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PRISM Mentors

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PRISM supports all faculty in recruiting postdocs. The faculty listed on this page have expressed special interest in the PRISM program and may be actively recruiting. This is one of many ways to identify potential postdoc mentors; also review the guidance and links in the PRISM Application Guide for other ways to explore Stanford faculty. As you look for potential postdoc mentors, consider how faculty research interests align with your own.

Faculty: to create a profile, click "Log In" at the top right corner, then the "PRISM Faculty Opt In" button below. To edit an existing profile, click "Log In" at the top right corner, then the "Edit" button under your name/department/URL.

 

Electrical Engineering
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

Dan Congreve

Electrical Engineering
Assistant Professor
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Electrical Engineering

Last Updated: August 15, 2023

Nanoscale Materials to Solve Next Generation Challenges
The challenges facing us today are immense, and nanomaterials have shown great promise to aid in their solutions. Yet individual material systems often have significant drawbacks that prevent successful adaptation. We seek to unite material systems to build nanoscale systems where we control the flow of light, energy, and spin. By combining and understanding these material systems, we aim to uncover unique strengths and physics that are unachievable by individual systems alone, finding solutions to the challenging problems facing us.

See congrevelab.stanford.edu for more information!

Biochemistry
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

Dan Herschlag

Biochemistry
Professor
View in Stanford Profiles

Biochemistry

Last Updated: September 02, 2020

To understand biology, we need chemistry and physics as the physical and chemical properties of biomolecules enable and constrain what biology can do and how it has evolved. We are particularly interested in questions of: (i) how enzymes work; (ii) how RNA folds; (iii) how proteins recognize RNA; (iv) RNA/protein interactions in regulation and control; and (v) the evolution of molecules and molecular interactions. Our interdisciplinary approaches span and integrate physics, chemistry and biology, employ a wide range of techniques, and are question driven. We have new projects in each of the above areas as we:
• Pioneer high-throughput quantitative approaches to study enzymes—to address how an entire protein contributes to its function, how allosteric signals are propagated, how different human alleles affect function and/or stability, and ultimately how to design new enzymes (with Polly Fordyce);
• Work to understand the evolution of enzyme function and stability via functional, genome-scale analyses, and experimental evolutionary studies;
• Pioneer the determination of enzyme conformational ensembles—and linking these to function via novel “ensemble¬–function” studies;
• Develop a quantitative and predictive model for RNA tertiary folding thermodynamics and kinetics, building from the “RNA Reconstitution Model”;
• Provide the first quantitative and complete descriptions of the affinity and specificity of RNA binding proteins for all possible RNA sequences and structures (with Will Greenleaf);
• Pioneer Quantitative Cellular Biochemistry (QCB) to bring together the power of biochemistry and genomics to the study molecular interactions and function in cells, with the goal of providing quantitative and predictive models for molecular function and regulation in cells.

Ellen Yeh

Biochemistry
Associate Professor
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Biochemistry

Last Updated: July 14, 2022

The Yeh Lab studies the apicoplast, a unique plastid organelle in Plasmodium falciparum parasites that cause malaria. We are particularly focused on unbiased chemical and genetic screens to discover new cell biology and therapeutic targets for this important global health disease. Our work highlights the untapped opportunities in exploring divergent biology in non-model organisms, a theme we plan to expand in the lab by studying ocean algae (malaria's cousins!) and their role in the global ecosystem.

  • Molecular Basis of Host Parasite Interaction
Chemical and Systems Biology
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

Dan Jarosz

Chemical and Systems Biology
Associate Professor
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Chemical and Systems Biology

Last Updated: June 30, 2022

Protein self-assembly in evolution, disease, and development; Systems biology of aging;  Mutational robustness in cancer and pathogens; Quantitative analysis of evolving genotype-to-phenotoype maps. Epigenetic control of interspecies interactions.

Developmental Biology
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

Dan Jarosz

Developmental Biology
Associate Professor
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Developmental Biology

Last Updated: June 30, 2022

Protein self-assembly in evolution, disease, and development; Systems biology of aging;  Mutational robustness in cancer and pathogens; Quantitative analysis of evolving genotype-to-phenotoype maps. Epigenetic control of interspecies interactions.

David Kingsley

Developmental Biology
Professor
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Developmental Biology

Last Updated: December 01, 2022

Although the genomes of many organisms have now been sequenced, we still know relatively little about the specific DNA sequence changes that underlie important traits and diseases. My laboratory has developed an innovative combination of genetic and genomic approaches to identify the detailed molecular mechanisms that control key vertebrate traits. We use genetic crosses in mice, stickleback fish, and pluripotent stem cells to identify key chromosome regions controlling phenotypic traits. We use comparative genomics and  gene expression analysis in different populations, species, and hybrids to identify particular genomic changes with these key regions.  And we use transgenic and genome editing approaches to test the phenotypic effect of specific genomic changes, thus providing a direct functional link  between DNA sequence changes and classic phenotypes.  By combining genetics and genomics we have been able to identify the detailed molecular basis of major changes in skeletal structures, limb development, pigmentation, and neural functions across a range of populations and species.  We are currently extending these approaches to genetic and genomic mapping of human traits and diseases using experiments with chimp and human stem cells.    We are still a long way from knowing the genomic mechanisms that have made us human. However, we believe that molecular mechanisms contributing to human  traits can now be studied, and that progress in this area will lead to important new insights into both human health and human disease.

Radiology
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

Dan Spielman

Radiology
Professor
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Radiology

Last Updated: July 14, 2022

Dr. Spielman’s research is in the field of MRI, spectroscopy (MRS), and PET, with a focus on the development of new methods of imaging in vivo metabolism. Current projects include 13C MRS of hyperpolarized substrates for the assessment of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in cancer, 1H MRS measurements brain oxidative stress and neurotransmission, and combined PET/MRS studies.  He has focused on a novel array of both acquisition and analysis techniques for use in preclinical and clinical studies.


Associated T32s: Stanford Center for Imaging Training (SCIT), Stanford Molecular Imaging Scholars (SMIS), Stanford Training in Biomedical Imaging Instrumentation (TBI2)

Daniel Bruce Ennis

Radiology
Associate Professor
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Radiology

Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Daniel Ennis (Ph.D.) is an Associate Professor in the Department of Radiology. As an MRI scientist for nearly twenty years, he has worked to develop advanced translational cardiovascular MRI methods for quantitatively assessing structure, function, flow, and remodeling in both adult and pediatric populations. He began his research career as a Ph.D. student in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Johns Hopkins University during which time he formed an active collaboration with investigators in the Laboratory of Cardiac Energetics at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NIH/NHLBI). Thereafter, he joined the Departments of Radiological Sciences and Cardiothoracic Surgery at Stanford University as a post doc and began to establish an independent research program with an NIH K99/R00 award focused on “Myocardial Structure, Function, and Remodeling in Mitral Regurgitation.” For ten years he led a group of clinicians and scientists at UCLA working to develop and evaluate advanced cardiovascular MRI exams as PI of several NIH funded studies. In 2018 he returned to Stanford Radiology and the Radiological Sciences Lab to bolster programs in cardiovascular MRI. He is also the Director of Radiology Research for the Veterans Administration Palo Alto Health Care System where he oversees a growing radiology research program.

Daniel Rubin

Radiology
Professor of Biomedical Data Science, Radiology, and Medicine
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Radiology

Last Updated: August 17, 2020

The QIAI lab focuses on cutting‐edge research at the intersection of imaging science and biomedical informatics, developing and applying AI methods to large amounts of medical data for biomedical discovery, precision medicine, and precision health (early detection and prediction of future disease). The lab develops novel methods in text and image analysis and AI, including multi-modal and multi-task learning, weak supervision, knowledge representation, natural language processing, and decision theory to tackle the challenges of leveraging medical Big Data. Our exciting work is bridging a spectrum of biomedical domains with multidisciplinary collaborations with top scientists at Stanford as well as with other institutions internationally. The QIAI lab provides a unique multidisciplinary environment for conducing innovative AI-based healthcare research with a strong record of scholarly publication and achievement. Core research topics in the laboratory include: (1) automated image annotation using unsupervised methods of processing associated radiology reports using word embeddings and related methods; (2) developing methods of analyzing longitudinal EMR data to predict clinical outcomes and best treatments, (3) creating multi-modal deep learning models integrating multi-dimensional EMR and other data to discover electronic phenotypes of disease, (4) developing AI models with noisy or sparse labels (weak supervision), and cross-modal, multi-task learning, and observational AI approaches, and (5) developing and implementing algorithms for distributed computation for training deep learning models that leverage multi-institutional data while avoiding the barriers to data sharing.

  • Stanford Cancer Imaging Training (SCIT) Program
Physics
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

Daniel Akerib

Physics
Professor
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Physics

Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Together with Tom Shutt, Dan works on the LUX and LZ dark matter experiments to search for dark matter in the form of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, or WIMPs. The detectors use liquid xenon as a target medium in a time projection chamber, or TPC. The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment is currently operating a 250-kg target in the former Homestake gold mine in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Preparations are underway at SLAC to design and build the 7-ton successor, known as LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ). The group is involved in many aspects of data analysis, detector design, xenon purification, control andreadout systems, and detector performance studies.

Kavli Institute
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

Daniel Akerib

Kavli Institute
Professor
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Kavli Institute

Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Together with Tom Shutt, Dan works on the LUX and LZ dark matter experiments to search for dark matter in the form of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, or WIMPs. The detectors use liquid xenon as a target medium in a time projection chamber, or TPC. The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment is currently operating a 250-kg target in the former Homestake gold mine in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Preparations are underway at SLAC to design and build the 7-ton successor, known as LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ). The group is involved in many aspects of data analysis, detector design, xenon purification, control andreadout systems, and detector performance studies.

Ped: Cardiology
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

Daniel Bernstein

Ped: Cardiology
Professor
View in Stanford Profiles

Ped: Cardiology

Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Our lab has several major interests: 1. Using CRISPR-edited hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes to develop a better understanding of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and congenital heart disease. 2. The role of alterations in mitochondrial structure and function in dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. 3. Single cell analysis of mitochondrial function and the effect of mitochondrial heterogeneity on cellular function. 4. Differences between right and left ventricular responses to stress and in their modes of failure, including gene expression and miR regulation of angiogenesis and mitochondrial function. 5. Use of iPSC-CMs in pharmacogenomics, specifically determining the role of gene variants in anthracycline cardiotoxicity.

  • Training in Myocardial Biology at Stanford (TIMBS)

Daniel Bernstein

Ped: Cardiology
Endowed Professor
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Ped: Cardiology

Last Updated: November 29, 2021

The Bernstein Lab has several major foci:
 

1. Using iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes to develop a better understanding of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and congenital heart disease.
2. The role of alterations in mitochondrial structure and function in normal physiology and in diseases such as dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.
3. Single cell analysis of mitochondrial function reveals significant heterogeneity.

Specific projects underway in our lab include:

1. Using CRISPR-edited iPSC-cardiomyocytes to understand the mechanisms of cardiomyopathies and to solve the genotype-phenotype conundrum in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

2. The role of altered metabolism and mitochondrial function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

3. Alterations of mitochondrial structure and function, including processes of mitofusion, mitofission, autophagy and mitophagy, in normal physiology and disease.

4. Development of high-throughput single cell imaging technologies to measure single cell mitochondrial function, and to measure single mitochondrial function to determine the role of heterogeneity in cell life-death decision-making.

5. Development of micro-engineered platforms for assessment of biomechanics of single iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes.

 

We also are interested in clinical heart failure and cardiac transplantation in children, specifically:

1. Understanding alterations in immune system function in patients with after implantation of a left ventricular assist device, Immune system biomarkers that predict adverse outcomes after pediatric VAD implantation.

2. Understanding alterations in immune system function in children with heart failure before and after heart transplant.

3. Development of biomarkers for the detection and monitoring of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in pediatric solid organ transplant patients.
 

Possible T-32 Options Include:
Training in Myocardial Biology at Stanford (TIMBS)

  • Training in Myocardial Biology at Stanford (TIMBS)
Pediatrics
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

Daniel Bernstein

Pediatrics
Professor and Associate Dean

Pediatrics

Last Updated: August 17, 2020

Our lab has several major foci:


1. Using iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes to develop a better understanding of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and congenital heart disease.
2. The role of alterations in mitochondrial structure and function in normal physiology and in diseases such as dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.
3. Single cell analysis of mitochondrial function reveals significant heterogeneity.

 

Specific projects underway in our lab include:

1. Using CRISPR-edited iPSC-cardiomyocytes to understand the mechanisms of cardiomyopathies and to solve the genotype-phenotype conundrum in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

2. The role of altered metabolism and mitochondrial function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

3. Alterations of mitochondrial structure and function, including processes of mitofusion, mitofission, autophagy and mitophagy, in normal physiology and disease.

4. Development of high-throughput single cell imaging technologies to measure single cell mitochondrial function, and to measure single mitochondrial function to determine the role of heterogeneity in cell life-death decision-making.

5. Development of micro-engineered platforms for assessment of biomechanics of single iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes.

 

We also are interested in clinical heart failure and cardiac transplantation in children, specifically:

1. Understanding alterations in immune system function in patients with after implantation of a left ventricular assist device, Immune system biomarkers that predict adverse outcomes after pediatric VAD implantation.

2. Understanding alterations in immune system function in children with heart failure before and after heart transplant.

3. Development of biomarkers for the detection and monitoring of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in pediatric solid organ transplant patients.

  • Training in Myocardial Biology at Stanford (TIMBS)

Daniel Bernstein

Pediatrics
Professor and Associate Dean
View in Stanford Profiles

Pediatrics

Last Updated: February 01, 2023

Our lab has several major focuses:
1. Using iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes to develop a better understanding of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and congenital heart disease.
2. The role of alterations in mitochondrial structure and function in normal physiology (such as exercise) and in disease such as dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.
3. Single cell analysis of mitochondrial function reveals significant heterogeneity.
4. Differences between right and left ventricular responses to stress and in their modes of failure, including gene expression and miR regulation.
5. Use of iPSC-CMs in pharmacogenomics, specifically determining the role of gene variants in doxorubicin cardiotoxicity.

Specific projects underway in our lab include:

1. Alterations of mitochondrial structure and function, including processes of mitofusion, mitofission, autophagy and mitophagy, in normal physiology and disease.

2. Development of high-throughput single cell imaging technologies to measure single cell mitochondrial function, and to measure single mitochondrial function to determine the role of heterogeneity in cell life-death decision-making.

3. Differences between the right and left ventricles in their responses to stresses such as increased afterload and increased preload, including gene expression and gene regulation by micro-RNAs. The use of plasma miRs as biomakers for RV failure.

4. Using patient-derived iPSC-cardiomyocytes to understand the mechanisms of cardiomyopathies common in children and to solve the genotype-phenotype conundrum in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The role of altered metabolism and mitochondrial function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

5. Development of micro-engineered platforms for assessment of biomechanics of single iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes.

6. Developing tools to further mature hiPSC-CMs to more accurately recapitulate the mechanobiology of adult human CMS.

We also are interested in clinical heart failure and cardiac transplantation in children, specifically:

1. Understanding alterations in immune system function in patients with after implantation of a left ventricular assist device, Immune system biomarkers that predict adverse outcomes after pediatric VAD implantation.

2. Development of biomarkers for the detection and monitoring of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in pediatric transplant patients.

  • Training in Myocardial Biology at Stanford (TIMBS)

Danny Chou

Pediatrics
Assistant Professor
View in Stanford Profiles

Pediatrics

Last Updated: February 01, 2022

Our research program integrates concepts of chemical biology, protein engineering and structure biology to design new therapeutic leads and generate probes to study biological processes. A key focus of our lab is insulin, an essential hormone in our body to reduce blood glucose levels. We generate synthetic libraries of insulin analogs to select for chemical probes, and investigate natural insulin molecules (e.g. from the venom of fish-hunting cone snails!) to develop novel therapeutic candidates. We are especially interested in using chemical and enzymatic synthesis to create novel chemical entities with enhanced properties, and leverage the strong expertise of our collaborators to apply our skill sets in the fields of cancer biology, immunology and pain research. Our ultimate goal is to translate our discovery into therapeutic interventions in human diseases.

  • Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism

Elizabeth Egan

Pediatrics
Assistant Professor
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Pediatrics

Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Malaria is one of the leading causes of childhood morbidity and mortality in the world. The etiologic agent of severe malaria, Plasmodium falciparum, exclusively infects red blood cells during the blood stage of its life cycle, when all of the symptoms of malaria occur. P. falciparum is an obligate intracellular parasite, suggesting that it critically depends on host factors for its biology and pathogenesis. This concept is also supported by population genetic studies, which indicate that humans have evolved certain red cell traits, such as hemoglobinopathies, to protect against malaria. The importance of these host-pathogen interactions raises the possibility that critical red cell factors could serve as targets for new, host-directed therapeutics for malaria. However, our understanding of host determinants for malaria is limited because red cells are enucleated and lack DNA, hindering genetic manipulation. In the Egan laboratory we have surmounted this hurdle by adapting advances from stem cell biology to the study of malaria host factors. Specifically, we have developed approaches to differentiate primary human CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells down the erythroid lineage to enucleated red blood cells that can be infected by P. falciparum. This thus gives us access to the nucleated progenitor cells for genetic modification using RNAi and CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing. We are using these methods to develop forward genetic screens to identify novel host factors for malaria, as well as to perform mechanistic studies to understand the specific functions of critical host factors during the developmental cycle of malaria parasites. In addition, the lab has projects focused on understanding human adaptation to malaria using clinical samples. Our long term goal is to explore the possibility of host-directed therapeutics for malaria.

  • Molecular Basis of Host Parasite Interaction
  • Training in Pediatric Nonmalignant Hematology and Stem Cell Biology
Biomedical Data Sciences
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

Daniel Rubin

Biomedical Data Sciences
Professor of Biomedical Data Science, Radiology, and Medicine
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Biomedical Data Sciences

Last Updated: August 17, 2020

The QIAI lab focuses on cutting‐edge research at the intersection of imaging science and biomedical informatics, developing and applying AI methods to large amounts of medical data for biomedical discovery, precision medicine, and precision health (early detection and prediction of future disease). The lab develops novel methods in text and image analysis and AI, including multi-modal and multi-task learning, weak supervision, knowledge representation, natural language processing, and decision theory to tackle the challenges of leveraging medical Big Data. Our exciting work is bridging a spectrum of biomedical domains with multidisciplinary collaborations with top scientists at Stanford as well as with other institutions internationally. The QIAI lab provides a unique multidisciplinary environment for conducing innovative AI-based healthcare research with a strong record of scholarly publication and achievement. Core research topics in the laboratory include: (1) automated image annotation using unsupervised methods of processing associated radiology reports using word embeddings and related methods; (2) developing methods of analyzing longitudinal EMR data to predict clinical outcomes and best treatments, (3) creating multi-modal deep learning models integrating multi-dimensional EMR and other data to discover electronic phenotypes of disease, (4) developing AI models with noisy or sparse labels (weak supervision), and cross-modal, multi-task learning, and observational AI approaches, and (5) developing and implementing algorithms for distributed computation for training deep learning models that leverage multi-institutional data while avoiding the barriers to data sharing.

  • Stanford Cancer Imaging Training (SCIT) Program
Med: Biomedical Informatics Research (BMIR)
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

Daniel Rubin

Med: Biomedical Informatics Research (BMIR)
Professor of Biomedical Data Science, Radiology, and Medicine
View in Stanford Profiles

Med: Biomedical Informatics Research (BMIR)

Last Updated: August 17, 2020

The QIAI lab focuses on cutting‐edge research at the intersection of imaging science and biomedical informatics, developing and applying AI methods to large amounts of medical data for biomedical discovery, precision medicine, and precision health (early detection and prediction of future disease). The lab develops novel methods in text and image analysis and AI, including multi-modal and multi-task learning, weak supervision, knowledge representation, natural language processing, and decision theory to tackle the challenges of leveraging medical Big Data. Our exciting work is bridging a spectrum of biomedical domains with multidisciplinary collaborations with top scientists at Stanford as well as with other institutions internationally. The QIAI lab provides a unique multidisciplinary environment for conducing innovative AI-based healthcare research with a strong record of scholarly publication and achievement. Core research topics in the laboratory include: (1) automated image annotation using unsupervised methods of processing associated radiology reports using word embeddings and related methods; (2) developing methods of analyzing longitudinal EMR data to predict clinical outcomes and best treatments, (3) creating multi-modal deep learning models integrating multi-dimensional EMR and other data to discover electronic phenotypes of disease, (4) developing AI models with noisy or sparse labels (weak supervision), and cross-modal, multi-task learning, and observational AI approaches, and (5) developing and implementing algorithms for distributed computation for training deep learning models that leverage multi-institutional data while avoiding the barriers to data sharing.

  • Stanford Cancer Imaging Training (SCIT) Program
Chemical Engineering
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

Danielle Mai

Chemical Engineering
Assistant Professor
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Chemical Engineering

Last Updated: February 23, 2024

The Mai Research Group engineers biopolymers, which are the building materials of life. We seek to develop functional biomaterials and to enhance understanding in the physics of soft materials. Molecular-scale biopolymer design presents a unique opportunity to rationally design materials based on biomolecular templates. Moreover, biopolymer engineering incorporates the rich functional landscape of biological systems into responsive biomaterials. We are especially interested in connecting properties across multiple length scales (molecular, microscopic, macroscopic) using experimental methods. We integrate rational biomolecular design, biological and chemical synthesis, and multi-scale characterization techniques to engineer biopolymers with tunable mechanics, stimuli-responsive behavior, and self-healing properties. Initial research efforts address biological systems where deformation is significant, with specific project areas including: (i) muscle-mimetic materials from polypeptides, (ii) biolubricants from bottlebrush polymers, and (iii) selective filters from programmable hydrogels.

Danielle Mai

Chemical Engineering
Assistant Professor
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Chemical Engineering

Last Updated: January 28, 2023

Elizabeth Sattely

Chemical Engineering
Associate Professor
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Chemical Engineering

Last Updated: July 13, 2022

My laboratory is focused broadly on plant chemistry and is deeply invested in pathway discovery. Despite the important roles of plant natural products in plant and human health, very few complete plant biosynthetic pathways are known. This lack of knowledge limits our understanding of natural product mode of action in plants and prevents access to engineered pathways. New plant genome sequences and synthetic biology tools have enabled three research areas in my lab: 1) methods for accelerating pathway discovery in plants (especially for clinically used therapeutics), and 2) discovering new molecules from plants that are important for plant fitness, and 3) using metabolic engineering in plants as a tool to systematically and quantitatively determine the impact of plant molecules on human and plant health and ultimately optimize plant fitness and crop nutrient load. I am looking for postdocs who are interested in joining an interdisciplinary team of scientists and engineers to discover how plant natural products are made and their mode of action, and develop new tools for engineering biosynthetic pathways. Our vision is to use engineered biosynthesis to reveal mechanisms by which natural products from plants contribute to plant fitness and human health.

Center for Biomedical Ethics
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

David Magnus

Center for Biomedical Ethics
Director, Professor
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Center for Biomedical Ethics

Last Updated: November 11, 2021

The Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics (SCBE) is an interdisciplinary hub for faculty who do research, teaching, and service on topics in bioethics and medical humanities. SCBE researchers have pioneered new approaches to studying the ethical issues presented by new technologies in biomedicine, including Artificial Intelligence, CRISPR and Gene Therapy, Stem Cell Research, Synthetic Biology, and the Human Brain Initiative. To benefit patients, SCBE has undertaken novel, ground-breaking research to improve clinical care, including end of life care, communication between patients and physicians, care for disabled patients, and organ transplantation processes. SCBE offers postdoctoral fellowships in Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications (ELSI) Research and Clinical Ethics. We currently have an opening for a postdoctoral fellow in Clinical Ethics. View more information here. 

Med: Primary Care and Population Health
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

David Magnus

Med: Primary Care and Population Health
Director, Professor
View in Stanford Profiles

Med: Primary Care and Population Health

Last Updated: November 11, 2021

The Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics (SCBE) is an interdisciplinary hub for faculty who do research, teaching, and service on topics in bioethics and medical humanities. SCBE researchers have pioneered new approaches to studying the ethical issues presented by new technologies in biomedicine, including Artificial Intelligence, CRISPR and Gene Therapy, Stem Cell Research, Synthetic Biology, and the Human Brain Initiative. To benefit patients, SCBE has undertaken novel, ground-breaking research to improve clinical care, including end of life care, communication between patients and physicians, care for disabled patients, and organ transplantation processes. SCBE offers postdoctoral fellowships in Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications (ELSI) Research and Clinical Ethics. We currently have an opening for a postdoctoral fellow in Clinical Ethics. View more information here. 

Earth Energy Env Sciences
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

David Lobell

Earth Energy Env Sciences
Professor

Earth Energy Env Sciences

Last Updated: August 10, 2020

Food security; Agriculture; Data science; Remote Sensing

Elliott White Jr.

Earth Energy Env Sciences
Assistant Professor
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Earth Energy Env Sciences

Last Updated: January 26, 2022

The coastal margin is a complex socio-ecological landscape that is experiencing more frequent and stronger hazards from the coasts due to global climate change. Saltwater intrusion and Sea level rise (SWISLR) are placing coastal ecosystems under increasing threat, while humans in the coastal margin are pressured to make critical decisions regarding livelihood and well-being. Assessing, predicting, and mitigating the myriad challenges to the coastal margin requires a holistic approach that can integrate knowledge from different disciplines and work at multiple scales.

Med: Infectious Diseases
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

David Relman

Med: Infectious Diseases
Professor
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Med: Infectious Diseases

Last Updated: July 14, 2022

The primary research focus of the Relman Lab is the human indigenous microbiota (microbiome), and in particular, the nature and mechanisms of variation in patterns of microbial diversity within the human body as a function of time (microbial succession), space (biogeography within the host landscape), and in response to perturbation, e.g., antibiotics (community robustness and resilience). One of the goals of this work is to define the role of the human microbiome in health and disease. We are particularly interested in measuring and understanding resilience in the human microbial ecosystem. Our work includes the human oral cavity, gut, and female reproductive tract, as well as an analysis of microbial diversity in marine mammals. This research integrates theory and methods from ecology, population biology, environmental microbiology, genomics and clinical medicine.

  • Applied Genomics in Infectious Diseases
Microbiology and Immunology
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

David Schneider

Microbiology and Immunology
Professor, Chair, Advising Dean for Biosciences Graduate Students and Posdtoctoral Fellows
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Microbiology and Immunology

Last Updated: March 12, 2021

My group is intersted in preventing sickness following infections.  We do this not by limiting microbe load, but by increasing the body's tolerance and resilience to damage.  In the past we worked mostly on fruitflies, but have switched to studying mice and humans and focusing on malaria.  We try to identify modifiable physiological systems that we can perturb to improve health outcomes.  

  • Other

denise monack

Microbiology and Immunology
Professor
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Microbiology and Immunology

Last Updated: January 27, 2023

We study how the interactions between enteric bacterial pathogens, the gut microbiota and the immune system influence chronic infection and transmission to new hosts. Salmonella is one of the model pathogens that we study. Salmonella typhi cause systemic diseases such as typhoid fever. we also explore interactions between Salmonella and immune cells, such as macrophages. We have shown that persisting Salmonella exploit the metabolic immune state of alternatively activated macrophages in order to cause chronic infections.

We are very interested in human-adapted Salmonella and are trying to understand the evolution of the strains of Salmonella that cause typhoid fever. Recently we have developed a tool to study the genomes of various Salmonella and how the genes contribute to surviving the various stresses that the pathogens encounter during infection, including human macrophages.

  • Molecular Basis of Host Parasite Interaction

Dylan Dodd

Microbiology and Immunology
Assistant Professor
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Microbiology and Immunology

Last Updated: January 12, 2022

One of the key ways that the gut microbiome impacts human health is through the production of bioactive metabolites. By understanding how microbes produce these molecules, we aim to develop new approaches to promote human health and treat disease. Our laboratory employs bacterial genetics, metabolomics, and gnotobiotic mouse colonization to uncover the chemistry that underlies host-microbe interactions in the gut.

Elizabeth Egan

Microbiology and Immunology
Assistant Professor
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Microbiology and Immunology

Last Updated: July 13, 2022

Malaria is one of the leading causes of childhood morbidity and mortality in the world. The etiologic agent of severe malaria, Plasmodium falciparum, exclusively infects red blood cells during the blood stage of its life cycle, when all of the symptoms of malaria occur. P. falciparum is an obligate intracellular parasite, suggesting that it critically depends on host factors for its biology and pathogenesis. This concept is also supported by population genetic studies, which indicate that humans have evolved certain red cell traits, such as hemoglobinopathies, to protect against malaria. The importance of these host-pathogen interactions raises the possibility that critical red cell factors could serve as targets for new, host-directed therapeutics for malaria. However, our understanding of host determinants for malaria is limited because red cells are enucleated and lack DNA, hindering genetic manipulation. In the Egan laboratory we have surmounted this hurdle by adapting advances from stem cell biology to the study of malaria host factors. Specifically, we have developed approaches to differentiate primary human CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells down the erythroid lineage to enucleated red blood cells that can be infected by P. falciparum. This thus gives us access to the nucleated progenitor cells for genetic modification using RNAi and CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing. We are using these methods to develop forward genetic screens to identify novel host factors for malaria, as well as to perform mechanistic studies to understand the specific functions of critical host factors during the developmental cycle of malaria parasites. In addition, the lab has projects focused on understanding human adaptation to malaria using clinical samples. Our long term goal is to explore the possibility of host-directed therapeutics for malaria.

  • Molecular Basis of Host Parasite Interaction
  • Training in Pediatric Nonmalignant Hematology and Stem Cell Biology

Ellen Yeh

Microbiology and Immunology
Associate Professor

Microbiology and Immunology

Last Updated: July 12, 2022

Environmental microbiology (e.g. diatoms, algae) and synthetic biology

Topics: Nitrogen fixation, lipid biosynthesis and transprot, cellular endosymbiosis, nonmodel organisms

Application areas: Fertilizers, Biofuels

Ellen Yeh

Microbiology and Immunology
Associate Professor
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Microbiology and Immunology

Last Updated: July 14, 2022

The Yeh Lab studies the apicoplast, a unique plastid organelle in Plasmodium falciparum parasites that cause malaria. We are particularly focused on unbiased chemical and genetic screens to discover new cell biology and therapeutic targets for this important global health disease. Our work highlights the untapped opportunities in exploring divergent biology in non-model organisms, a theme we plan to expand in the lab by studying ocean algae (malaria's cousins!) and their role in the global ecosystem.

  • Molecular Basis of Host Parasite Interaction
Med: Oncology
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

Dean Felsher

Med: Oncology
Professor
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Med: Oncology

Last Updated: January 12, 2022

I am a Professor of Medicine-Oncology and Pathology and the Director of TRAM, ARTS and CTNT Programs.

My laboratory studies how oncogenes such as MYC initiate and maintain cancer.  In partic ular we have shown that shutting down oncogenes even for a brief time can revese cancer or elicit "Oncogene Addiction"  For a recent review of our work please see:

The MYC oncogene - the grand orchestrator of cancer growth and immune evasion Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology, 2022

Members of my laboratory are studying basic mechanisms of Oncogene Addiction, the role of Self-renewal/Stemness, Metabolism, Host Immune System, Protein 
Biogenesis, Microbiome, Extracellular Vesicles.  

We are developing novel therapuetics using small molecules, nanoparticles, proteins/peptides that can be used to target oncogenes and/or restore the immune response against cancer.

We are developing new diagnostic and imaging agents using PET, Mass Spec, Nanoproteomics, MIcrofluidics.

For recent examples of our work please see: Casey et al, Science, 2016; Gouw et al, Cell Metabolism, 2019; Dhanasekaran et al eLife, 2020; Swaminathan et al, Nat Comm 2020.

 

  • Cancer-Translational Nanotechnology Training Program (Cancer-TNT)
  • Molecular and Cellular Immunobiology
  • Stanford Cancer Imaging Training (SCIT) Program
  • Stanford Molecular Imaging Scholars (SMIS)
  • Training in Pediatric Nonmalignant Hematology and Stem Cell Biology
Biology
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

Dominique Bergmann

Biology
Professor
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Biology

Last Updated: February 23, 2024

The overall goal of my research program is to understand how stem cell-like populations are created and maintained in the context of an intact and environmental responsive tissue.  We use the Arabidopsis stomatal lineage for these studies as this epidermal cell lineage distills many of the features common to all tissue development: stomatal precursor cells are chosen from an initially equivalent field, they undergo asymmetric and self-renewing divisions, they communicate among themselves to establish pattern and they terminally differentiate into stable, physiologically important cell-types.  In the past decade, we have developed the stomatal lineage into a conceptual and technical framework for the study of cell fate, stem-cell self-renewal and cell polarity. Currently, we are especially interested in: (1) using new single-cell technologies to capture transcriptomic and chromatin state information about cells as they transit through various identities (stem cell-like, committed, differentiated, and reprogrammed); (2) using new ‘in vivo biochemical’ approaches to identify plant-specific cell polarity complexes and how these guide changes in cell shape, size and fate; (3) computational modeling of pattern formation in the epidermis, and (4) testing how environmental information impacts developmental choices and robustness.

Dominique Bergmann

Biology
Professor
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Biology

Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Our lab is interested in how stem cell-like populations are created and maintained in developing, environmental responsive tissues.  We primarily use the Arabidopsis stomatal lineage for these studies because this epidermal cell lineage distills features common to all tissue development: stomatal precursor cells are chosen from an initially equivalent field, they undergo asymmetric and self-renewing divisions, they communicate among themselves to establish pattern and they terminally differentiate into stable, physiologically important cell-types.  In the past decade, we have developed the stomatal lineage into a conceptual and technical framework for the study of cell fate, stem-cell self-renewal and cell polarity. Currently, we are especially interested in: (1) using single-cell technologies to capture transcriptomic and chromatin state information about cells as they transit through various identities (stem cell-like, committed, differentiated, and reprogrammed); (2) using new ‘in vivo biochemical’ approaches to identify transcription factor modules in the nuclear and cell polarity complexes at the plasma membrane, and to determine how these complexes guide changes in cell shape, size and fate; (3) computational modeling of pattern formation in the epidermis, and (4) testing how environmental information impacts developmental choices and robustness.

Geophysics
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

Dustin Schroeder

Geophysics
Assistant Professor
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Geophysics

Last Updated: October 21, 2021
Pathology
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

Dylan Dodd

Pathology
Assistant Professor
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Pathology

Last Updated: January 12, 2022

One of the key ways that the gut microbiome impacts human health is through the production of bioactive metabolites. By understanding how microbes produce these molecules, we aim to develop new approaches to promote human health and treat disease. Our laboratory employs bacterial genetics, metabolomics, and gnotobiotic mouse colonization to uncover the chemistry that underlies host-microbe interactions in the gut.

Ellen Yeh

Pathology
Associate Professor

Pathology

Last Updated: July 12, 2022

Environmental microbiology (e.g. diatoms, algae) and synthetic biology

Topics: Nitrogen fixation, lipid biosynthesis and transprot, cellular endosymbiosis, nonmodel organisms

Application areas: Fertilizers, Biofuels

Ellen Yeh

Pathology
Associate Professor
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Pathology

Last Updated: July 14, 2022

The Yeh Lab studies the apicoplast, a unique plastid organelle in Plasmodium falciparum parasites that cause malaria. We are particularly focused on unbiased chemical and genetic screens to discover new cell biology and therapeutic targets for this important global health disease. Our work highlights the untapped opportunities in exploring divergent biology in non-model organisms, a theme we plan to expand in the lab by studying ocean algae (malaria's cousins!) and their role in the global ecosystem.

  • Molecular Basis of Host Parasite Interaction
Surg: General Surgery
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

Electron Kebebew

Surg: General Surgery
Professor
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Surg: General Surgery

Last Updated: February 23, 2024

The Endocrine Oncology Research Laboratory is engaged in cutting-edge endocrine and neuroendocrine clinical, translational and basic research. Our research is focused on:

  • Identifying the molecular basis of endocrine cancers that could impact patient care.
  • Creating new and improved methods, strategies, technologies, and algorithms for the diagnosis of endocrine neoplasms.
  • Defining genetic testing criteria, and optimal screening and surveillance strategies for inherited endocrine and neuroendocrine syndromes.
  • Discovering new molecular, genetic, proteomic, and metabolomic markers for developing better diagnosis and novel targets for treatment of metastatic and advance endocrine and neuroendocrine cancers or biomarkers which could predict prognosis/response to surgical therapy.
  • Advanced imaging and genetics that will allow for precision endocrine surgery.
Dermatology
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

Eleni Linos

Dermatology
Professor
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Dermatology

Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Our team’s research spans the fields of dermatology, technology and public health. One of our main projects is centered on developing innovative skin cancer prevention interventions using social media. Another project area is the use of shared decision-making, mobile app technology for monitoring and optimal care of low risk skin cancers. We collaborate closely with colleagues in bioinformatics and computer science on use of visual Artificial intelligence methods to skin image monitoring. Additionally, we advocate for diversity and gender equity in medicine by writing both original data articles and perspective pieces on these topics. We collaborate with epidemiologists, clinicians, biostatisticians, basic, computer and social scientists at Stanford University as well as other institutions.

  • Clinical Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases
Epidemiology and Population Health
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

Eleni Linos

Epidemiology and Population Health
Professor
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Epidemiology and Population Health

Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Our team’s research spans the fields of dermatology, technology and public health. One of our main projects is centered on developing innovative skin cancer prevention interventions using social media. Another project area is the use of shared decision-making, mobile app technology for monitoring and optimal care of low risk skin cancers. We collaborate closely with colleagues in bioinformatics and computer science on use of visual Artificial intelligence methods to skin image monitoring. Additionally, we advocate for diversity and gender equity in medicine by writing both original data articles and perspective pieces on these topics. We collaborate with epidemiologists, clinicians, biostatisticians, basic, computer and social scientists at Stanford University as well as other institutions.

  • Clinical Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases
Neurology & Neurological Sci
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

Elizabeth Mormino

Neurology & Neurological Sci
Assistant Professor
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Neurology & Neurological Sci

Last Updated: February 23, 2024

Alzheimer's disease pathology begins decades before clinical symptoms of dementia are present, providing an important opportunity to understand early disease and the impact of this disease on cognitive aging.  We combine multimodal neuroimaging and genetics to determine how AD changes and risk factors influence subtle cognitive decline in older individuals. We have a particular focus on PET imaging of Amyloid and Tau proteins, but also work with structural and functional MRI data. The ultimate goals of our work are to improve our ability to predict who is most at risk for dementia, and to understand the time course of brain changes that occur decades before clinical symptoms are present.  We are specifically recruiting trainees with expertise in genetics, neuroimaging, or neuropsychology, to work on large scale multimodal imaging-genetic studies.

Materials Sci & Engineering
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

Eric Appel

Materials Sci & Engineering
Assistant Professor
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Materials Sci & Engineering

Last Updated: July 13, 2022

We are an interdisciplinary team focusing on generating new biomaterials to tackle healthcare challenges of critical importance to society. We are using these new biomaterials as sustained delivery technologies that can act as tools to better understand fundamental biological processes and to engineer next-generation healthcare solutions.

  • Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism
Ped: Endocrinology
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

Eric Appel

Ped: Endocrinology
Assistant Professor
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Ped: Endocrinology

Last Updated: July 13, 2022

We are an interdisciplinary team focusing on generating new biomaterials to tackle healthcare challenges of critical importance to society. We are using these new biomaterials as sustained delivery technologies that can act as tools to better understand fundamental biological processes and to engineer next-generation healthcare solutions.

  • Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism
Mechanical Engineering
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

Eric Darve

Mechanical Engineering
Professor
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Mechanical Engineering

Last Updated: August 15, 2023
Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

Eric Darve

Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering
Professor
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Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering

Last Updated: August 15, 2023
Anesthes, Periop & Pain Med
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

Eric Gross

Anesthes, Periop & Pain Med
Assistant Professor
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Anesthes, Periop & Pain Med

Last Updated: August 11, 2020

Our laboratory is developing tools to study genetic variants commonly found in Asians within the basic science laboratory including CRISPR mouse models, drug development/design, and protein chemistry. Most of our laboratory uses basic science techniques to study the cardiovascular system and we are funded through the NIH from NIGMS and NHLBI. Our NIGMS funded project focuses on genetic variants in Asians and developing precision medicine strategies for reducing perioperative organ injury and precision medicine strategies for delivering anesthesia and pain relievers such as opioids. Our NHLBI funded project is to study the cardiopulmonary effects of e-cigarettes in rodents and to further determine how a common genetic variant in East Asians may impact the cellular toxicity of e-cigarettes.

  • Anesthesia Training Grant in Biomedical Research
Chemistry
PRISM mentorsort descending Research Interests

Eric Kool

Chemistry
Professor
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Chemistry

Last Updated: January 29, 2023

The Kool lab uses the tools of chemistry and biology to study the structures, interactions and biological activities of nucleic acids and the enzymes that process them. Molecular design and synthesis play a major role in this work, followed by analysis of structure and function, both in vitro and in living systems. These studies are aimed at gaining a better basic understanding of biology, and applying this knowledge to practical applications in biomedicine.

Recent research interests include the development of chemical tools for mapping RNA structure and interactions in cells, methods for stabilization and conjugation of RNAs, and the development of probes of DNA repair pathways and their connections to cancer.

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