatment planning and medical devices.  We focus on patient-specific modeling in pediatric and congenital heart disease, as well as adult cardiovascular disease.  Our lab bridges engineering and medicine through the departments of Pediatrics, Bioengineering, and the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering. We develop the SimVascular open source project.

  • Mechanisms in Innovation in Vascular Disease
  • Multi-Disciplinary Training Program in Cardiovascular Imaging at Stanford

Alison Marsden

Pediatrics, Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, Cardiovascular Med Institute
Associate Professor
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Pediatrics, Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, Cardiovascular Med Institute


Last Updated: August 09, 2020

The Cardiovascular Biomechanics Computation Lab  develops fundamental computational methods for the study of cardiovascular disease progression, surgical methods, treatment planning and medical devices.  We focus on patient-specific modeling in pediatric and congenital heart disease, as well as adult cardiovascular disease.  Our lab bridges engineering and medicine through the departments of Pediatrics, Bioengineering, and the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering. We develop the SimVascular open source project.

  • Mechanisms in Innovation in Vascular Disease
  • Multi-Disciplinary Training Program in Cardiovascular Imaging at Stanford

Alison Marsden

Pediatrics, Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, Cardiovascular Med Institute
Associate Professor
View in Stanford Profiles

Pediatrics, Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, Cardiovascular Med Institute


Last Updated: August 09, 2020

The Cardiovascular Biomechanics Computation Lab  develops fundamental computational methods for the study of cardiovascular disease progression, surgical methods, treatment planning and medical devices.  We focus on patient-specific modeling in pediatric and congenital heart disease, as well as adult cardiovascular disease.  Our lab bridges engineering and medicine through the departments of Pediatrics, Bioengineering, and the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering. We develop the SimVascular open source project.

  • Mechanisms in Innovation in Vascular Disease
  • Multi-Disciplinary Training Program in Cardiovascular Imaging at Stanford

Alison Marsden

Pediatrics, Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, Cardiovascular Med Institute
Associate Professor
View in Stanford Profiles

Pediatrics, Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, Cardiovascular Med Institute


Last Updated: August 09, 2020

The Cardiovascular Biomechanics Computation Lab  develops fundamental computational methods for the study of cardiovascular disease progression, surgical methods, treatment planning and medical devices.  We focus on patient-specific modeling in pediatric and congenital heart disease, as well as adult cardiovascular disease.  Our lab bridges engineering and medicine through the departments of Pediatrics, Bioengineering, and the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering. We develop the SimVascular open source project.

  • Mechanisms in Innovation in Vascular Disease
  • Multi-Disciplinary Training Program in Cardiovascular Imaging at Stanford

Alistair Boettiger

Developmental Biology
Assistant Professor
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Developmental Biology


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Our lab focuses on the role of three-dimensional genome organization in regulating gene expression and shaping cell fate specification during development. We pursue this with advanced single-molecule imaging and transgenic techniques in Drosophila and mammalian cell culture.

Allan L Reiss

Psyc: Child Psychiatry, Radiology, Pediatrics, Neuroscience Institute
Professor
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Psyc: Child Psychiatry, Radiology, Pediatrics, Neuroscience Institute


Last Updated: February 07, 2024

My research group is currently focused on understanding brain function and inter-brain synchrony during naturalistic social interaction. We use ultra-portable near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to address specific scientific questions with an emphasis on multi-modal assessment (e.g., behavioral, physiological, environmental setting, and eye-tracking in addition to functional NIRS). This overall scientific apprach is called "interaction neuroscience:.

  • Research Training for Child Psychiatry and Neurodevelopment

Allan L Reiss

Psyc: Child Psychiatry, Radiology, Pediatrics, Neuroscience Institute
Professor
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Psyc: Child Psychiatry, Radiology, Pediatrics, Neuroscience Institute


Last Updated: February 07, 2024

My research group is currently focused on understanding brain function and inter-brain synchrony during naturalistic social interaction. We use ultra-portable near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to address specific scientific questions with an emphasis on multi-modal assessment (e.g., behavioral, physiological, environmental setting, and eye-tracking in addition to functional NIRS). This overall scientific apprach is called "interaction neuroscience:.

