Stanford University


Showing 1-10 of 142 Results

  • Emilius Aalto

    Emilius Aalto

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Hopkins Marine Station

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My primary research interest is theoretical fisheries ecology, with a focus on population dynamics, spatial dynamics, and response to disease and catastrophic events. My current work involves the incorporation of the effects of ocean acidification and low-oxygen events into an abalone growth and reproduction model. Past projects include modeling indirect positive effects from fishing-induced competitive release and the effects of size-specific obligate predation on post-harvest recovery time.

  • Sebastian Alvarado

    Sebastian Alvarado

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in epigenetic mechanisms and how they respond to environmental changes (social, physical, seasonal, etc.). I am currently exploring this topic and its relation to social status/dominance in african cichlids regarding behavior and neuroepigenetics.

    Additionally, I consult for and operate Thwacke, a science consultancy for the entertainment industry.

  • Gregory Bratman

    Gregory Bratman

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Greg is working to define and study ?psychological ecosystem services? by examining the impact of nature experience on human cognitive function and mental health.

  • Martin Bringmann

    Martin Bringmann

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interest involves the development of plant leaves. Like animals, plants form complex multicellular organs, such as leaves, out of individual stem cell populations. These stem cells need to make fate decisions in order to attain a specialized shape and function. I use molecular genetics and microscopy- based methods to investigate how individual stem cells make the decision to commit to a certain fate. In particular, I am interested in the development of stomatal pores which decorate the leaf surface of land plants and allow them to exchange water vapor and carbon dioxide with the atmosphere.

    In the long run, I hope through my science i can contribute to questions regarding global climate change and water availability. Since stomatal pores are the direkt nexus between plants and the atmosphere, their functioning affects atmospheric carbon dioxide and water contents. In the light of this vast importance for plant viability and global climate, it is mesmerizing how much there is yet to learn.

  • Benjamin Bryant

    Benjamin Bryant

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests decision analyst and economic modeler focused on environment and development

Footer Links:

Stanford Medicine Resources: