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PRISM Mentors

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PRISM supports all faculty in recruiting postdocs. The faculty listed on this page have expressed special interest in the PRISM program and may be actively recruiting. This is one of many ways to identify potential postdoc mentors; also review the guidance and links in the PRISM Application Guide for other ways to explore Stanford faculty. As you look for potential postdoc mentors, consider how faculty research interests align with your own.

Faculty: to create a profile, click "Log In" at the top right corner, then the "PRISM Faculty Opt In" button below. To edit an existing profile, click "Log In" at the top right corner, then the "Edit" button under your name/department/URL.

 

PRISM Faculty Opt-In   Displaying 51 - 100 of 568
PRISM mentor Research Interests

Ashby Morrison

Biology
Associate Professor
View in Stanford Profiles

Biology


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

The regulation of chromatin structure is essential for all eukaryotic organisms. Our research interests are to determine the contribution of chromatin to mechanisms that maintain genomic integrity and metabolic homeostasis in the context of disease and development. We utilize a varied experimental approach that includes computational, biochemical, molecular and cellular assays in both yeast and mammalian systems to ascertain the contribution of chromatin remodelers and histone modifiers to carcinogen susceptibility and metabolic gene expression. We hope to contribute to the formulation of epigenetic therapies that treat genomic and metabolic dysfunction, which influence cancer, heart disease, and diabetes to name a few.

  • Cancer Etiology, Prevention, Detection and Diagnosis
  • Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Training Program
  • Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism
  • Institutional Training Grant in Genome Science
  • Postdoctoral Training in the Radiation Sciences
  • Stanford Training Program in Aging Research
  • Stanford Training Program in Lung Biology

Lauren O'Connell

Biology, Neuroscience Institute
Assistant Professor

Biology, Neuroscience Institute


Last Updated: August 10, 2020

We study how genetic and environmental factors contribute to biological diversity and adaptation. We are particularly interested in understanding (1) how behavior evolves through changes in brain function and (2) how animal physiology evolves through repurposing existing cellular components.
Our mission is to perform rigorous, ethical, and ecologically relevant science across many areas of organismal biology. We aspire to maintain an environment that fosters creativity, diversity, and inclusion as well as engagement with communities in the areas where we work.
We stand in solidarity with the BlackLivesMatter Movement. Scientists and the institutions we work in are complicit in centuries of racism and we will hold ourselves and our institutions accountable by using lab meetings to reflect on our own privileges and by demanding action from Stanford University. We will continue supporting the careers of our Black colleagues by inviting them to seminars, reading their papers, and promoting their work through collaboration and our social media spaces. We are committed to including classrooms in predominantly Black neighborhoods to our Froggers School Program.

Kabir Peay

Biology
Associate Professor
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Biology


Last Updated: August 10, 2020

I study how ecological communities assemble and influence ecosystem processes, focusing on the role of microbial symbioses, which are ubiquitous in plants and animals. My research is driven primarily by intellectual curiosity about the unseen organisms that shape our planet, but is also aimed to provide knowledge that can be used to better manage ecosystem responses to global change, agriculture, and human health.
My lab uses a combination of ecological theory, molecular biology techniques, and field and laboratory experiments to study microbial communities. Our lab works across a large range of systems, both geographically and ecologically. We work on a number of local projects in the SF Bay Area, across North America, and in tropical rainforests of South American and Southeast Asia. We also study a wide range of interactions, from decomposer bacteria and fungi that are key agents of elemental cycling, to pathogenic fungi  and mutualistic fungi. While I am open to working on a variety of systems, a large portion of my work has  focused on root-fungal mutualisms, known  as mycorrhizal symbiosis, because nearly all plants species, including >98% of all trees, use these partnerships to acquire the soil macronutrients that most limit plant growth and ecosystem productivity. While we now know that such microbial mutualisms are common, there has been far less ecological research on mutualisms compared with antagonistic interactions, such as competition and predation. I ask (a) what controls mycorrhizal community assembly across spatial scales, (b) how mycorrhizal symbiosis structures plant communities, and (c) how mycorrhizal symbiosis is linked to ecosystem processes. By integrating these three topics I seek to build a roots-to-biomes understanding of ecological communities and ecosystem function.

Naima Sharaf

Biology
Assistant Professor
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Biology


Last Updated: August 25, 2021

Proteins embedded in the cell envelope of bacteria perform multiple important functions, including signaling, nutrient acquisition, and export of virulence factors. Understanding the structure and functions of these proteins is critical for the development of new anti-bacterial therapies. Currently, the lab focuses on both ABC transporters and lipoproteins of Gram-negative bacteria. The ultimate goal of the research to translate basic lipoprotein research into novel therapuetics.

My goal as a mentor is to contribute to my mentees’ scientific and professional development by leveraging their strengths and providing them with the tools and resources they need to pursue their desired careers. My mentoring philosophy relies on (1) maintaining honest and open communication, (2) providing feedback and guidance, (3) setting clear expectations, and (4) creating a supportive and inclusive learning environment.

Jan Skotheim

Biology
Professor
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Biology


Last Updated: August 10, 2020

My overarching goal is to understand how cell growth triggers cell division. Linking growth to division is important because it allows cells to maintain a specific size range to best perform their physiological functions. For example, red blood cells must be small enough to flow through small capillaries, whereas macrophages must be large enough to engulf pathogens. In addition to being important for normal cell and tissue physiology, the link between growth and division is misregulated in cancer.

Today, thanks to decades of research into the question of how cells control division, we have an extensive, likely nearly complete parts-list of key regulatory proteins. Deletion, inhibition, or over-expression of these proteins often results in changes to cell size. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms for how growth triggers division are not understood.  How do the regulatory proteins work together to produce a biochemical activity reflecting cell size or growth? Since we now have most of the parts, the next step to solving this fundamental question is to better understand how they work together.

Alice Ting

Biology, Genetics, Chemistry
Professor
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Biology, Genetics, Chemistry


Last Updated: January 12, 2022

We are a chemical biology laboratory focused on the development of technologies to map molecules, cells, and functional circuits. We apply the technologies to understand signaling in the mitochondria and in the mammalian brain.

Our technologies probe molecules and functional networks at both the sub-cellular and multi-cellular level, leveraging our laboratory’s unique strengths in chemical synthesis, protein engineering, directed evolution, proteomics, and microscopy. While we strive to develop technologies that are broadly applicable across biology, we also pursue applications of our methods to neuroscience and mitochondrial biology in our own laboratory and through collaborations.

Our research program is broadly divided into three areas: (1) molecular recorders for scalable, single-cell recording of past cellular events; (2) molecular editors for the precise manipulation of cellular biomolecules, pathways, and organelles; and (3) proximity labeling for unbiased discovery of functional molecules.

 

Zhiyong Wang

Biology
Associate Professor
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Biology


Last Updated: October 02, 2020

The goal of our research is to illucidate the signaling mechanisms that regulate plant growth and environmental responses. Plants have remarkable ability to alter growth and development in response to environmental signals. In fact, this ability is essential for their survival in nature as sessile organisms and is also a major target for breeding high-yield crops. My lab has dissected the signaling networks that integrate hormonal (brassinosteroid, auxin, gibberellin), environmental (light, temperature, pathogens), and nutritional (sugar) signals in regulating plant growth. We use a wide range of approaches including proteomic, genomic, and genetic approaches in Arabidopsis and algae. Our research has focused on the brassinosteroid (BR) signaling pathway, which is the best understood receptor kinase signaling pathway in plants. We have elucidated how this steroid signal is transduced from the receptor kinase BRI1 to the transcription factor BZR1, and how BR crosstalks with other growth hormones, light, temperature, pathogen, and sugar signals in optimizing shoot and root growth. Current focuses of our lab include: (1) How does nutrient signaling through O-linked glycosylation (O-GlcNAc and O-fucose modifications) regulate plant growth? (2) How does sugar-dependent O-glycosylation crosstalk with BR-dependent phosphorylation in regulating transcription, RNA splicing, and translation? (3) How do GSK3 kinase and BSU phosphatase regulate cell division and membrane trafficking? (4) How do receptor kinases maintain cell wall integrity during cell growth and under stress?

Ngan Huang

Cardiothoracic Surgery
Assistant Professor
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Cardiothoracic Surgery


Last Updated: August 11, 2020

Dr. Huang’s laboratory aims to understand the chemical and mechanical interactions between extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and pluripotent stem cells that regulate vascular and myogenic differentiation. The fundamental insights of cell-matrix interactions are applied towards stem cell-based therapies with respect to improving cell survival and regenerative capacity, as well as engineered vascularized tissues for therapeutic implantation. Current projects focus on the role of naturally-derived ECMs to enhance endothelial differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells on two-dimensional ECM microarrays of varying substrate rigidity. The knowledge gained from understanding cell-ECM interactions are applied towards engineering prevascularized skeletal or cardiac muscle constructs using nanotopographical cues derived from nanofibrillar ECMs. We have an opening currently for a postdoctoral fellow to develop vascularized skeletal muscle tissues for treatment of traumatic muscle injury.

  • Mechanisms in Innovation in Vascular Disease
  • Training in Myocardial Biology at Stanford (TIMBS)

Ngan Huang

Cardiothoracic Surgery
Associate Professor
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Cardiothoracic Surgery


Last Updated: January 23, 2024

Dr. Huang's laboratory aims to understand the chemical and mechanical interactions between extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and pluripotent stem cells that regulate vascular and myogenic function. The fundamental insights of cell-matrix interactions are applied towards stem cell-based therapies with respect to improving cell survival and regenerative capacity, as well as engineered vascularized tissues for therapeutic transplantation. Current projects focus on various aspects of mechanical and physical factors on tissue regeneration. Examples include:

1) Cellular Biomechanics for in High Through Chemical Screening: To develop new technology for high-throughput quantitative assessment of vascular endothelial cell biomechanics for cardiovascular drug screening. We hypothesize that cellular biomechanics can be a predictive biomarker of endothelial health.

2) Engineered Matrix Microarrays to Enhance the Regenerative Potential of iPSC-Derived Endothelial Cells: We propose to develop a combinatorial family of engineered ECMs (eECMs) with independently tunable biochemical and biomechanical cues, including stiffness and stress relaxation rate for high-throughput, matrix array studies of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cell (iPSC-EC) survival and angiogenic potential. The optimally designed eECMs will then be coinjected with iPSC-EC for treatment of peripheral arterial disease in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia (Sponsor: NIH).

3) iPSC-Derived Smooth Muscle Progenitors for Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: We propose to deliver human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived smooth muscle progenitors to the site of abdominal aortic aneurysm will replenish smooth muscle cells, enhance elastin production, and abrogate wall dilatation in a murine model (Sponsor: CIRM).

4) Vascularized Cardiac Patch with Physiological Orientation for Myocardial Repair: The aims are to engineer a vascularized aligned iPSC-derived CM (cardiomyocyte) patch and elucidating the molecular mechanisms of ECM-mediated nitric oxide signaling in enhancing iPSC-CM survival and phenotype; and to determine the therapeutic effect of a vascularized aligned iPSC-derived CM patch for treatment of myocardial infarction (Sponsor: Dept of Veteran Affairs).

5) Other ongoing research areas: mRNA-based therapeutics, exosome biologics, microgravity effects on tissue regeneration and dysfunction, 3D bioprinting of engineered skeletal muscle, viscoelasticity effects on endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition, electro-osmosis for treatment of lymphedema, tissue chips for stem cell manufacturing

Dr. Huang's laboratory research is funded by the National Institues of Health, Department of Defense, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, National Science Foundation, and the Department of Veteran Affairs.

  • Mechanisms in Innovation in Vascular Disease
  • Training in Myocardial Biology at Stanford (TIMBS)

Ioannis Karakikes

Cardiothoracic Surgery
Assistant Professor
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Cardiothoracic Surgery


Last Updated: December 02, 2021

The Karakikes Lab investigates the molecular mechanisms of rare cardiac diseases, such as dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). We employ an interdisciplinary approach, integrating functional genomics approaches in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) derived cardiovascular cells with single-cell transcriptomics and epigenetics to study cardiomyopathies in a genetically controlled and systematic manner.

James Chen

Chemical and Systems Biology
Professor
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Chemical and Systems Biology


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Our laboratory integrates synthetic chemistry, genetics, and developmental biology to investigate the molecular mechanisms that control tissue formation, regeneration, and oncogenic transformation. Our research group is currently focused on three major areas: (1) small-molecule and genetic regulators of the Hedgehog signaling pathway; (2) optochemical and optogenetic tools for studying tissue patterning with spatiotemporal precision; and (3) zebrafish models of vertebrate development.

Dan Jarosz

Chemical and Systems Biology, Developmental Biology
Associate Professor
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Chemical and Systems Biology, Developmental Biology


Last Updated: June 30, 2022

Protein self-assembly in evolution, disease, and development; Systems biology of aging;  Mutational robustness in cancer and pathogens; Quantitative analysis of evolving genotype-to-phenotoype maps. Epigenetic control of interspecies interactions.

Nicole Martinez

Chemical and Systems Biology, Developmental Biology
Assistant Professor
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Chemical and Systems Biology, Developmental Biology


Last Updated: February 10, 2023

The Martinez lab studies RNA regulatory mechanisms that control gene expression. We focus on mRNA processing, RNA modifications and their roles in development and disease.

Gary Peltz

Chemical and Systems Biology
Professor
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Chemical and Systems Biology


Last Updated: January 12, 2022

The Peltz laboratory develops and uses state of the art genetic, genomic and stem cell technologies in its research programs. These methodologies are used to discover the mechanisms mediating disease susceptibility and drug response, and to develop new therapies. As one example, we developed a novel computational genetic analysis method, which has identified genetic factors affecting disease susceptibility and biomedical responses in mouse models. One of the genetic findings is the basis for an ongoing clinical trial that tests a new therapy for preventing opiate withdrawal from occuring in babies born to mothers that take opiates. Over 25 genetic factors affecting susceptibility to drug addiction, chronic pain, infectious diseases, and others have been identified. An ongoing effort is now analyzing 10000 biomedical responses in panels of inbred mouse strains. Single-cell RNA sequencing and metabolic analysis are used to identify developmental and disease-causing pathways. Stem cell-based methods for liver engineering are also used. As examples of this, the Peltz lab has produced mice with humanized livers that are used to improve drug safety; developed methods to engineer human liver from adipocyte stem cells; and to produce human liver organoids from stem cells, which are used for studying the pathogenesis of human genetic liver diseases.

  • Anesthesia Training Grant in Biomedical Research

Kacper Rogala

Structural Biology, Chemical and Systems Biology
Assistant Professor
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Structural Biology, Chemical and Systems Biology


Last Updated: June 23, 2022

How are nutrients recognized by their protein sensors? How is their transport across cellular and intracellular membranes regulated? And, how is nutrient sensing integrated with other chemical signals, such as hormones, to determine cellular decisions, especially the decision: to grow or not to grow?

We are a team of structural and chemical biologists aiming to answer these fundamental questions at the level of ångstroms, nanometers, and micrometers. Many proteins in these pathways are deregulated in cancer, and our mission is to first reveal the mechanism of action of these proteins, and then use that knowledge to develop targeted chemical probes to modulate their activity in cells and organisms.


Our lab is friendly to trainees from all walks of life, and we cherish trust, inclusiveness and intellectual curiosity, where no question is too big to study, as long as we have the right approach and a unique angle. Most importantly, our lab operates with a growth mindset for all of our trainees, and we put a heavy emphasis on training and skills development — across a wide range of experimental and computational techniques. And through collaboration, strong work ethic, seeking feedback, and trying out new strategies, we drive innovation and novel discoveries for our team.

If this is something you might be interested in, please contact Kacper directly. We are always on the lookout for driven postdocs! Especially, we want cell biologists and biochemists to join our team and to contribute your unique skillsets to a number of collaborative projects.

Monther Abu-Remaileh

Chemical Engineering
Assistant Professor
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Chemical Engineering


Last Updated: August 10, 2020

We are interested in identifying novel pathways that enable cellular and organismal adaptation to metabolic stress and changes in environmental conditions. We also study how these pathways go awry in human diseases such as cancer, neurodegeneration and metabolic syndrome, in order to engineer new therapeutic modalities.


To address these questions, our lab uses a multidisciplinary approach to study the biochemical functions of the lysosome in vitro and in vivo. Lysosomes are membrane-bound compartments that degrade macromolecules and clear damaged organelles to enable cellular adaptation to various metabolic states. Lysosomal function is critical for organismal homeostasis—mutations in genes encoding lysosomal proteins cause severe human disorders known as lysosomal storage diseases, and lysosome dysfunction is implicated in age-associated diseases including cancer, neurodegeneration and metabolic syndrome.


By developing novel tools and harnessing the power of metabolomics, proteomics and functional genomics, our lab will define 1) how the lysosome communicates with other cellular compartments to fulfill the metabolic demands of the cell under various metabolic states, 2) and how its dysfunction leads to rare and common human diseases. Using insights from our research, we will engineer novel therapies to modulate the pathways that govern human disease.

Zhenan Bao

Chemical Engineering
K.K. Lee Professor of Chemical Engineering, Director, Stanford Wearable Electronics Initiative (eWEAR), Faculty affiliate, Wu Tsai Neuroscience Institute, ChEM-H, Precourt Institute, BioX
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Chemical Engineering


Last Updated: January 28, 2023

We are working closely with colleagues in Science, Engineering and Medicine to advance the use of soft electronics for wearable and implantable electronics for precision health, precision mental health and advance the understanding of neuroscience. Her group has developed foundational materials and devices that enabled a a new generation of skin-inspired soft electronics. They open up unprecedented opportunities for understanding human health and developing monitoring, diagnosis and treatment tools. A few recent examples include: a wireless tuner growth monitoring tool, a wireless wound healing patch, a soft neurostring for simultaneous neurochemical monitoring in the brain and gut, and Mentaid: a wearable for monitoring mental health. Our work engage students and postdocs with training background in chemistry, chemical engineering, material science and engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering or bioengineering.

Zhenan Bao

Chemical Engineering
Professor
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Chemical Engineering


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Bao’s research focuses on fundamental understanding of molecular design rules for organic electronic materials. She pioneered a number of molecular design concepts for efficient charge transport in organic electronic materials. Her work has enabled flexible electronic circuits and displays. In the decade, she pioneered the field of skin-inspired organic electronic materials, which resulted in unprecedented performance or functions in wearable and implantable medical devices and energy storage applications.

The major research directions of Bao Group currently include developing materials and devices for understanding brain-gut axis, large-area high resolution soft electronic electrophysiology from brain, heart, intestine and muscle, wearable for mental health monitoring and genetically-targeted chemical assemblies in brain and peripheral nerve for brain-machine interface.

Department URL:
https://cheme.stanford.edu

  • Cancer-Translational Nanotechnology Training Program (Cancer-TNT)

Zhenan Bao

Chemical Engineering
Professor
View in Stanford Profiles

Chemical Engineering


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Skin-inspired electronics, stretchable, self-healing and biodegradable electronic materials and devices, wearable electronics, implantable electronics, polymer for battery applications, conductive metal-organic-framework, high surface area carbon materials, carbon nanotube electronics, organic transistors, sensors, solar cells, soft electronics for neuro-interface

Stacey Bent

Chemical Engineering
Vice Provost for Graduate Education & Postdoctoral Affairs, Professor
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Chemical Engineering


Last Updated: July 14, 2022

The research in our laboratory is focused on understanding and controlling surface and interfacial chemistry and applying this knowledge to a range of problems in semiconductor processing, micro- and nanoelectronics, nanotechnology, and sustainable and renewable energy. Much of our research aims to develop a molecular-level understanding in these technologically important systems. Our group uses a variety of atomic and molecular spectroscopies combined with atomically-precise materials synthesis. Systems currently under study in our group include organic functionalization of semiconductor surfaces, mechanisms and control of atomic layer deposition, molecular layer deposition, area selective deposition processes, nanoscale materials for light absorption, interface engineering in photovoltaics and batteries, and catalyst and electrocatalyst synthesis and characterization.

Joseph DeSimone

Radiology-MIPS, Chemical Engineering
Professor
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Radiology-MIPS, Chemical Engineering


Last Updated: December 02, 2021

Our interdisciplinary lab pursues research centered around advanced polymer 3D fabrication methods and their applications in human health. Focus areas include (1) creating new digital polymer 3D printing capabilities, such as single-micron resolution printing and novel multi-materials printing methods; (2) synthesizing new polymers for 3D printing, with interests in composites, bioabsorbable materials, and recyclable materials; and (3) employing our 3D printing materials and process advances for clinical applications in areas including: new medical device opportunities; vaccine platform development via the advancement of novel microneedle designs; precision delivery of therapies (molecular and cellular) and vaccines; molecular monitoring; and device-assisted, targeted drug delivery, including for cancer treatment. We also pursue novel digital treatment planning approaches using 3D printed medical devices, with our current focus on pediatric therapeutic devices. In this area, we are working with partners at Stanford to design devices and treatment planning solutions for babies with conditions including cleft palate and Pierre Robin Sequence. Complementing these research areas, our lab also emphasizes entrepreneurship; diversity, equity, and inclusion; implications of the digital revolution in the manufacturing sector; and strategies toward achieving a circular economy.ch

Alex Dunn

Chemical Engineering
Associate Professor
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Chemical Engineering


Last Updated: October 05, 2022

Our group is an eclectic mixture of physicists, biologists and engineers who are all passionately interested in the problem of how living cells self-assemble into structures of often dazzling complexity. Unlike human-engineered systems, for example a car or computer chip, every aspect of cell and tissue function must arise from bottom-up self-assembly. The physical mechanisms that govern this self-assembly process are largely unknown, making this one of the most interesting problems in biological research today. Understanding how biological self-assembly occurs is also of critical practical importance. At present, tissue engineering is largely driven by empirical, trial-and-error approaches. A deeper understanding of the processes that underlie cell and tissue organization will, over the longer term, help drive the transformation of tissue engineering into a discipline with understood and predictable design principles, as is the case, for example, in mechanical or electrical engineering. To tackle this general problem we use techniques drawn from molecular biophysics, cell and developmental biology, and increasingly, computer science. Please check out our web page for details on specific problems, and email Alex for more details. 

  • Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Training Program

Sarah Heilshorn

Materials Sci & Engineering, Bioengineering, Chemical Engineering
Professor, Director, Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials (GLAM)
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Materials Sci & Engineering, Bioengineering, Chemical Engineering


Last Updated: December 01, 2021

Heilshorn's interests include biomaterials in regenerative medicine, engineered proteins with novel assembly properties, microfluidics and photolithography of proteins, and synthesis of materials to influence stem cell differentiation. Current projects include tissue engineering for spinal cord and blood vessel regeneration, designing injectable materials for use in stem cell therapies, and the design of biomaterials for culture of patient-derived biopsies and organoids. Postdoctoral candidates with expertise (or an interest in learning) preclinical animal models of injury and disease are particularly encouraged.

Department URL:
https://mse.stanford.edu

  • Mechanisms in Innovation in Vascular Disease

Chaitan Khosla

Chemistry, Chemical Engineering
Professor
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Chemistry, Chemical Engineering


Last Updated: August 12, 2020

My research interests lie at the interface between chemistry and biology. While ongoing research in my lab focuses on multiple problems, all of these efforts are motivated by the twin goals of shining light on fundamentally new molecular mechanisms in biology and leveraging these insights to address unmet challenges in human health. Two examples of ongoing research themes in my lab are outlined below:

I] Assembly-line biosynthesis of polyketide antibiotics: The primary objective of this longstanding research project in my lab is to understand the enzymatic mechanisms of assembly-line polyketide synthases (PKSs). Having defined the physical boundaries and chemical reactivity of individual domains and modules, our goal now is to understand these assembly lines as integrated metabolic systems. We also seek to understand the genetic mechanisms for extraordinary evolutionary diversification of this family of multifunctional enzymes.

II] Chemical approaches to understanding celiac disease pathogenesis: Over the past two decades, we have made significant contributions to an understanding of celiac disease (CeD) pathogenesis. Furthermore, at each step along the way, we have sought to translate these emerging molecular insights into enhanced disease management tools for CeD patients and their doctors, as illustrated by the translation of two experimental therapeutics from our lab into advanced preclinical/early clinical studies, and the translation of a biomarker discovered in our lab into CeD patients.
 

Chaitan Khosla

Chemistry, Chemical Engineering
Professor
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Chemistry, Chemical Engineering


Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Research in this laboratory focuses on problems where deep insights into enzymology and metabolism can be harnessed to improve human health.
For the past two decades, we have studied and engineered enzymatic assembly lines called polyketide synthases that catalyze the biosynthesis of structurally complex and medicinally fascinating antibiotics in bacteria. An example of such an assembly line is found in the erythromycin biosynthetic pathway. Our current focus is on understanding the structure and mechanism of this polyketide synthase. At the same time, we are developing methods to decode the vast and growing number of orphan polyketide assembly lines in the sequence databases.

For more than a decade, we have also investigated the pathogenesis of celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine, with the goal of discovering therapies and related management tools for this widespread but overlooked disease. Ongoing efforts focus on understanding the pivotal role of transglutaminase 2 in triggering the inflammatory response to dietary gluten in the celiac intestine.