  • Research Training for Child Psychiatry and Neurodevelopment

Allan L Reiss

Psyc: Child Psychiatry, Radiology, Pediatrics, Neuroscience Institute
Professor
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Psyc: Child Psychiatry, Radiology, Pediatrics, Neuroscience Institute


Last Updated: February 07, 2024

My research group is currently focused on understanding brain function and inter-brain synchrony during naturalistic social interaction. We use ultra-portable near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to address specific scientific questions with an emphasis on multi-modal assessment (e.g., behavioral, physiological, environmental setting, and eye-tracking in addition to functional NIRS). This overall scientific apprach is called "interaction neuroscience:.

  • Research Training for Child Psychiatry and Neurodevelopment

Allan L Reiss

Psyc: Child Psychiatry, Radiology, Pediatrics, Neuroscience Institute
Professor
View in Stanford Profiles

Psyc: Child Psychiatry, Radiology, Pediatrics, Neuroscience Institute


Last Updated: February 07, 2024

My research group is currently focused on understanding brain function and inter-brain synchrony during naturalistic social interaction. We use ultra-portable near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to address specific scientific questions with an emphasis on multi-modal assessment (e.g., behavioral, physiological, environmental setting, and eye-tracking in addition to functional NIRS). This overall scientific apprach is called "interaction neuroscience:.

  • Research Training for Child Psychiatry and Neurodevelopment

Allan Reiss

Psyc: Behavioral Medicine
Professor
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Psyc: Behavioral Medicine


Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Dr. Reiss is the Howard C. Robbins Professor and Vice Chair of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Professor of Radiology and Pediatrics, and a recognized expert in the fields of neuropsychiatry, genetics, neuroimaging, neurodevelopment, and cognitive neuroscience. His research utilizes an interdisciplinary, multi-level scientific approach to elucidate the neurobiological pathways that lead to both typical and atypical behavioral and cognitive outcomes in children and adolescents. He is director of the NIMH funded Research Training for Child Psychiatry and Neurodevelopment program which is currently recruiting for two - three year fellowships. The program is seeking applicants from the fields of psychiatry, psychology, pediatrics, neurology, genetics, neuroscience, developmental biology, computer science and related fields who seek to improve or expand their ability to conduct interdisciplinary- translational research. Physician-scientists accepted into the program can potentially combine the research training program with their clinical training over a 3 to 4 year period.

Andrea Goldstein-Piekarski

Psyc: Sleep Disorders
Assistant Professor
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Psyc: Sleep Disorders


Last Updated: August 15, 2023

My lab, The CoPsyN Sleep lab, utilizes human neuroimaging, high density EEG, computational methods, and clinical psychology to examine the role of sleep physiology in the development, maintenance, and treatment of psychopathology across the lifespan. A primary goal of this research is to identify novel sleep and neuroimaging related biomarkers of treatment response that could be used to better match patients to effective treatments.

Andres Cardenas

Epidemiology and Population Health
Assistant Professor
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Epidemiology and Population Health


Last Updated: August 15, 2023

Our group investigates prenatal and early-life determinants of health and disease. We conduct epidemiological analyses of human cohorts to investigate chemical (e.g. metals, endocrine disruptors, air pollution, climate change) and non-chemical stressors (e.g. adversity, discrimination) and their relationships to human health and development. We use computational and bioinformatics approaches to study epigenetic and DNA methylation biomarkers in humans. Our group also has a special interest in human aging and epigenetic biomarkers of aging.

Trainees in our group develop skills in computational biology, environmental mixtures modeling, modeling of multi -omic data and machine learning.

