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PRISM Mentors

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PRISM supports all faculty in recruiting postdocs. The faculty listed on this page have expressed special interest in the PRISM program and may be actively recruiting. This is one of many ways to identify potential postdoc mentors; also review the guidance and links in the PRISM Application Guide for other ways to explore Stanford faculty. As you look for potential postdoc mentors, consider how faculty research interests align with your own.

Faculty: to create a profile, click "Log In" at the top right corner, then the "PRISM Faculty Opt In" button below. To edit an existing profile, click "Log In" at the top right corner, then the "Edit" button under your name/department/URL.

 

PRISM Faculty Opt-In   Displaying 151 - 200 of 567
PRISM mentor Research Interests

Laura Schaefer

Geological Sciences
Assistant Professor, Earth and Planetary Sciences
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Geological Sciences


Last Updated: August 30, 2023

In the Planetary Modeling Group, we use a variety of modeling techniques to study planets near and far. We focus on the interaction between the interiors and atmospheres of rocky planets both in the Solar System and around other stars. We study the birth and differentiation of planets, the exotic lava worlds of the exoplanet population, but also questions about the environment of the early Earth and other potentially habitable planets and how those planets evolve due to geology, stellar influences, and life.

William Ellsworth

Geophysics
Professor (Research)
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Geophysics


Last Updated: August 06, 2020

My research interests can be broadly defined as the study of active faults, the earthquakes they generate and the physics of the earthquake source. A major objective of my work is to improve our knowledge of earthquake hazards through the application of physics-based understanding of the underlying processes. I have also long been committed to earthquake risk reduction, specifically through the transfer of scientific understanding of the hazard to people, businesses, policymakers and government agencies.  I co-direct the Stanford Center for Induced and Triggered Seismicity where we pursue a broad range of fundamental and applied research into the underlying causes of human-induced earthquakes and solutions to mitigate their risk.

  • A Biobehavioral Research Training Program
  • Adult and Pediatric Nephrology and Urology Research Training Program

Simon Klemperer

Geophysics, Geological Sciences
Professor
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Geophysics, Geological Sciences


Last Updated: September 09, 2020

Dustin Schroeder

Geophysics
Assistant Professor
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Geophysics


Last Updated: October 21, 2021

Jade Benjamin-Chung

Epidemiology and Population Health
Assistant Professor
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Epidemiology and Population Health


Last Updated: November 22, 2021

Our research aims to improve population health by creating high quality evidence about what health interventions work in whom and where, when, and how to implement them. Most of our research is focused on infectious diseases, including malaria, diarrhea, soil-transmitted helminths, and influenza. Our focus is on improving the health of vulnerable populations from low-resource settings, both domestically and internationally. We use a variety of epidemiologic, computational, and statistical methods, including causal inference and machine learning methods.

Jade Benjamin-Chung

Epidemiology and Population Health
Assistant Professor
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Epidemiology and Population Health


Last Updated: November 22, 2021

Our research aims to improve population health by creating high quality evidence about what health interventions work in whom and where, when, and how to implement them. Most of our research is focused on infectious diseases, including malaria, diarrhea, soil-transmitted helminths, and influenza. Our focus is on improving the health of vulnerable populations from low-resource settings, both domestically and internationally. We use a variety of epidemiologic, computational, and statistical methods, including causal inference and machine learning methods.

Department URL:
https://med.stanford.edu/epidemiology-dept.html

Andres Cardenas

Epidemiology and Population Health
Assistant Professor
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Epidemiology and Population Health


Last Updated: August 15, 2023

Our group investigates prenatal and early-life determinants of health and disease. We conduct epidemiological analyses of human cohorts to investigate chemical (e.g. metals, endocrine disruptors, air pollution, climate change) and non-chemical stressors (e.g. adversity, discrimination) and their relationships to human health and development. We use computational and bioinformatics approaches to study epigenetic and DNA methylation biomarkers in humans. Our group also has a special interest in human aging and epigenetic biomarkers of aging.

Trainees in our group develop skills in computational biology, environmental mixtures modeling, modeling of multi -omic data and machine learning.

SUZAN CARMICHAEL

Pediatrics, Maternal Fetal Medicine and Obstetrics, Epidemiology and Population Health
PROFESSOR
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Pediatrics, Maternal Fetal Medicine and Obstetrics, Epidemiology and Population Health


Last Updated: January 29, 2023

Our team is committed to finding ways to improve maternal and infant health outcomes and equity by leading research that identifies effective leverage points for change, from upstream 'macro' social and structural factors, to downstream 'micro' clinical factors through a collaborative research approach that integrates epidemiologic approaches with community engagement and systems thinking.

Disparities are prominent in maternal and infant health, so a lot of our work is centered on equity.  Focusing on highest-risk groups will improve health for everyone.

Much of our current research focuses on severe maternal morbidity (SMM). SMM encompasses adverse conditions that put pregnant people at risk of short and long-term consequences related to labor and delivery, including death.

We also study other important perinatal outcomes, including stillbirth, preterm birth, structural congenital malformations and other maternal morbidities.  We are interested in these outcomes individually, as well as in how they are connected to each other -- from a mechanistic standpoint (ie, do they share the same causes), and a lifecourse perspective (eg, how does an adverse newborn outcome affect the mom's postpartum health, and vice versa).

Dr. Carmichael's training is in perinatal and nutritional epidemiology.  She deeply appreciates her multi-disciplinary colleagues who make this work more meaningful by bringing their own varied perspectives and lived experiences, and their expertise in clinical care, qualitative and mixed methods, community engagement, and state-of-the-art epidemiologic approaches and biostatistical methods.

Pascal Geldsetzer

Med: Primary Care and Population Health, Epidemiology and Population Health
Assistant Professor
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Med: Primary Care and Population Health, Epidemiology and Population Health


Last Updated: December 01, 2021

We are a highly interdisciplinary group with a diverse set of research interests that span various areas of medicine and public health. These interests include i) the use of novel causal inference techniques in electronic health record data to assess the real-life effectiveness of clinical (e.g., medications), behavioral, and health services interventions; ii) deep learning in satellite imagery and other publicly available geotagged data sources to monitor health indicators in low- and middle-income countries; iii) the re-analysis of clinical trial data to gain novel insights; and iv) randomized trials and analysis of household surveys in low- and middle-income countries to improve population health (with a focus on chronic conditions, particularly cardiovascular disease risk factors).

Lisa Goldman Rosas

Epidemiology and Population Health
Assistant Professor
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Epidemiology and Population Health


Last Updated: September 06, 2023

The goal of the Food for Health Equity Lab is to generate evidence of the effectiveness of 'Food as Medicine' programs that can be implemented in diverse healthcare settings to address food insecurity in a way that improves patient outcomes. This work particularly focuses on improving nutrition and reducing chronic diseases within under-resourced communities and communities of color. The lab includes diverse studies including two large-scale randomized controlled trials, a large scale evaluation of a produce prescription program, and multiple pilot studies in different clinical and demographic populations. We use a community-based participatory research orientation and have a Community Advisory Board for our project. The ultimate goal of our research is to inform health policy that will support programs that address food insecurity and reduce inequities in chronic disease. 

Eleni Linos

Dermatology, Epidemiology and Population Health
Professor
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Dermatology, Epidemiology and Population Health


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Our team’s research spans the fields of dermatology, technology and public health. One of our main projects is centered on developing innovative skin cancer prevention interventions using social media. Another project area is the use of shared decision-making, mobile app technology for monitoring and optimal care of low risk skin cancers. We collaborate closely with colleagues in bioinformatics and computer science on use of visual Artificial intelligence methods to skin image monitoring. Additionally, we advocate for diversity and gender equity in medicine by writing both original data articles and perspective pieces on these topics. We collaborate with epidemiologists, clinicians, biostatisticians, basic, computer and social scientists at Stanford University as well as other institutions.

  • Clinical Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases

Maya Mathur

Epidemiology and Population Health
Assistant Professor
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Epidemiology and Population Health


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Maya Mathur is an Assistant Professor at the Stanford University Quantitative Sciences Unit and the Associate Director of the Stanford Center for Open and Reproducible Science. She is a statistician whose methodological research focuses on advancing methods for meta-analysis, replication studies, and sensitivity analysis. She has received early-career and young investigator awards from the Society for Epidemiologic Research, the Society for Research Synthesis Methods, and American Statistical Association.

Michelle Odden

Epidemiology and Population Health
Associate Professor
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Epidemiology and Population Health


Last Updated: March 15, 2022

Michelle Odden, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health (E&PH) in the Stanford School of Medicine and a Research Scientist in the Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center (GRECC) in the VA Palo Alto Health Care System. Her research aims to improve our understanding of the optimal preventive strategies for chronic disease in older adults, particularly those who have been underrepresented in research including the very old, frail, and racial/ethnic minorities. Her work has focused on prevention of cardiovascular and kidney outcomes, as well as preservation of physical and cognitive function in older adults. Additionally, she has new projects in mitochondrial genetics and the proteomic signature of aging.  Dr. Odden’s methodologic focus in in causal inference and methods to reduce biases in observational studies. She also serves as the Chair of the E&PH Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Committee. 

Julie Parsonnet

Med: Infectious Diseases, Epidemiology and Population Health
Professor
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Med: Infectious Diseases, Epidemiology and Population Health


Last Updated: January 27, 2022

Dr. Parsonnet is an Infectious Diseases epidemiologist and clinician.  The Parsonnet lab works to understand how infectious agents influence the development of chronic diseases.  During the COVID crisis, the lab has also been actively involved in a wide range of investigations of this disease ranging from large seroepidemiologic studies to novel treatment trials to collaborative studies on COVID immunology.  Studies that could potentially take a fellow include:

  • Large seroepidemiologic, longitudinal studies of COVID in the counties throughout California both before and after the initiation of vaccines.   We have collected data sets that allow us to understand risk factors for breakthrough infections,  how vaccination and other interventions change behavior,  and the role of natural infection in building immunity.
  • Studies on COVID infection, immunity and vaccination in patients receiving dialysis
  • A clinical trial of camostat, a TMPPRS2 blocker, that prevents SARS-CoV2 from entering cells.
  • Studies that define the normal human body temperature in children and adults
  • Research on how skin care in babies varies across populations and how this influences skin integrity and development of allergic diseases later in life (with Kari Nadeau).
  • Studies on the development of the pediatric virome, microbiome and immunome in the first three years of life.
  • Clinical Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases

Julie Parsonnet

Med: Infectious Diseases, Epidemiology and Population Health
Professor
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Med: Infectious Diseases, Epidemiology and Population Health


Last Updated: January 27, 2023

I am an infectious diseases physician and epidemiologist    OUr lab is well know internationally in two major areas:  1.  The role of infections in chronic diseases and 2.  Physiologic changes in humans over time, specifically the decrease in human body temperature.  3. Novel surveillance projects, especially serosurveys done through the mail and  the use of wastewater to track infections.  Right now, projects that could integrate a post-doctoral fellow include:  In addition, my research group works on gun violence prevention.  

1.  Analysis of a California population-based serosurvey on SARS-COV2 infection, including information on human behaviors (mask wearing, social , vaccination) and demographics (age, race, education),  We could expand this study to look at other infectious diseases as well.