Danielle Mai

Chemical Engineering
Assistant Professor
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Chemical Engineering


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

The Mai Research Group engineers biopolymers, which are the building materials of life. We seek to develop functional biomaterials and to enhance understanding in the physics of soft materials. Molecular-scale biopolymer design presents a unique opportunity to rationally design materials based on biomolecular templates. Moreover, biopolymer engineering incorporates the rich functional landscape of biological systems into responsive biomaterials. We are especially interested in connecting properties across multiple length scales (molecular, microscopic, macroscopic) using experimental methods. We integrate rational biomolecular design, biological and chemical synthesis, and multi-scale characterization techniques to engineer biopolymers with tunable mechanics, stimuli-responsive behavior, and self-healing properties. Initial research efforts address biological systems where deformation is significant, with specific project areas including: (i) muscle-mimetic materials from polypeptides, (ii) biolubricants from bottlebrush polymers, and (iii) selective filters from programmable hydrogels.

Danielle Mai

Chemical Engineering
Assistant Professor
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Chemical Engineering


Last Updated: January 28, 2023

Meagan Mauter

Civil and Environ Engineering, Woods Institute, Chemical Engineering
Associate Professor
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Civil and Environ Engineering, Woods Institute, Chemical Engineering


Last Updated: June 23, 2022

The mission of the Water & Energy Efficiency for the Environment Lab (WE3Lab) is to reduce the cost and carbon intensity of water desalination and reuse. Ongoing research efforts include:

1) developing automated, precise, robust, intensified, modular, and electrified (A-PRIME) water desalination technologies to support a circular water economy;

2) optimizing the coordinated operation of decarbonized water and energy systems; and

3) supporting the design and enforcement of water-energy-food policies (e.g., Effluent Limitation Guidelines, the Clean Power Plan, CA Sustainable Groundwater Management Act, etc.).

Elizabeth Sattely

Chemical Engineering
Associate Professor
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Chemical Engineering


Last Updated: July 13, 2022

My laboratory is focused broadly on plant chemistry and is deeply invested in pathway discovery. Despite the important roles of plant natural products in plant and human health, very few complete plant biosynthetic pathways are known. This lack of knowledge limits our understanding of natural product mode of action in plants and prevents access to engineered pathways. New plant genome sequences and synthetic biology tools have enabled three research areas in my lab: 1) methods for accelerating pathway discovery in plants (especially for clinically used therapeutics), and 2) discovering new molecules from plants that are important for plant fitness, and 3) using metabolic engineering in plants as a tool to systematically and quantitatively determine the impact of plant molecules on human and plant health and ultimately optimize plant fitness and crop nutrient load. I am looking for postdocs who are interested in joining an interdisciplinary team of scientists and engineers to discover how plant natural products are made and their mode of action, and develop new tools for engineering biosynthetic pathways. Our vision is to use engineered biosynthesis to reveal mechanisms by which natural products from plants contribute to plant fitness and human health.

Bianxiao Cui

Chemistry
Professor
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Chemistry


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

My research objective is to develop new biophysical methods to advance current understandings of cellular machinery in the complicated environment of living cells. We bring together state-of-the-art nanotechnology, physical science, engineering and molecular and cell biology, to advance current understandings of biological processes.  Currently, there are two major research directions: (1) Developing nanoscale tools to probe electric activities and cellular processes at the cell-material interface. In this area, we have developed nanoscale electric probes, structural probes and optical probes with high sensitivity and subcellular localization. We identify membrane curvature as one of the crucial biochemical signals that translate nanoscale surface topography into intracellular signaling. (2) Employing optical, magnetic, and optogenetic tools to understand nerve growth factor (NGF) signaling in neurons.  By adapting a variety of microscopy, optogenetic, nanotechnology and biochemical tools, we aim for a deeper understanding of NGF signaling in normal neurons and neurodegenerative diseases.

Chaitan Khosla

Chemistry, Chemical Engineering
Professor
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Chemistry, Chemical Engineering


Last Updated: August 12, 2020

My research interests lie at the interface between chemistry and biology. While ongoing research in my lab focuses on multiple problems, all of these efforts are motivated by the twin goals of shining light on fundamentally new molecular mechanisms in biology and leveraging these insights to address unmet challenges in human health. Two examples of ongoing research themes in my lab are outlined below:

I] Assembly-line biosynthesis of polyketide antibiotics: The primary objective of this longstanding research project in my lab is to understand the enzymatic mechanisms of assembly-line polyketide synthases (PKSs). Having defined the physical boundaries and chemical reactivity of individual domains and modules, our goal now is to understand these assembly lines as integrated metabolic systems. We also seek to understand the genetic mechanisms for extraordinary evolutionary diversification of this family of multifunctional enzymes.

II] Chemical approaches to understanding celiac disease pathogenesis: Over the past two decades, we have made significant contributions to an understanding of celiac disease (CeD) pathogenesis. Furthermore, at each step along the way, we have sought to translate these emerging molecular insights into enhanced disease management tools for CeD patients and their doctors, as illustrated by the translation of two experimental therapeutics from our lab into advanced preclinical/early clinical studies, and the translation of a biomarker discovered in our lab into CeD patients.
 

Chaitan Khosla

Chemistry, Chemical Engineering
Professor
View in Stanford Profiles

Chemistry, Chemical Engineering


Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Research in this laboratory focuses on problems where deep insights into enzymology and metabolism can be harnessed to improve human health.
For the past two decades, we have studied and engineered enzymatic assembly lines called polyketide synthases that catalyze the biosynthesis of structurally complex and medicinally fascinating antibiotics in bacteria. An example of such an assembly line is found in the erythromycin biosynthetic pathway. Our current focus is on understanding the structure and mechanism of this polyketide synthase. At the same time, we are developing methods to decode the vast and growing number of orphan polyketide assembly lines in the sequence databases.

For more than a decade, we have also investigated the pathogenesis of celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine, with the goal of discovering therapies and related management tools for this widespread but overlooked disease. Ongoing efforts focus on understanding the pivotal role of transglutaminase 2 in triggering the inflammatory response to dietary gluten in the celiac intestine.

Eric Kool

Chemistry
Professor
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Chemistry


Last Updated: January 29, 2023

The Kool lab uses the tools of chemistry and biology to study the structures, interactions and biological activities of nucleic acids and the enzymes that process them. Molecular design and synthesis play a major role in this work, followed by analysis of structure and function, both in vitro and in living systems. These studies are aimed at gaining a better basic understanding of biology, and applying this knowledge to practical applications in biomedicine.

Recent research interests include the development of chemical tools for mapping RNA structure and interactions in cells, methods for stabilization and conjugation of RNAs, and the development of probes of DNA repair pathways and their connections to cancer.

Tom Markland

Chemistry
Associate Professor
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Chemistry


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Our research focuses on the theory and simulation of chemical systems to address problems at the interface of quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics, with applications ranging from chemistry and biology to geology and materials science. Our research frequently explores theories of hydrogen bonding, the interplay between structure and dynamics, systems with multiple time and length-scales, and quantum mechanical effects. Particular current interests include proton and electron transfer in materials and enzymatic systems, atmospheric isotope separation, and the control of catalytic chemical reactivity in heterogeneous environments.

Todd Martinez

Chemistry
Professor
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Chemistry


Last Updated: August 11, 2020

Current research in the Martínez Group aims to make molecular modeling both predictive and routine. New approaches to interactive molecular simulation are being developed, in which users interact with a virtual-reality based molecular modeling kit that fully understands quantum mechanics. New techniques to discover heretofore unknown chemical reactions are being developed and tested, exploiting the many efficient methods that the Martínez group has introduced for solving quantum mechanical problems quickly, using a combination of physical/chemical insights and commodity videogaming hardware.

Grant Rotskoff

Chemistry
Assistant Professor
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Chemistry


Last Updated: March 16, 2021

Alice Ting

Biology, Genetics, Chemistry
Professor
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Biology, Genetics, Chemistry


Last Updated: January 12, 2022

We are a chemical biology laboratory focused on the development of technologies to map molecules, cells, and functional circuits. We apply the technologies to understand signaling in the mitochondria and in the mammalian brain.

Our technologies probe molecules and functional networks at both the sub-cellular and multi-cellular level, leveraging our laboratory’s unique strengths in chemical synthesis, protein engineering, directed evolution, proteomics, and microscopy. While we strive to develop technologies that are broadly applicable across biology, we also pursue applications of our methods to neuroscience and mitochondrial biology in our own laboratory and through collaborations.

Our research program is broadly divided into three areas: (1) molecular recorders for scalable, single-cell recording of past cellular events; (2) molecular editors for the precise manipulation of cellular biomolecules, pathways, and organelles; and (3) proximity labeling for unbiased discovery of functional molecules.

 

Sarah Fletcher

Civil and Environ Engineering, Woods Institute
Assistant Professor

Civil and Environ Engineering, Woods Institute


Last Updated: June 27, 2022

We work to advance water resources management to promote resilient and equitable responses to an uncertain future. We develop computational modeling approaches that bridge the natural, built, and social environments. Our approach improves understanding of the water and climate risks that threaten people and the environment, while developing systems-based engineering and policy solutions.

Sarah Fletcher

Civil and Environ Engineering
Assistant Professor

Civil and Environ Engineering


Last Updated: August 27, 2021

Water resources planning under uncertainty

Rishee Jain

Civil and Environ Engineering
Assistant Professor
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Civil and Environ Engineering


Last Updated: July 13, 2022

The Stanford Urban Informatics Lab & SLAC Grid Integration, Systems, and Mobility (GISMo) group are seeking a post-doctoral fellow to work on the Department of Energy sponsored Impact of Demand Response on short and long term building Energy Efficiency Metrics (IDREEM) project. The goal of this project is to answer the following research questions: Does developing DR capabilities within a building generally lead to more or less efficient buildings (over periods of years)? Does implementing EE strategies within a building generally lead to more or less demand response capacity from those buildings (over periods of years)? Do buildings providing grid services via load shifting consume more energy (over the day) than they would have if not providing services? If so, what are the expected long-term energy impacts? The key outcomes are the establishment of comprehensive long-term DR/efficiency trends; assessment of the system-wide cost, efficiency, and emissions associated with DR; add-ons/extensions to commercial building software models that capture the trends; and a variety of reports, papers, and software documenting our models, methods, and results.

Meagan Mauter

Civil and Environ Engineering, Woods Institute, Chemical Engineering
Associate Professor
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Civil and Environ Engineering, Woods Institute, Chemical Engineering


Last Updated: June 23, 2022

The mission of the Water & Energy Efficiency for the Environment Lab (WE3Lab) is to reduce the cost and carbon intensity of water desalination and reuse. Ongoing research efforts include:

1) developing automated, precise, robust, intensified, modular, and electrified (A-PRIME) water desalination technologies to support a circular water economy;

2) optimizing the coordinated operation of decarbonized water and energy systems; and

3) supporting the design and enforcement of water-energy-food policies (e.g., Effluent Limitation Guidelines, the Clean Power Plan, CA Sustainable Groundwater Management Act, etc.).

Nilam Ram

Psychology, Communication
Professor
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Psychology, Communication


Last Updated: February 08, 2022

The Stanford Screenomics Lab is a multidisciplinary group that uses newly available data streams to understand what people actually do on their smartphones, and how the content of their screen experiences relate to health and well-being. We use a variety of computer vision and text analysis tools to extract information from long sequences of screenshots, develop new descriptors of smartphone behavior and smartphone content, and examine how those behavior and content are related to users' emotions, sleep, and mental health. Our lab is committed to global diversity and fostering minority representation in social science, and we collaborate widely with schools and departments across Stanford and other universities.

Nilam Ram

Communication, Psychology
Professor
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Communication, Psychology


Last Updated: February 08, 2022

The Stanford Media & Psychology Lab is a multidisciplinary group focused on design and data analysis techniques for study of media and human behavior, integrating established and new disciplines to accelerate research innovations that foster innovations in psychological theory and social policy. Current research directions include emotional regulation, media and technology use, lifespan development, and new methods for analysis of intensive longitudinal analysis–including analysis of ecological momentary assessment and smartphone sensor data. Our lab is committed to global diversity and fostering minority representation in social science, and we collaborate widely with schools and departments across Stanford and other universities.

Clark Barrett

Computer Science
Professor (Research)
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Computer Science


Last Updated: January 12, 2022

Automated reasoning; satisfiability modulo theories (SMT); formal methods; formal verification; verification of smart contracts; verification of neural networks; AI safety; hardware design productivity and verification.

Michael Bernstein

Computer Science
Associate Professor
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Computer Science


Last Updated: January 24, 2022

I design, build, and study social computing systems: the computational systems that mediate our social interactions with one another. My research sits in an area known as human-computer interaction (HCI).

Chelsea Finn

Computer Science, Electrical Engineering
Assistant Professor
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Computer Science, Electrical Engineering


Last Updated: January 28, 2023

Our lab is interested in the capability of robots and other agents to develop broadly intelligent behavior through learning and interaction. We work on robotics and machine learning, and we are affiliated with SAIL, the ML Group, the Stanford Robotics Center, and CRFM.

Eleni Linos

Dermatology, Epidemiology and Population Health
Professor
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Dermatology, Epidemiology and Population Health


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Our team’s research spans the fields of dermatology, technology and public health. One of our main projects is centered on developing innovative skin cancer prevention interventions using social media. Another project area is the use of shared decision-making, mobile app technology for monitoring and optimal care of low risk skin cancers. We collaborate closely with colleagues in bioinformatics and computer science on use of visual Artificial intelligence methods to skin image monitoring. Additionally, we advocate for diversity and gender equity in medicine by writing both original data articles and perspective pieces on these topics. We collaborate with epidemiologists, clinicians, biostatisticians, basic, computer and social scientists at Stanford University as well as other institutions.

  • Clinical Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases

Anthony Oro

Dermatology
Professor
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Dermatology


Last Updated: November 11, 2021

Our research interests encompass cancer genomics and tumor evolution, stem cell biology and hair/skin development and regeneration, and definitive molecular and cellular therapeutics. Our basic science focus is motivated by our clinical interests that include hair biology, non-melanoma skin cancer, and stem cell-based therapies for genetic skin diseases.

Department URL:
https://med.stanford.edu/dermatology.html

  • Institutional Training Grant in Genome Science
  • Postgraduate Training Program in Epithelial Biology
  • Training in Pediatric Nonmalignant Hematology and Stem Cell Biology

Kevin Wang

Dermatology
Assistant Professor
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Dermatology


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

The Wang Lab takes an interdisciplinary approach to studying fundamental mechanisms controlling gene expression in mammalian cells. Our work shows how epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, chromatin modifications, and RNA influence chromatin dynamics to affect gene regulation. OUR LAB IS CURRENTLY FOCUSED ON: How various dynamic epigenetic changes in chromatin structure impact gene expression during stem cell pluripotency/self-renewal, cellular differentiation, and reprogramming; How three-dimensional chromosomal structure and dysregulation contribute to development of diseases such as aging and cancer; and How to create novel genome engineering tools to interrogate the noncoding genome and the epigenome.
 
The long-term goal of The Wang Lab is to translate our understanding of these complex mechanisms to studies of human diseases.

Alistair Boettiger

Developmental Biology
Assistant Professor
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Developmental Biology


Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Our lab focuses on the role of three-dimensional genome organization in regulating gene expression and shaping cell fate specification during development. We pursue this with advanced single-molecule imaging and transgenic techniques in Drosophila and mammalian cell culture.

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