Andrew Fire

Pathology, Genetics
Professor
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Pathology, Genetics


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Our lab studies the mechanisms by which cells and organisms respond to genetic change. The genetic landscape faced by a living cell is constantly changing. Developmental transitions, environmental shifts, and pathogenic invasions lend a dynamic character to both the genome and its activity pattern.We study a variety of natural mechanisms that are utilized by cells adapting to genetic change. These include mechanisms activated during normal development and systems for detecting and responding to foreign or unwanted genetic activity. At the root of these studies are questions of how a cell can distinguish "self" versus "nonself" and "wanted" versus "unwanted" gene expression. We primarily make use of the nematode C. elegans in our experimental studies. C. elegans is small, easily cultured, and can readily be made to accept foreign DNA or RNA. The results of such experiments have outlined a number of concerted responses that recognize (and in most cases work to silence) the foreign nucleic acid. One such mechanism ("RNAi") responds to double stranded character in RNA: either as introduced experimentally into the organism or as produced from foreign DNA that has not undergone selection to avoid a dsRNA response. Much of the current effort in the lab is directed toward a molecular understanding of the RNAi machinery and its roles in the cell. RNAi is not the only cellular defense against unwanted nucleic acid, and substantial current effort in the lab is also directed at identification of other triggers and mechanisms used in recognition and response to foreign information.

  • Institutional Training Grant in Genome Science
  • Molecular and Cellular Immunobiology
  • Training in Pediatric Nonmalignant Hematology and Stem Cell Biology

Andrew Fire

Pathology, Genetics
Professor
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Pathology, Genetics


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Our lab studies the mechanisms by which cells and organisms respond to genetic change. The genetic landscape faced by a living cell is constantly changing. Developmental transitions, environmental shifts, and pathogenic invasions lend a dynamic character to both the genome and its activity pattern.We study a variety of natural mechanisms that are utilized by cells adapting to genetic change. These include mechanisms activated during normal development and systems for detecting and responding to foreign or unwanted genetic activity. At the root of these studies are questions of how a cell can distinguish "self" versus "nonself" and "wanted" versus "unwanted" gene expression. We primarily make use of the nematode C. elegans in our experimental studies. C. elegans is small, easily cultured, and can readily be made to accept foreign DNA or RNA. The results of such experiments have outlined a number of concerted responses that recognize (and in most cases work to silence) the foreign nucleic acid. One such mechanism ("RNAi") responds to double stranded character in RNA: either as introduced experimentally into the organism or as produced from foreign DNA that has not undergone selection to avoid a dsRNA response. Much of the current effort in the lab is directed toward a molecular understanding of the RNAi machinery and its roles in the cell. RNAi is not the only cellular defense against unwanted nucleic acid, and substantial current effort in the lab is also directed at identification of other triggers and mechanisms used in recognition and response to foreign information.

  • Institutional Training Grant in Genome Science
  • Molecular and Cellular Immunobiology
  • Training in Pediatric Nonmalignant Hematology and Stem Cell Biology

Andrew Gentles

Biomedical Data Sciences, Biomedical Informatics, Stanford Cancer Center, Neuroscience Institute
Assistant professor
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Biomedical Data Sciences, Biomedical Informatics, Stanford Cancer Center, Neuroscience Institute


Last Updated: January 12, 2022

Our research focus is in computational systems biology, primarily in cancer and more recently in neurodegenerative diseases.  We develop and apply methods to understand biological processes underlying disease, using high-throughput genomic and proteomic datasets and integrating them with phenotypes and clinical outcomes. A key interest is dissecting how the cellular composition and organization of tissues affects their behaviour in disease; and how these things might be targeted for therapy or diagnostic purposes. We collaborate with many wet lab and clinical groups at Stanford, including in the areas of cancer, immunology, and neuroscience.

Andrew Gentles

Biomedical Data Sciences, Biomedical Informatics, Stanford Cancer Center, Neuroscience Institute
Assistant professor
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Biomedical Data Sciences, Biomedical Informatics, Stanford Cancer Center, Neuroscience Institute


Last Updated: January 12, 2022

Our research focus is in computational systems biology, primarily in cancer and more recently in neurodegenerative diseases.  We develop and apply methods to understand biological processes underlying disease, using high-throughput genomic and proteomic datasets and integrating them with phenotypes and clinical outcomes. A key interest is dissecting how the cellular composition and organization of tissues affects their behaviour in disease; and how these things might be targeted for therapy or diagnostic purposes. We collaborate with many wet lab and clinical groups at Stanford, including in the areas of cancer, immunology, and neuroscience.

Andrew Gentles

Biomedical Data Sciences, Biomedical Informatics, Stanford Cancer Center, Neuroscience Institute
Assistant professor
View in Stanford Profiles

Biomedical Data Sciences, Biomedical Informatics, Stanford Cancer Center, Neuroscience Institute


Last Updated: January 12, 2022

Our research focus is in computational systems biology, primarily in cancer and more recently in neurodegenerative diseases.  We develop and apply methods to understand biological processes underlying disease, using high-throughput genomic and proteomic datasets and integrating them with phenotypes and clinical outcomes. A key interest is dissecting how the cellular composition and organization of tissues affects their behaviour in disease; and how these things might be targeted for therapy or diagnostic purposes. We collaborate with many wet lab and clinical groups at Stanford, including in the areas of cancer, immunology, and neuroscience.

Andrew Gentles

Biomedical Data Sciences, Biomedical Informatics, Stanford Cancer Center, Neuroscience Institute
Assistant professor
View in Stanford Profiles

Biomedical Data Sciences, Biomedical Informatics, Stanford Cancer Center, Neuroscience Institute


Last Updated: January 12, 2022

Our research focus is in computational systems biology, primarily in cancer and more recently in neurodegenerative diseases.  We develop and apply methods to understand biological processes underlying disease, using high-throughput genomic and proteomic datasets and integrating them with phenotypes and clinical outcomes. A key interest is dissecting how the cellular composition and organization of tissues affects their behaviour in disease; and how these things might be targeted for therapy or diagnostic purposes. We collaborate with many wet lab and clinical groups at Stanford, including in the areas of cancer, immunology, and neuroscience.

Andrew Huberman

Neurobiology
Associate Professor
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Neurobiology


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Our specific main goals are to:

1. Discover strategies for halting and reversing vision loss in blinding diseases.

2. Understand how visual perceptions and arousal states are integrated to impact behavioral responses.

We use a large range of state-of-the-art tools: virtual reality, gene therapy, anatomy, electrophysiology and imaging and behavioral analyses.

Andrew Mannix

Materials Sci & Engineering, Geballe Lab for Adv Mat
Assistant Professor
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Materials Sci & Engineering, Geballe Lab for Adv Mat


Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Building synthetic solids with atomic precision from layered sheets and other nanomaterials. Scanning probe characterization of atomic-scale electronic and opto-electronic phenomena. 2D materials and thin film growth.

Andrew Mannix

Materials Sci & Engineering, Geballe Lab for Adv Mat
Assistant Professor
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Materials Sci & Engineering, Geballe Lab for Adv Mat


Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Building synthetic solids with atomic precision from layered sheets and other nanomaterials. Scanning probe characterization of atomic-scale electronic and opto-electronic phenomena. 2D materials and thin film growth.

Anna Gloyn

Pediatrics, Genetics
Professor
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Pediatrics, Genetics


Last Updated: January 29, 2022

We aim to understand the genetic basis of diabetes and related metabolic conditions and to use this to leverage a better understanding of what causes diabetes and how we can improve treatment options for patients. Our work is predominantly focused on understanding what causes pancreatic islets to release insufficient insulin to control blood glucose levels after a meal in patients with type 2 diabetes, but often extends to efforts to relate this to metabolic dysfunction in other relevant tissues such as fat and liver.

We are an inter-disciplinary team of basic and clinical scientists with shared interests in using molecular genetics as a tool to uncover novel biology. We use a variety of different approaches to address important challenges in the field, which range from studies that work genome wide to those which are focused on specific genes and even precise nucleotide changes to understand their impact on pancreatic islet biology.

We have developed a series of pipelines that use primary human islets and authentic beta-cell models which allow us to generate and then integrate complex genomic, transcriptomic and cellular datasets. We use state-of-the art genome engineering approaches combined with induced pluripotent stem-cells to study the impact of T2D-associated genetic variants on islet cell development and function. We are also funded to investigate the impact of T2D risk variants on pancreatic beta-cell function in vivo.

We are a highly collaborative team and work with multiple national and international consortia involved in efforts to understand the genetic basis of type 2 diabetes (eg DIAGRAM, NIDDK Funded Accelerated Medicines Partnership) and related glycaemic traits (MAGIC). We are also part of several Innovative Medicines Initiatives (IMIs) efforts including STEMBANCC and RHAPSODY and Horizon 2020 initiatives (eg T2DSYSTEMS), which are working to develop tools and frameworks to capitalize on genetic and genomic data.

We are also part of the NIDDK funded Human Islet Research Network (HIRN) where we play a role in two of their initiatives. The Human Pancreas Atlas Program- T2 (HPAP-T2D) and the Integrated Islet Phenotype Program (IIPP). Our role is to support the genetic and genomic characterization of islets which are distributed for research and to support the genomic characterization of the pancreas’ phenotyped within the HPAP-T2D program.

Our work extends to playing a role in the interpretation of genetic variants identified in genes with known roles in monogenic forms of diabetes. We are part of the Clin Gen Expert Review Panel for Monogenic Diabetes where are expertise contributes to interpretation of coding alleles in glucokinase (GCK) and Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1 alpha (HNF1A). We are a number of on-going projects which are supporting efforts to better understand how to use exome-sequencing data in a diagnostic setting.

  • Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism
  • Institutional Training Grant in Genome Science

Anna Gloyn

Pediatrics, Genetics
Professor
View in Stanford Profiles

Pediatrics, Genetics


Last Updated: January 29, 2022

We aim to understand the genetic basis of diabetes and related metabolic conditions and to use this to leverage a better understanding of what causes diabetes and how we can improve treatment options for patients. Our work is predominantly focused on understanding what causes pancreatic islets to release insufficient insulin to control blood glucose levels after a meal in patients with type 2 diabetes, but often extends to efforts to relate this to metabolic dysfunction in other relevant tissues such as fat and liver.

We are an inter-disciplinary team of basic and clinical scientists with shared interests in using molecular genetics as a tool to uncover novel biology. We use a variety of different approaches to address important challenges in the field, which range from studies that work genome wide to those which are focused on specific genes and even precise nucleotide changes to understand their impact on pancreatic islet biology.

We have developed a series of pipelines that use primary human islets and authentic beta-cell models which allow us to generate and then integrate complex genomic, transcriptomic and cellular datasets. We use state-of-the art genome engineering approaches combined with induced pluripotent stem-cells to study the impact of T2D-associated genetic variants on islet cell development and function. We are also funded to investigate the impact of T2D risk variants on pancreatic beta-cell function in vivo.

We are a highly collaborative team and work with multiple national and international consortia involved in efforts to understand the genetic basis of type 2 diabetes (eg DIAGRAM, NIDDK Funded Accelerated Medicines Partnership) and related glycaemic traits (MAGIC). We are also part of several Innovative Medicines Initiatives (IMIs) efforts including STEMBANCC and RHAPSODY and Horizon 2020 initiatives (eg T2DSYSTEMS), which are working to develop tools and frameworks to capitalize on genetic and genomic data.

We are also part of the NIDDK funded Human Islet Research Network (HIRN) where we play a role in two of their initiatives. The Human Pancreas Atlas Program- T2 (HPAP-T2D) and the Integrated Islet Phenotype Program (IIPP). Our role is to support the genetic and genomic characterization of islets which are distributed for research and to support the genomic characterization of the pancreas’ phenotyped within the HPAP-T2D program.

Our work extends to playing a role in the interpretation of genetic variants identified in genes with known roles in monogenic forms of diabetes. We are part of the Clin Gen Expert Review Panel for Monogenic Diabetes where are expertise contributes to interpretation of coding alleles in glucokinase (GCK) and Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1 alpha (HNF1A). We are a number of on-going projects which are supporting efforts to better understand how to use exome-sequencing data in a diagnostic setting.

  • Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism
  • Institutional Training Grant in Genome Science

Anne Charity Hudley

Graduate School of Education, Linguistics
Bonnie Katz Tenenbaum Professor of Education, Associate Dean of Educational Affairs, Stanford Graduate School of Education
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Graduate School of Education, Linguistics


Last Updated: August 16, 2023

 

The Black Academic Development Lab’s (BAD Lab) mission is to integrate linguistic research with educational praxis and create a model of scholarship for dissemination. Our goal is to create innovative, community-centered scholarly products. As such, the BAD Lab will establish long-term collaborative research partnerships with Black faculty, particularly at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). These collaborations will allow us to research the learning experiences of Black educators and students in education and other disciplines.

You can read about our active NSF grants here: https://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=2126405 

 https://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1757654

 

 

Anne Charity Hudley

Graduate School of Education, Linguistics
Bonnie Katz Tenenbaum Professor of Education, Associate Dean of Educational Affairs, Stanford Graduate School of Education
View in Stanford Profiles

Graduate School of Education, Linguistics


Last Updated: August 16, 2023

 

The Black Academic Development Lab’s (BAD Lab) mission is to integrate linguistic research with educational praxis and create a model of scholarship for dissemination. Our goal is to create innovative, community-centered scholarly products. As such, the BAD Lab will establish long-term collaborative research partnerships with Black faculty, particularly at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). These collaborations will allow us to research the learning experiences of Black educators and students in education and other disciplines.

You can read about our active NSF grants here: https://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=2126405 

 https://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1757654

 

 

Anne Charity-Hudley

Graduate School of Education, Linguistics
Bonnie Katz Tenenbaum Professor of Education, Associate Dean of Educational Affairs
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Graduate School of Education, Linguistics


Last Updated: January 27, 2023

The Stanford BAD Lab is dedicated to centering the lives of Black academics and to the study of liberatory linguistics. We are invested in research that provides insight on factors that affect the academic and professional retention and the quality of life of Black people throughout the teaching and learning lifespan. Our current research projects focus on increasing racial diversity in the STEM fields, including the linguistic sciences; supporting teachers in building their knowledge of linguistic variation and its role in student outcomes across subject areas; and survivorship care of Black cancer patients.

Anne Charity-Hudley

Graduate School of Education, Linguistics
Bonnie Katz Tenenbaum Professor of Education, Associate Dean of Educational Affairs
View in Stanford Profiles

Graduate School of Education, Linguistics


Last Updated: January 27, 2023

The Stanford BAD Lab is dedicated to centering the lives of Black academics and to the study of liberatory linguistics. We are invested in research that provides insight on factors that affect the academic and professional retention and the quality of life of Black people throughout the teaching and learning lifespan. Our current research projects focus on increasing racial diversity in the STEM fields, including the linguistic sciences; supporting teachers in building their knowledge of linguistic variation and its role in student outcomes across subject areas; and survivorship care of Black cancer patients.

Anne Villeneuve

Developmental Biology, Genetics
Professor
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Developmental Biology, Genetics


Last Updated: August 15, 2023

Anne Villeneuve’s laboratory investigates the molecular and cellular events underlying the faithful inheritance of chromosomes during meiosis, the specialized cell division program by which diploid organisms generate haploid gametes. These events are crucial for reproduction, since failure to execute them correctly leads to aneuploidy, one of the leading causes of miscarriages and birth defects in humans. One major goal is to understand the mechanisms and regulation of genetic recombination, which is responsible both for reassortment of genetic traits and for promoting segregation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis. An inter-related goal is to understand how meiosis-specific chromosome organization is established, maintained, and remodeled to bring about successful genome inheritance. Dr. Villeneuve approaches these issues using the nematode C. elegans, a simple organism that is especially amenable to combining sophisticated microscopic, genetic and genomic approaches in a single experimental system. Dr. Villeneuve’s research interrogates the process of meiosis at multiple different scales: 1) at the level of the DNA repair complexes that assemble at the sites of meiotic recombination; 2) at the level of the meiosis-specific chromosome structures that promote, regulate and respond to meiotic recombination events and 3) at the level of DNA organization at the whole-chromosome scale.

  • Institutional Training Grant in Genome Science

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