2.  Research assessing the association between high normal body temperature and longevity.

3.  Gun violence prevention.  Gun violence is a national tragedy.  We have two major projects in this area:

     a.  A project with Santa Clara County Department of Public health that combines the many data sources on gun violence across the county (Police, hospitals,EMT, schools, health departments), bring together stakeholders at community organizations across the county fighting gun violence and work with health care workers to identify strategies to educate patients on gun violence prevention.

     b.  Educational project development to teach physicians across the county how to talk to patients about gun violence

  • Applied Genomics in Infectious Diseases
  • Clinical Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases
  • Training grant in academic gastroenterology

Thomas Robinson

Ped: General Pediatrics, Med: Prevention Research Cntr, Epidemiology and Population Health, Cardiovascular Med Institute, Stanford Cancer Center, Woods Institute, HumanCentered Artificial Inte
Professor
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Ped: General Pediatrics, Med: Prevention Research Cntr, Epidemiology and Population Health, Cardiovascular Med Institute, Stanford Cancer Center, Woods Institute, HumanCentered Artificial Inte


Last Updated: January 27, 2023

Stanford Solutions Science Lab.

The Stanford Solutions Science Lab designs solutions to improve health and well-being of children, families, and the planet.  Dr. Robinson originated the solution-oriented research paradigm. He is known for his pioneering obesity prevention and treatment research, including the concept of stealth interventions. His research applies social cognitive models of behavior change to behavioral, social, environmental and policy interventions for children and families in real world settings, making the results relevant for informing clinical and public health practice and policy. His research is largely experimental, conducting rigorous school-, family- and community-based randomized controlled trials. He studies obesity and disordered eating, nutrition, physical activity/inactivity and sedentary behavior, the effects of television and other screen time, adolescent smoking, aggressive behavior, consumerism, and behaviors to promote environmental sustainability. Rich longitudinal datasets of physical, physiological, psychological, behavioral, social, behavioral, and multi-omics measures are available from our many community-based obesity prevention and treatment trials in low-income and racial/ethnic minority populations of children and adolescents and their parents.

Stanford Screenomics Lab - Human Screenome Project.

People increasingly live their lives through smartphones. Our Stanford Screenomics app captures everything that people see and do on their smartphone screens – a record of digital life – by taking a screenshot every 5 seconds. The resulting sequence of screenshots, make up an individual’s screenome, an unique and dynamic sequence of exposures, thoughts, feelings, and actions. To date, we have collected more than 350 million screenshots from 6-12 months of phone use from national samples of about 500 hundred adults and adolescents and their parents. Opportunities available to study the screenome to understand digital media use and its impacts on health and behavior,  develop novel diagnostics and prognostics from the screenome, and deliver precision interventions to improve health and well being. An opportunity to help build this paradigm-disrupting new science.

Patricia Rodriguez Espinosa

Epidemiology and Population Health
Assistant Professor, Associate Director of Research, Office of Community Engagement
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Epidemiology and Population Health


Last Updated: August 20, 2023

The ultimate goal of my research is to decrease health inequities among racial/ethnic minority populations, particularly Latinxs and immigrant communities, through transdisciplinary and community-engaged scholarship. Our research centers on health equity promotion and chronic disease prevention. This work employs principles of community engagement and Community Based Participatory Research and partners with multi-sectoral stakeholders to design and implement research that meets the needs of local communities. Dr. Rodriguez Espinosa has several ongoing studies and partnerships addressing issues related to cancer, chronic conditions, COVID-19, and models that can strenghten social services systems. Many of her studies partner with promotoras or Community Health Workers. She is the Associate Director of Research for the Stanford Medicine Office of Community Engagment and current chair of the Society of Behavioral Medicine Health Equity Special Insterest Group. 

Anne Charity Hudley

Graduate School of Education, Linguistics
Bonnie Katz Tenenbaum Professor of Education, Associate Dean of Educational Affairs, Stanford Graduate School of Education
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Graduate School of Education, Linguistics


Last Updated: August 16, 2023

 

The Black Academic Development Lab’s (BAD Lab) mission is to integrate linguistic research with educational praxis and create a model of scholarship for dissemination. Our goal is to create innovative, community-centered scholarly products. As such, the BAD Lab will establish long-term collaborative research partnerships with Black faculty, particularly at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). These collaborations will allow us to research the learning experiences of Black educators and students in education and other disciplines.

You can read about our active NSF grants here: https://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=2126405 

 https://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1757654

 

 

Anne Charity-Hudley

Graduate School of Education, Linguistics
Bonnie Katz Tenenbaum Professor of Education, Associate Dean of Educational Affairs
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Graduate School of Education, Linguistics


Last Updated: January 27, 2023

The Stanford BAD Lab is dedicated to centering the lives of Black academics and to the study of liberatory linguistics. We are invested in research that provides insight on factors that affect the academic and professional retention and the quality of life of Black people throughout the teaching and learning lifespan. Our current research projects focus on increasing racial diversity in the STEM fields, including the linguistic sciences; supporting teachers in building their knowledge of linguistic variation and its role in student outcomes across subject areas; and survivorship care of Black cancer patients.

Charles Eesley

Mgmt Sci & Engineering
Associate Professor
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Mgmt Sci & Engineering


Last Updated: July 14, 2022

Our group's research interests center around entrepreneurship. We are particularly interested in policy and the institutional environment, entrepreneurs in emerging economies and entrepreneurship among historically under-represented populations. We also do some work on technology platforms to facilitate startups and refugee entrepreneurship.

Chuck Eesley

Mgmt Sci & Engineering
Associate Professor
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Mgmt Sci & Engineering


Last Updated: August 11, 2020

My research focuses on the influence of the external environment on entrepreneurship. Specifically, I have sought to be a leader in investigating the types of environments that encourage the founding of high growth, technology-based firms. Although I build on previous work that focuses on individual characteristics, network ties, and strategy, my major contribution is to demonstrate that institutions matter. I have broken new ground in showing that effective institutional change influences who starts firms, not just how many firms are started. I have repeatedly studied entrepreneurship in a single country (China, Chile, Japan, and the U.S.) before and after a major institutional change. My work is divided into three streams: (1) formal institutions (policies and regulations), (2) university and industry environments, and (3) informal institutions (social movements).
STREAM 1: My research in this stream advances theory by introducing novel mechanisms (e.g. barriers to growth and failure, institutional inconsistency), introducing new concepts (e.g. skill adequacy and context relevance) and in theorizing that institutional changes that lower barriers to growth and to failure alter who becomes an entrepreneur, the type of firms, and performance.
STREAM 2: My work in this stream changes the way we think about team composition as well as what characteristics lead to venture performance by linking their impacts to industry environments.
STREAM 3: In this stream, I explored how social movement organizations can change firms.
My research changes the way we think about how the environment – formal institutions, informal institutions, and industry contexts – influences entrepreneurship. I am a leader in situating ventures within environments and showing that interactions between environments and entrepreneurs matter. I am among the first to argue and show that policies that foster high-growth entrepreneurship are different than those that spawn small businesses. If policy leaders wish to foster technology-based start-ups, then we must consider how institutions operate. My research shows that institutional changes can significantly influence the types of firms that are created, who creates them, and how they perform. My research challenges widely accepted ideas about entrepreneurship by highlighting taken-for-granted notions that are incomplete or misleading. My studies call into question the assumption that institutions that make it easier to start firms are unambiguously beneficial, and that experienced, diverse founding teams are always superior. My theoretical contributions include introducing such concepts as institutional barriers to growth, skill adequacy and context relevance. I lead the way in broadening our conception of entrepreneurship beyond the developed North American economies. I have contributed methodologically by (A) showing how to measure talent, (B) collecting data internationally, (C) using randomized field experiments, and (D) analyzing multi-industry databases with state-of-the-art statistics (instrumental variables, differences-in-differences). I have been a pioneer in overcoming the challenges of inferring causality, by finding changes that altered the landscape for entrepreneurship, along with collecting novel data in international settings. In future work, I plan to do more studies incorporating software development for data collection and digital platforms for randomized experiments focusing on issues related to strategic change and entrepreneurship training. 

  • Other

Eric Appel

Materials Sci & Engineering, Ped: Endocrinology
Assistant Professor
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Materials Sci & Engineering, Ped: Endocrinology


Last Updated: July 13, 2022

We are an interdisciplinary team focusing on generating new biomaterials to tackle healthcare challenges of critical importance to society. We are using these new biomaterials as sustained delivery technologies that can act as tools to better understand fundamental biological processes and to engineer next-generation healthcare solutions.

  • Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism

Sarah Heilshorn

Materials Sci & Engineering, Bioengineering, Chemical Engineering
Professor, Director, Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials (GLAM)
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Materials Sci & Engineering, Bioengineering, Chemical Engineering


Last Updated: December 01, 2021

Heilshorn's interests include biomaterials in regenerative medicine, engineered proteins with novel assembly properties, microfluidics and photolithography of proteins, and synthesis of materials to influence stem cell differentiation. Current projects include tissue engineering for spinal cord and blood vessel regeneration, designing injectable materials for use in stem cell therapies, and the design of biomaterials for culture of patient-derived biopsies and organoids. Postdoctoral candidates with expertise (or an interest in learning) preclinical animal models of injury and disease are particularly encouraged.

Department URL:
https://mse.stanford.edu

  • Mechanisms in Innovation in Vascular Disease

Andrew Mannix

Materials Sci & Engineering, Geballe Lab for Adv Mat
Assistant Professor
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Materials Sci & Engineering, Geballe Lab for Adv Mat


Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Building synthetic solids with atomic precision from layered sheets and other nanomaterials. Scanning probe characterization of atomic-scale electronic and opto-electronic phenomena. 2D materials and thin film growth.

Eric Pop

Electrical Engineering, Materials Sci & Engineering
Professor
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Electrical Engineering, Materials Sci & Engineering


Last Updated: January 27, 2023

The Pop Lab is a research group led by Prof. Eric Pop in Electrical Engineering (EE) and Materials Science & Engineering (MSE) at Stanford University. We are located in the Paul Allen Center for Integrated Systems (CIS), working in the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility (SNF) and the Stanford Nano Shared Facilities (SNSF). We are affiliated with the Stanford SystemX Alliance and the Non-Volatile Memory Technology Research Initiative (NMTRI).

Our research is at the intersection of nanoelectronics and nanoscale energy conversion, exploring topics such as:

  • Energy-efficient transistors, data storage (memory), and thermoelectrics
  • 2D materials (graphene, h-BN, MoS2, WSe2,...) and phase-change materials (GST, VO2)
  • Fundamental physical limits of current and heat flow, e.g. ballistic electrons and phonons
  • Applications of nanoscale energy transport, conversion and harvesting

Our work includes nanofabrication, characterization, and multiscale simulations. On-campus collaborations include Materials Science, Physics, Chemical and Mechanical Engineering, and off-campus they range from UIUC, UC Davis, Georgia Tech, UT Dallas, Univ. of Tokyo and Singapore (NUS), to TU Wien, Univ. Bologna and Poli Milano.

To learn more about us, please visit http://poplab.stanford.edu

Shan Wang

Materials Sci & Engineering, Electrical Engineering
Professor
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Materials Sci & Engineering, Electrical Engineering


Last Updated: July 14, 2022

Prof. Wang and his group are engaged in the research of magnetic nanotechnologies and information storage in general, including magnetic biochips, in vitro diagnostics, cell sorting, magnetic nanoparticles, nano-patterning, spin electronic materials and sensors, magnetic inductive heads, as well as magnetic integrated inductors and transformers. He uses modern thin-film growth techniques, lithography, and nanofabrication to engineer new electromagnetic materials and devices and to study their behavior at nanoscale and at very high frequencies. His group is investigating magnetic nanoparticles, high saturation soft magnetic materials, giant magnetoresistance spin valves, magnetic tunnel junctions, and spin electronic materials, with applications in cancer nanotechnology, in vitro diagnostics, spin-based information processing, efficient energy conversion and storage, and extremely high-density magnetic recording. His group conducts research in the Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials (GLAM), Stanford Nanofabrication Facility (SNF) and Stanford Nano Shared Facilities (SNSF), Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence (CCNE) hosted at Stanford, and Stanford Cancer Institute. The Center for Magnetic Nanotechnology (formerly CRISM) he directs has close ties with the Information Storage Industry and co-sponsors The Magnetic Recording Conference (TMRC).

  • Stanford Molecular Imaging Scholars (SMIS)

Shan X. Wang

Materials Sci & Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Radiology-MIPS
Professor
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Materials Sci & Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Radiology-MIPS


Last Updated: March 17, 2022

Prof. Wang directs the Center for Magnetic Nanotechnology and is a leading expert in biosensors, information storage and spintronics. His research and inventions span across a variety of areas including magnetic biochips, in vitro diagnostics, cancer biomarkers, magnetic nanoparticles, magnetic sensors, magnetoresistive random access memory, and magnetic integrated inductors. 

  • Cancer-Translational Nanotechnology Training Program (Cancer-TNT)
  • Stanford Molecular Imaging Scholars (SMIS)
  • Other

Peter Yang

Orthopedic Surgery, Materials Sci & Engineering, Bioengineering
Associate Professor
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Orthopedic Surgery, Materials Sci & Engineering, Bioengineering


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Biomaterials, medical devices, drug delivery, stem cells and 3D bioprinting for musculoskeletal tissue engineering

Ovijit Chaudhuri

Mechanical Engineering
Assistant Professor
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Mechanical Engineering


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

My group is interested in elucidating the mechanics of cell-matrix interactions in soft tissues. We seek to understand how the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix regulate processes such as breast cancer progression, stem cell differentiation, and cell division. Further, we aim to determine the biophysics of cell migration and division in confining 3D microenvironments. Our approach involves the use of engineered biomaterials for 3D cell culture and instrumentation to measure forces at the microscale relevant to cells.

Eric Darve

Mechanical Engineering, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering
Professor
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Mechanical Engineering, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering


Last Updated: August 15, 2023

Wendy Gu

Mechanical Engineering
Assistant Professor

Mechanical Engineering


Last Updated: June 28, 2022

- Mechanical behavior of nanomaterials and nanostructured metals

- Nano and metal additive manufacturing

- Materials at extreme conditions (e.g. high pressure)

- Materials for sustainability (e.g. hydrogen economy, batteries)

Wendy Gu

Mechanical Engineering
Assistant Professor
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Mechanical Engineering


Last Updated: January 27, 2023

Mechanics and Manufacturing. Development of novel materials for additive manufacturing such as nanocomposite two photon lithography resins, and metal-ceramic magnetic composites. Mechanics of energy materials (battery materials, materials for the hydrogen economy). Structural materials such as lightweight alloys and metallic glasses. 

Matthias Ihme

Mechanical Engineering
Professor
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Mechanical Engineering


Last Updated: November 29, 2021

Our research is concerned with the computational modeling and the experimental investigation of fluids in complex environments, including chemical reactions, phase transition, and heterogeneous flow environment. We addressing fundamental scientific questions, problems pertaining to energy-conversion and propulsion, as well as environmental issues related to wildfire predictions, carbon-capture and sequestration, and water desalination. We are developing advanced numerical algorithms, detailed physical models, and physics-informed and data-driven methods. Experimentally, our research employs X-ray absorption and scattering techniques  that involve X-ray Computed Tomography at laboratory and synchrotron sources, X-ray spectroscopy, and ultrafast X-ray techniques at the Linac Coherent Light Source to observe processes at sub-picosecond timescales.

Department URL:
https://me.stanford.edu

Matthias Ihme

Mechanical Engineering
Professor
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Mechanical Engineering


Last Updated: January 12, 2022

Research activities in our group focus on the computational modeling and experimental analysis of turbulent and chemically reacting flows. Applications include propulsion systems, renewable energy, carbon sequestration, and high-speed and multiphase flows. Particular emphasis is directed towards improving the fundamental understanding of underlying physical processes involving the coupling between turbulence, reaction chemistry, pollutant formation and noise emission. Our research approach combines classical theoretical analysis tools (including linear stability analysis, rapid distortion theory, and stochastic models), numerical models, and the utilization of direct numerical simulation (DNS) results for the development, analysis, and validation of computational models. Current research interests include:

  • Fundamental analysis of non-equilibrium and supercritical flows
  • Heat-transfer and boundary layers
  • High-order numerical techniques for chemically reacting flows
  • Development of models for application to kinetics-controlled combustion, including auto-ignition, low-temperature combustion, and combustion-dynamic processes
  • Particle-laden flows and atmospheric entry
  • Heterogeneous flows in micro-, meso-, and nano-porous flows
  • CO2 capture and sequestration

Another active area of research involves the experimental analysis of ultrafast non-equilibrium processes using X-ray diffraction and spectroscopy, specfically focusing on sub-picosecond physico-chemical processes in complex fluids and chemical systems. For this, we're closely working with the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, the Advanced Light Source at LBNL and other facility to perform X-ray experiments.

 

 

Alison Marsden

Pediatrics, Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, Cardiovascular Med Institute
Associate Professor
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Pediatrics, Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, Cardiovascular Med Institute


Last Updated: August 09, 2020

The Cardiovascular Biomechanics Computation Lab  develops fundamental computational methods for the study of cardiovascular disease progression, surgical methods, treatment planning and medical devices.  We focus on patient-specific modeling in pediatric and congenital heart disease, as well as adult cardiovascular disease.  Our lab bridges engineering and medicine through the departments of Pediatrics, Bioengineering, and the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering. We develop the SimVascular open source project.

  • Mechanisms in Innovation in Vascular Disease
  • Multi-Disciplinary Training Program in Cardiovascular Imaging at Stanford

Michaelle Mayalu

Mechanical Engineering
Assistant Professor
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Mechanical Engineering


Last Updated: November 02, 2022

We are an interdisciplinary research laboratory that focuses on model-based analysis, design, and control of biological function at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels to optimize therapeutic intervention.

Near-future research directions

  • Design and implementation targeted synthetic microbe therapies
  • Interorgan communication in health and disease
  • Synthetic pattern formation in growing microbial populations

The Mayalu Lab is seeking bright, talented, and motivated graduate students and postdocs to fill several positions.

These are great opportunities to work on control theoretic and experimental aspects of model-based design of synthetic biological and biomedical systems. 

Postdocs with additional training in synthetic microbiology, genetic recombination technology, bioengineering or related fields are encouraged to apply to help launch the experimental research program.

Beverley McKeon

Mechanical Engineering, Center for Turbulence Research (CTR), Mechanical Engineering
Professor
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Mechanical Engineering, Center for Turbulence Research (CTR), Mechanical Engineering


Last Updated: November 26, 2023

Our lab focuses on experimental, data-driven and theoretical work in turbulent and unsteady flows, as they impact problems in aerodynamics, hydrodynamics, climate and energy. We have particular interests in developing hybrid approaches that exploit power of data, real-time sensing and actuation, modeling and machine learning to create innovative flow states and engineering capabilities.

Juan G. Santiago

Mechanical Engineering
Professor
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Mechanical Engineering


Last Updated: January 28, 2022

We invent and develop systems which couple fluid flow, chemical reactions, mass transport, heat transfer, and/or electric fields and apply these to chemical and biological assays.  We design, build, and test microfluidic devices that couple electrokinetics with chemical reactions for on-chip analyses of DNA and high-throughput flow systems for cell assays.  We have two funded projects for which we seek a motivated postdoctoral researcher:

1. We are developing a microfluidic device for fully automated detection of the RNA of SARS-CoV-2 RNA (the virus which causes Covid-19) in less than 60 min.  The device will feature electric field control and enhancement of four processes: RNA extraction, reverse transcription, LAMP amplification, and highly specific detection using CRISPR/Cas enzymes.  See a preliminary version of this assay here:  Ramachandran et al., PNAS, 117, 47 (2020).

2. We are conducting a fundamental study of CRISPR/Cas enzymes with the goal of exploring the ultimate sensitivity of CRISPR-based diagnostic systems.  This work includes developing experimentally validated models of enzyme kinetics and detailed models for the signal-to-noise ratio associated with CRISPR diagnostics.  See Ramachandran & Santiago, Analytical Chem., 93, 20 (2021).

Department URL:
https://me.stanford.edu

Sindy Tang

Mechanical Engineering, Bioengineering, Radiology
Associate Professor
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Mechanical Engineering, Bioengineering, Radiology


Last Updated: August 24, 2023

Postdoctoral Research Fellow – Cell biology & microfluidics, UCSF & Stanford

A joint postdoc position between the labs of Wallace Marshall (UCSF) and Sindy Tang (Stanford) is immediately available in the area of single-cell wound healing. The broad question we aim to answer is how the single-celled ciliate Stentor can heal drastic wounds. We are looking for a candidate with a background in cell biology or related fields. This position will allow ample opportunities to learn new techniques including microfluidics for single-cell manipulation and mathematical modeling.

Application
For questions or applications (see below), please feel free to reach out to Prof. Wallace Marshall (wallace.ucsf@gmail.com) or Prof. Sindy Tang (sindy@stanford.edu). To apply, please include a CV (with a publication list) and some detail about your background and interest in the project.

Project description:
Biomechanical mechanisms conferring wound resilience in single-celled organisms
Stentor coeruleus is a large, single-celled ciliate that has remarkable wound healing and regenerative capacity (see Slabodnick et al., Current Bio, 2014 https://journals.plos.org/plosbiology/article?id=10.1371/journal.pbio.10...). It is found in environments that can be subject to high mechanical stresses due to natural flows or predation. The overall goal of this project is to investigate how this organism employs both mechanical and biochemical mechanisms upstream of wounding for wound prevention, as well as downstream of wounding for robust healing from wounds (https://bmcbiol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12915-021-00970-0).

We have sequenced the Stentor genome, and developed tools for molecular manipulation of Stentor gene expression to pave the way to a molecular understanding of Stentor wound response.   This project involves conceptualization of a novel chemical screen to test the role of the cytoskeleton in conferring wound resistance to the cell, and the role of large-scale mechanical force generation in complementing biochemical healing modes to close wounds of increasing severity.

Some questions we ask are: how does Stentor cell mechanics give rise to wound resistance? How do cells respond to shear or other types of stresses? What molecular pathways are important in Stentor wound healing, and are they the same as in other eukaryotes?
The project combines cell biology, microfluidics for precise wounding (see Blauch et al., PNAS 2017 https://www.pnas.org/doi/abs/10.1073/pnas.1705059114), and mechanobiology modeling.

Required Qualifications:
Desired skills for this project include:
• Cell biology
• Chemical screen
• RNAi and genetic transformation
• Past experience with Stentor, other ciliates, or manipulation (e.g., microinjection) of large cells or embryos such as Drosophila
• Mathematical modelling of cellular processes
Candidates proficient in certain skills outlined above will have opportunities to receive training in complementary skill sets.

Required Application Materials:
Your CV with a publication list, and some detail about your background and interest in the project.

Sindy Tang

Mechanical Engineering, Bioengineering, Radiology
Associate Professor
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Mechanical Engineering, Bioengineering, Radiology


Last Updated: January 27, 2024

From finger prick tests for blood glucose monitoring to industrial-scale drug screening in pharmaceutical companies, the ability to extract information from scarce volumes of samples quickly and cheaply is key to effective disease management and drug discovery. To this end, microfluidics offers major advantages over conventional liquid handling due to drastic reduction in reagent volume and the precise control of single cells, microtissues, and their microenvironments. The micro-nano-bio lab under the direction of Dr. Sindy Tang aims to develop innovative micro and nanoscale devices that harness mass transport phenomena to enable precise manipulation, measurement, and recapitulation of biological systems, in order to understand the "rules of life" and accelerate precision medicine and material design for a future with better health and environmental sustainability. Our approach involves building new tools to probe biological systems (from single cells to microtissues), and engineering smart materials, synthetic cells & tissues with properties that mimic some of the amazing properties biological systems have. Current research projects include:

 

  • Understanding and accelerating the diagnosis of allergic diseases
  • Biomechanics of single cell wound resilience
  • Tools for advancing cancer research
  • Bottom-up construction of biological systems

Sindy Tang

Mechanical Engineering
Associate Professor
View in Stanford Profiles

Mechanical Engineering


Last Updated: July 14, 2022

The micro-nano-bio lab under the direction of Prof. Sindy Tang aims to develop innovative micro and nanoscale devices that enable precise manipulation, measurement, and recapitulation of biological systems, in order to understand the "rules of life" and accelerate precision medicine and material design for a future with better health and environmental sustainability. Current projects include: food allergy diagnostics, single cell wound repair, microdissection of multicellular structures for organoids and spatial biology. Check out our website for latest updates.

Sindy Tang

Mechanical Engineering
Associate Professor
View in Stanford Profiles

Mechanical Engineering


Last Updated: February 10, 2023

Two postdoc positions in the lab of Prof. Sindy Tang are immediately available in the areas of microfluidics, nanofabrication, and spatial proteomics.

The spatial organization of proteins within biological tissues plays a critical role in the normal functioning of the tissue and disease development. The goal of this NIH-funded project is to develop a high throughput and scalable technology to perform tissue microdissection that preserves tissue spatial information and couples directly to established LC-MS/MS workflow for deep and unbiased spatial mapping of the proteome. Our approach integrates a novel tissue micro-dicing device, a nanodroplet sample preparation platform for LC-MS/MS analysis with single-cell sensitivity, and novel microfluidic device to transfer the diced tissue pixels while preserving their spatial order. This position will allow exciting opportunities to collaborate with the Pacific Northwest National Lab and the Stanford School of Medicine. 

The project is expected to accelerate MS-based spatial proteomics for deep and unbiased mapping of tissue heterogeneity down to single-cell resolution, thereby accelerating biomedical research and clinical diagnostics towards a better understanding of the role of tissue heterogeneity in pathophysiology, such as the role of the tumor microenvironment on cancer initiation and progression. The deep and unbiased proteome coverage will enable the discovery of novel protein biomarkers and molecular pathways to identify new therapeutic targets, which would be difficult using antibody-based approaches. Our ability to quantitatively map ECM and secreted proteins will facilitate the elucidation of the role of ECM, such as their remodeling, in disease progression. Finally, while this project focuses on spatial proteomics, we expect our technology and workflow to be extended to other biomolecules that LC-MS/MS can readily measure, such as lipids and metabolites, thereby opening the opportunity for spatial multi-omic measurements in future studies.


Skills useful for this project include:
• Microfluidics design and integration, and related areas
• Micro- and nanofabrication, e.g., silicon micromachining, high resolution 3D printing
(e.g., Nanoscribe)
• Experience working with biological samples (tissues)

Jan Carette

Microbiology and Immunology
Associate Professor
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Microbiology and Immunology


Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Our lab is interested in the host pathways that determine the susceptibility of humans to viral disease. Viruses constantly evolve to exploit host machineries for their benefit whilst disarming host restriction mechanisms. Discovery of host proteins critical for viral infection illuminates basic aspects of cellular biology, reveals intricate virus host relationships, and leads to potential targets for antiviral therapeutics.

Dylan Dodd

Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology
Assistant Professor
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Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology


Last Updated: January 12, 2022

One of the key ways that the gut microbiome impacts human health is through the production of bioactive metabolites. By understanding how microbes produce these molecules, we aim to develop new approaches to promote human health and treat disease. Our laboratory employs bacterial genetics, metabolomics, and gnotobiotic mouse colonization to uncover the chemistry that underlies host-microbe interactions in the gut.

Elizabeth Egan

Pediatrics, Microbiology and Immunology
Assistant Professor
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Pediatrics, Microbiology and Immunology


Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Malaria is one of the leading causes of childhood morbidity and mortality in the world. The etiologic agent of severe malaria, Plasmodium falciparum, exclusively infects red blood cells during the blood stage of its life cycle, when all of the symptoms of malaria occur. P. falciparum is an obligate intracellular parasite, suggesting that it critically depends on host factors for its biology and pathogenesis. This concept is also supported by population genetic studies, which indicate that humans have evolved certain red cell traits, such as hemoglobinopathies, to protect against malaria. The importance of these host-pathogen interactions raises the possibility that critical red cell factors could serve as targets for new, host-directed therapeutics for malaria. However, our understanding of host determinants for malaria is limited because red cells are enucleated and lack DNA, hindering genetic manipulation. In the Egan laboratory we have surmounted this hurdle by adapting advances from stem cell biology to the study of malaria host factors. Specifically, we have developed approaches to differentiate primary human CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells down the erythroid lineage to enucleated red blood cells that can be infected by P. falciparum. This thus gives us access to the nucleated progenitor cells for genetic modification using RNAi and CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing. We are using these methods to develop forward genetic screens to identify novel host factors for malaria, as well as to perform mechanistic studies to understand the specific functions of critical host factors during the developmental cycle of malaria parasites. In addition, the lab has projects focused on understanding human adaptation to malaria using clinical samples. Our long term goal is to explore the possibility of host-directed therapeutics for malaria.

  • Molecular Basis of Host Parasite Interaction
  • Training in Pediatric Nonmalignant Hematology and Stem Cell Biology

Shirit Einav

Microbiology and Immunology, Med: Infectious Diseases
Associate Professor
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Microbiology and Immunology, Med: Infectious Diseases


Last Updated: January 12, 2022

Our basic research program focuses on understanding the roles of virus-host interactions in viral infection and disease pathogenesis via both molecular and systems virology/immunology single cell approaches. This program is combined with translational efforts to apply this knowledge for the development of broad-spectrum host-centered antiviral approaches to combat emerging viral infections, including dengue, encephalitic alphaviruses, SARS-CoV-2 and Ebola, and means to predict disease progression.

Our studies focus on the following emerging concepts that are transforming our understanding of virus-host interactions:

1. Understanding the pathogenesis of flaviviral infections via an integrative systems immunology single cell approach. The goal of this project is to elucidate the cellular and molecular factors contributing to increased severity of dengue and Zika disease in distinct patient populations (children, adults, pregnant women). To achieve this goal, we are advancing and utilizing various single-cell immunological approaches (virus-inclusive single cell RNA-seq, CyTOF etc) and samples from our large Colombia dengue cohort (>500 patients) and Zika cohort. We are mapping an atlas of viral immune cellular targets and studying critical protective and pathogenic elements of the host response to these viruses in multiple distinct infected and bystander cell subtypes with an unprecedented resolution. The translational goals of this project are to identify candidate biomarkers associated with infection outcome and candidate targets for antiviral therapy, as well as improve vaccine strategies.

2. Deciphering the intracellular membrane trafficking pathways essential for viral pathogens. We have used proteomic and genetic approaches to identify proteins that are critical for the replication of multiple globally relevant RNA viruses including dengue virus, Zika virus, encephalitis alphaviruses, SARS-CoV-2, hepatitis C virus, and Ebola virus. We are studying the molecular mechanisms by which these viruses hijack intracellular membrane trafficking pathways for mediating key steps in their viral life cycle and are characterizing the roles these factors play in cellular biology using viruses as complexed probes. Ongoing work focuses on the roles of cellular kinases and adaptor protein complexes in viral trafficking during viral entry, assembly, release, and direct cell-to-cell spread, the role of the ESCRT machinery in intracellular viral budding, and the roles of ubiquitin signaling pathways in the regulation of trafficking during viral assembly and release.

3. Advancing the development of small molecules targeting host functions as broad-spectrum antivirals. Most direct antiviral strategies targeting viral enzymes provide a “one drug, one bug” approach and are associated with the emergence of viral resistance. We have discovered several host functions exploited by multiple viruses as targets for broad-spectrum antivirals. We have demonstrated the utility of a repurposed approach that inhibits these factors in suppressing replication of multiple RNA viruses both in vitro and in mouse models and are advancing this approach into the clinic and studying its mechanism of action. In parallel, we are developing chemically distinct small molecules targeting various cellular functions as pharmacological tools to study cell biology and viral infection and as broad-spectrum antivirals to combat SARS-CoV-2, dengue virus, encephalitic alphaviruses and Ebola virus.

  • Clinical Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases

Matthias Garten

Microbiology and Immunology, Bioengineering
Assistant Professor
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Microbiology and Immunology, Bioengineering


Last Updated: August 31, 2023

With a creative, collaborative, biophysical mindset, we aim to understand the ability of parasites to interface with their host-cell to a point at which we can exploit the mechanisms not only for finding cures against the disease the parasites cause but also to make parasite mechanisms a tool that we can use to engineer the host’s cells. By developing approaches that allow a quantitative understanding and manipulation of molecular transport our research transforms parasites from agents of disease to tools for health.

Specifically, we are studying how the malaria parasite takes control over red blood cells. By learning the biophysical principles of transport in between the host and the parasite we can design ways to kill the parasite or exploit it to reengineer red blood cells. The transport we study is broadly encompassing everything from ions to lipids and proteins. We use variations of quantitative microscopy and electrophysiology to gain insight into the unique strategies the parasite evolved to survive.

  • Molecular Basis of Host Parasite Interaction

Michael Howitt

Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology
Assistant Professor
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Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Our lab is broadly interested in how intestinal microbes shape our immune system to promote both health and disease. Recently we discovered that a type of intestinal epithelial cell, called tuft cells, act as sentinels stationed along the lining of the gut. Tuft cells respond to microbes, including parasites, to initiate type 2 immunity, remodel the epithelium, and alter gut physiology. Surprisingly, these changes to the intestine rely on the same chemosensory pathway found in oral taste cells. Currently, we aim to 1) elucidate the role of specific tuft cell receptors in microbial detection. 2) To understand how protozoa and bacteria within the microbiota impact host immunity. 3) Discover how tuft cells modulate surrounding cells and tissue.

  • Molecular and Cellular Immunobiology

Juliana Idoyaga

Microbiology and Immunology
Assistant Professor
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Microbiology and Immunology


Last Updated: July 13, 2022

The Idoyaga Lab is focused on the function and biology of very unique cells of the immune system, Dendritic cells (DCs). DCs are specialized antigen-presenting cells that initiate and modulate our body’s immune responses to invading microbes. DCs also play a crucial role in maintaining immune unresponsiveness to our own tissues and environmental and/or innocuous substances. Considering their importance in orchestrating the quality and quantity of immune responses, DCs are an indisputable target for vaccines and therapies.

  • Molecular and Cellular Immunobiology
  • Molecular Basis of Host Parasite Interaction

Holden Maecker

Microbiology and Immunology
Professor
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Microbiology and Immunology


Last Updated: July 14, 2022

A major aim of our lab is to define metrics of immune competence in various settings, including cancer immunotherapy, organ transplantation, allergy, and chronic viral infection. We use CyTOF mass cytometry, often in combination with other technologies, to broadly survey immune features at the cellular level, then examine links between features or groups of features and clinical outcome. A long-term goal is to create an assay of global immune competence that could predict risk for various immune-related outcomes in both healthy individuals and in disease.

  • Molecular and Cellular Immunobiology

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